TIME viral

This Is What the ‘Charlie Bit My Finger’ Boys Look Like Now

Prepare to feel crazy old

The Charlie Bit My Finger! boys are all grown up!

With over 816 million views, the video is on the Mount Rushmore of early viral videos. Because of its fame, a BBC children’s reporter recently visited the boys’ home and discovered the 11-year-old Harry and his 9-year-old brother Charlie still have that knack for being adorable.

We also learned that the only reason the world even met the boys is because the original file was too large for their father Howard to upload to email.

The parents have used the video’s success to secure sponsorship deals and the kids have appeared in advertisements.

However, Charlie and Harry are no longer the only boys in the family vying for viral success as they now have two younger brothers.

Relive the classic “Charlie bit me” line below.

Read next: This Is a Baby’s Brain on Pain

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

MONEY

This Is What a World Without Women Would Look Like

On March 8, females disappeared from ads to promote the Not-there.org campaign

On March 8, ads, books and magazine covers around New York City looked a bit empty.

Where there were once women—on a Dove soap billboard, on HarperCollins books, on Condé Nast magazine covers, on a phone booth ad for the New York City Ballet, among other places—pictures had been replaced with white space and a URL reading Not-there.org. You can see examples in the gallery above.

The collaborative campaign by the Clinton Foundation and ad agency Droga5 for International Women’s Day was meant to bring attention to a new report from No Ceilings: The Full Participation Project. The initiative seeks to “raise awareness that women are ‘not there’ yet on issues of gender equality.”

This year also marked the twentieth anniversary of Hillary Clinton addressing the United Nations in Beijing to assert, “It is no longer acceptable to discuss women’s rights as separate from human rights.”

On the surface, this clever media stunt taught us that a world without women would be lacking of some serious talent. The stage for the New York City Ballet would be bare. Tennis rackets would just be laying on the court at the US Open. There would be less laughter, without actresses like Amy Poehler and Cameron Diaz. And we may not have won World War II, since it was women—characterized by Rosie the Riveter—who took up the domestic effort to produce munitions and war supplies.

If you got the message and moused your way over to the report, you’d also learn about the great leaps women have made in recent years and the bounds that they still need to make to catch up.

More laws protect women today than ever before, but they are not always enforced. More girls are getting educations, and women outnumber men at colleges—but not in the STEM programs that feed some of the highest-paid industries.

The gender workforce gap hasn’t changed in twenty years, and women are underrepresented in political office and management ranks.

Paid maternity leave is now common for women across the world, but not in the U.S.—one of nine countries in the world that does not guarantee paid leave.

And women spend up to 5 more hours on unpaid domestic work than men.

While the lack of women may have been blatantly obvious on prominent billboards, magazines, book covers and bus posters, the Not There campaign also encourages us to look elsewhere. What about in the engineering programs at college? What about on the Hill in Washington? What about that empty Aeron chair in the CEO’s corner office?

This is part of The Photo Bank, a recurring feature on Money.com dedicated to conceptual photography on financial issues. Submissions are welcome and should be sent to Sarina Finkelstein, online photo editor for Money.com at sarina.finkelstein@timeinc.com.

TIME viral

You’ll Actually Want to Watch Geico’s New Ad All the Way to the End

It's pretty much unskippable

When it comes to online advertising, it’s hard to get an audience to stick around to see what product is being advertised. That’s particularly true for those ads that force you to watch for five seconds, before letting you skip and get on with watching your skateboarding cat video. Geico has come up with an ingenious solution to that problem: make an ad that you won’t want to skip.

The company’s latest campaign features a series of ads that run for less than five seconds and puts the product right up front, meaning you can’t skip it. But Geico takes it a step further and actually rewards viewers with an ad that is simple, funny, and watchable and thus, really effective.

While the solution seems obvious, it’s hard to engage today’s jaded consumers and Geico has managed it.

 

TIME Companies

GoDaddy Pulls Controversial Puppy Commercial From Super Bowl

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fotostorm—Getty Images

The commercial caused outrage on social media, with many raising concerns about animal cruelty

Website-building service GoDaddy decided to pull its upcoming Super Bowl commercial and delete it from YouTube after people accused the firm of condoning the sale of puppies online.

The company issued a statement assuring the public that it had heeded their calls to nix the controversial ad, USA Today reported.

The ad, which featured a puppy finding its way home, resulted in several Twitter and Facebook users, as well as organizations like the SPCA, raising concerns about animal cruelty. The clip shows the puppy being sold on a website built using GoDaddy.

“The responses were emotional and direct. Many people urged us not to run the ad,” the company said. “The net result? We are pulling the ad from the Super Bowl.”

[USA Today]

TIME society

Why Tiffany & Co.’s New Same-Sex Couple Ad Is Important to Me

A person walks past a Tiffany & Co. store on Jan. 12, 2015 in New York City.
Spencer Platt—Getty Images A person walks past a Tiffany & Co. store on Jan. 12, 2015 in New York City.

xoJane.com is where women go to be their unabashed selves, and where their unabashed selves are applauded

It's nice to feel that a company that I’ve been wearing for so long went out of its way to stand behind marriage equality

xojane

By now, you’re probably aware that Tiffany & Co. just released its first ad featuring a same-sex couple. If you haven’t already seen it, here it is in all its glory.

The photo, shot by fashion photographer Peter Lindbergh, features a real life gay couple from New York, accompanied by the text “Will you?” Cute, right?

Tiffany is hardly the first company to feature a same-sex couple in its advertising. It joins the ranks of companies The Gap, JCPenny, and Banana Republic, to name a few, who have made gay couples a part of their advertising campaigns. But just because it’s not the first to do it doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be celebrated.

One of the things that stands out to me the most about this ad is not that it features two men, but that it features people at all. Tiffany ads are typically completely devoid of any models, placing all focus on huge images of the jewelry.

Where many luxury jewelry brands employ celebrity faces to hawk their pieces, Tiffany (usually) lets its jewelry speak for itself, showcasing its pieces against the signature Tiffany-blue background.

Even on the website, you’ll only see a piece modeled on a hand or neck to better illustrate size and scale. So to me, Tiffany didn’t just use a gay couple where a straight couple would normally be; it made an exception and made them the focal point, the engagement rings a close second.

If you can’t already tell, I’m a huge fan of Tiffany, and have been for quite a while. I’ve worn one of the brand’s bands on my right ring finger for the last seven years, and this fall, I copped my mom and I matching T Rings from its new T Collection because both of our names start with the letter T. I know, how cute. Personally, it’s kind of nice to feel that a company that I’ve been representing for so long went out of its way to stand behind marriage equality.

I’ve heard a lot of people say that a company using a gay couple in its advertising shouldn’t be news, and I hear that, but I’d rather not look at it that way. True, featuring the LGBT community shouldn’t still be worthy of a headline, but I do think that it’s still worthy of recognition, at the very least. There are a lot of companies who are happy to take our money while still looking at us as second-class citizens, and I’m probably giving my money to more of them than I’d like to without even realizing it. So while I’m the king of skepticism, I’m not going to pick this one apart. I choose to see this good thing as a good thing.

True, this is an ad, and its purpose, at the end of the day, is to sell. It was no doubt conceived in a boardroom and given the green light because the suits behind Tiffany knew that it would be newsy enough for every media outlet to run an article about it, just like this one, which would mean a whole lot of free advertising for them. But you know what? I’m fine with that. Because the more eyes on it, the better.

I was thinking about what it would be like if I was in high school again, the only out gay kid in my class and probably the entire school, seeing this ad. Personally, it would have been powerful for me as a teenager to see an image of two men, well-adjusted and happily engaged.

Walking through the halls every day, being so nervous all the time because I stuck out like a sore gay thumb, feeling like such a frazzled weirdo simply because of who I was. Looking through a magazine and have this company tell me “Yo. Look at these fine men. They’re just like you. You’re beautiful and normal and your love is worthy of recognition,” that would have been big for me to see.

So you’re right when you say this sort of thing shouldn’t still be a headline, but if all of these headlines serve to get the ad in front of more peoples’ faces, then great.

It reminds me of this summer when a friend and I were cruising around in my car. Macklemore’s “Same Love” came on the radio, and he made some comment about how he was sick of the song because it is so overplayed. I pointed out that, yeah, the song had been played to death, but did you ever think we’d see a day where a rap song about marriage equality would be overplayed on top 40 radio?

Five years ago, less than that, even, the song would most likely never made it on an album, let alone on the radio. Now we can’t get rid of it. What I’m saying is, you gotta count your small victories where you can get them. And besides, it’s better than hearing “Dark Horse” for the thousandth time.

I realize that “Same Love” comes with its own slew of issues, like his Grammy win over genre-defining artists like Kanye West, Drake, and Kendrick Lamar, or the fact that it could have been done better by one of the many up-and-coming queer rappers who can spit better then Macklemore all day long, but I don’t hate on him for being an ally.

I guess how I see it is that no matter if it’s a jewelry ad or a rap song, visibility in all forms is important. Whether its marriage equality, trans rights, the homeless LGBT youth population, or any of the many issues facing the LGBT community, I personally count each and every instance of increased visibility as a win, and motivation to demand more of it. Personally, it’s just nice to feel seen.

Tynan Sinks is a music journalist and contributor for xoJane. This article originally appeared on xoJane.com.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Apple

Watch Apple’s Emotional New iPad Commercial

Just in time for the holiday season

Apple has a new commercial out for the iPad Air 2 just in time for the holiday season.

Under the tagline “Change is in the Air,” the 60-second commercial shows Apple’s newest tablet used in a variety of settings, with a heavy emphasis on scrappy, artisanal startups. The scenes show creative types using their iPads to design a tattoo, manage a flock of sheep or snap a blueprint for a 3-D printer — anything other than plain old web surfing.

MORE: The Top 10 Most Powerful Ads of 2014

“From the studio to the classroom, the field to the garage, it’s helping people discover new and better ways to do the things they love,” Apple wrote.

TIME Opinion

IKEA Made A Talking Mirror That Basically Just Tells You You’re Pretty All Day

Stick to the Swedish meatballs?

Meet IKEA’s “Motivational Mirror” — a wall accessory whose only job is to deliver effusive, 100% genuine compliments like “Magnificent beard!” and “Your eyes are mesmerizing!” and “Darling, your dress looks amazing!” (Even though it kind of looks like a shirt… but it’s the thought that counts.)

IKEA

The Swedish furniture retailer put the promotional mirror in a British store last week, “bestowing personalised compliments to provide the nation with a much needed morale boost,” according to a statement.

IKEA-commissioned research found 44% of people in the UK are critical of their appearance and 26% say they feel uncomfortable looking in a mirror. BUT 26% also said that “a kind word” makes them like themselves more. And thus, a Dove-esque empowerment stunt was born.

Except, instead of having consumers come to the conclusion that they are really more beautiful than they think they are on their own, IKEA has a far more reliable source — a mirror programmed with audio — do it for them.

This is actually a familiar trope. Adweek notes, “the inspirational talking mirror idea has been done before—most notably by the all-female Austin band The Mrs., but also by other marketers.

Sure, compliments can be nice, but it is a tad on the creepy side — particularly when a man in a blue button down, showing just enough chest hair, is stopped by the mirror … whistling at him.

IKEA

(Yes, that is an animation of a cat calling wolf).

It’s an odd choice to make unsolicited whistling — street harassment is a very real issue women face on a daily basis— look cutesy, but at least the customer doesn’t seem to mind.

“It was great for me because I never get compliments,” the man recalls, wistfully. “I could have stood there all day, to be honest.”

Still, maybe IKEA should stick to its specialty: flat-pack furniture, ball pits and Swedish meatballs.

TIME Opinion

Subway Wants Women to Stay Skinny So They Can Wear Sexy Halloween Costumes

This new ad reminds you that it's never time to stop dieting

You thought it was over. You thought it was finally safe to sit down at lunch and eat one, just one, burger. Subway wants you to know that YOU THOUGHT WRONG.

Thank your lucky thigh gap the sandwich chain, which recent research asserts is just as unhealthy as McDonald’s, is here to remind you that it’s your moral obligation to stay skinny. Because “bikini season may be over” — that’s an actual quote from the company’s YouTube page — “but there’s more reasons right around the corner to stay fit.”

Namely: To wear skimpy Halloween costumes. Cue a video montage set to the tune of waiting room music where an excessively perky woman models an array of sexy costumes.

Except, Subway clearly isn’t allowed to say sexy. Rather, it’s a “hot devil” (too literal), “sassy teacher” (literally smacking a ruler against her hand), “foxy fullback” (please, let’s get into how women feel about the NFL right now), and our personal favorite, “attractive nurse.”

Luckily for Subway, there’s an emerging sexy (albeit bizarre) Christmas costume market, so that they can keep their “it’s never ok to break a diet” campaign going.

Your skinny coworker lunch buddy will be watching you!

TIME World Cup

World Cup Whimsy Captured in New McDonalds Ad

Adorable kids, a woman in stiletto heels, and an elderly man in a motorized all can’t help but catch the futbol fever sweeping the world right now, showcasing some spectacular stunts (seriously, how many takes did it take to land that shot in the back of a moving truck?) in a quirky FIFA-themed ad from the marketers under the Golden Arches. The ad serves as a promotion for their site gol.mcd.com.

Talk about a Happy Meal.

TIME Italy

In Country’s First Gay-Friendly Ad, Son Comes Out Over Pasta in Italy

This is believed to be the first gay friendly campaign in a country that is often entrenched in homophobia

Coming out over pasta might be fairly common in Italian homes, but for what is believed to be the first time, an ad will be portraying the family event across Italian televisions.

Findus, a frozen food company, produced what is believed to be the first gay-friendly ad in the European country.

In the commercial — in which no faces are shown — a man named Luca and his mother bond over microwaved pasta cooked by Luca’s boyfriend.

“Mom, there is another small surprise,” says Luca in the ad. Is it the risotto cooked in the microwave, wonders the mother. “Gianni isn’t just my roommate, he’s my boyfriend!” quips the son.

The ad comes nine months after the chairman of Italian pasta maker Barilla came under fire for saying that he would never use a gay family in his ads. The company eventually announced a “more inclusive” initiative to “establish a more active, global leadership on diversity,” including hiring a “chief diversity officer.”

Gay activists in Europe praised the video for showcasing the simplicity and the daily life of a gay couple. “It’s a positive step forward when different types of families are portrayed in ads, as they resonate with parts of society that are usually marginalized,” said Juris Lavrikovs, the communications manager of ILGA, Europe’s International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans & Intersex Association.

 

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