TIME States

See Governor Rick Perry’s New Mugshot

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Texas Governor Rick Perry indictment over charges of alleged abuse of power left him required to something not common of a sitting governor: take a mugshot.

Perry turned himself in to have his mugshot taken on Tuesday at the Travis County Courthouse in Austin, Texas.

Perry ardently objects to charges laid out against him by the Travis County District Attorney. He stated on Tuesday that he remained confident because of his belief that “the rule of law would prevail.”

Perry followed up his trip to the courthouse with a trip to an ice cream shop.

TIME 2016 presidential election

Romney: How Republicans Will Take Back the White House

Romney criticized Clinton's response to Bergdahl's release and expressed confidence that a Republican will take back the White House in 2016

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After hosting a high-profile summit over the weekend that included many Republican presidential hopefuls, Mitt Romney appeared on NBC’s Meet the Press on Sunday to discuss politics within the G.O.P. and the 2016 election.

When asked by host David Gregory what he would do if he were a presidential candidate running against Hillary Clinton in 2016, Romney pointed to Clinton’s past political record as her weakness.

“I think you have to consider what’s happened around the world during the years that she was secretary of State,” Romney said. “And you have to say it’s been a monumental bust.”

Romney also referred to Clinton’s comments regarding the exchange for Bowe Bergdahl, in which she said the released Taliban leaders did not pose a threat to the U.S.

“And she came back with a clueless answer,” Romney said. “She was clueless.”

According to Romney, those points will be “the foundation of how a Republican candidate is able to take back the White House.”

TIME 2016 Election

Hillary Clinton Is Popular as Book Tour Launches, Poll Says

Clinton far outpaces a field of potential candidates for President

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton remains popular and well-liked for her tenure as America’s top diplomat, according to a new poll that puts the potential presidential candidate at the front of the 2016 pack on the eve of her book launch.

Two-thirds of registered voters see Clinton as a strong leader, and almost 60% approve of her job as Secretary of State, according to the Washington Post-ABC News poll. Six in 10 Americans said she is honest and trustworthy.

Clinton has not announced she is running for President, and said Sunday that she wouldn’t make a decision until the end of the year. But amidst wide expectations that she’ll run again in 2016, 66% of Democratic-leaning voters said they would vote for Clinton in a presidential primary, according to the poll. Vice President Joe Biden would receive 12% of votes, while Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) would garner 7%.

In a general election pitting Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) against Clinton, Clinton would win with 53% of the vote, according to the poll.

TIME 2016 presidential election

Hillary Teases Timetable For 2016 Decision

Former Secretary of State tells ABC's Diane Sawyer she'll wait until this year's midterm elections are over before even thinking about running for president, but "will be on the way to making a decision by the end of the year"

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Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said Sunday she will be “on the way to making a decision” on a 2016 presidential run by the end of the year.

In an interview with ABC’s Diane Sawyer, due to be broadcast Monday, Clinton said she plans to campaign for Democratic candidates running in the 2014 midterms before making a decision on her own candidacy.

“I will be on the way to making a decision by the end of the year, yes,” she said. “Certainly not before then … I just want to kind of get through this year, travel around the country, sign books, help in the midterm elections in the fall, and then take a deep breath and kind of go through my pluses and minuses about what I will – and will not – be thinking about as I make the decision.”

The former First Lady, who has been consistently coy about her exact timetable for announcing a presidential run, said it was “probably likely” an announcement wouldn’t come until 2015. “I’m not positive about that, but I think, you know, the way I make decisions, that’s probably likely,” Clinton said.

An ABC poll releases Sunday shows that 69 percent of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents support Clinton for the party’s nomination.

Clinton, who is currently on a media tour to publicize her memoir Hard Choices, also called President Barack Obama’s decision to swap five Guantanamo prisoners for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl a “hard choice.”

“One of our values is we bring everybody home off the battlefield the best we can,” Clinton said. “It doesn’t matter how they ended up in a prisoner of war situation. It doesn’t matter. We bring our people home.”

[ABC]

TIME 2016 Election

5 Things to Know From Hillary Clinton’s New Book

Clinton on Bergdahl, Benghazi, bin Laden and more

CBS managed to pick up a copy of Hillary Clinton’s new book Hard Choices, which is scheduled for release June 10. Here are some of the choice revelations from the former secretary of state and possible 2016 presidential candidate.

Clinton knew the prisoner exchange for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl could be politically difficult back home

In every discussion about prisoners, we demanded the release of Army Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl, who had been captured in 2009. There would not be any agreement about prisoners without the sergeant coming home….

I acknowledged, as I had many times before, that opening the door to negotiations with the Taliban would be hard to swallow for many Americans after so many years of war.

Clinton remains defiant about investigations into the 2012 attack on the American consulate in Benghazi

It is unlikely that there will ever be anything close to full agreement on exactly what happened that night, how it happened, or why it happened. But that should not be confused with a lack of effort to discover the truth or to share it with the American people.

She was most proud of President Barack Obama on the day Osama bin Laden was killed

We watched on the video feed as the SEALs improvised, sweeping through the courtyard of the compound and heading inside to look for bin Laden. Contrary to some news reports and what you see in the movies, we had no means to see what was happening inside the building itself. All we could do was wait for an update from the team on the ground. I looked at the President. He was calm. Rarely have I been prouder to serve by his side as I was that day.

She doesn’t quite compare Russian President Vladimir Putin to Hitler, but…

He also proved over time to be thin-skinned and autocratic, resenting criticism and eventually cracking down on dissent and debate…

She says she was wrong to vote to authorize the Iraq War in 2003

I thought I had acted in good faith and made the best decision I could with the information I had. And I wasn’t alone in getting it wrong. But I still got it wrong. Plain and simple.

Meeting with Obama before the 2008 Democratic convention was like an “awkward first date”

We stared at each other like two teenagers on an awkward first date, taking a few sips of Chardonnay. … both Barack and I and our staffs had long lists of grievances. It was time to clear the air.

[CBS]

TIME 2016 presidential election

Hillary Clinton: I’ve ‘Moved On’ From Lewinsky Scandal

Courtesy of PEOPLE

In a wide-ranging interview with People magazine, the former Secretary of State said she is looking beyond the Lewinsky scandal

Hillary Clinton has said she’s “moved on” from the Monica Lewinsky scandal, in an exclusive interview with People magazine.

“I think everybody needs to look to the future,” Clinton said in an interview for People’s cover story, timed to coincide with the publication of her memoir Hard Choices.

It’s the first time the former Secretary of State has spoken publicly about the affair since the scandal was resuscitated in recent months.

When Clinton was asked about reports that she called Monica Lewinsky a “narcissistic loony toon” after the affair became public, Clinton said “I’m not going to comment on what did and didn’t happen.”

Read more at People.

TIME 2016 presidential election

Donald Trump: Politicians ‘All Bull****’

Businessman Donald Trump speaks at the inaugural Freedom Summit meeting in Manchester, New Hampshire
Donald Trump speaks at the inaugural Freedom Summit meeting for conservative speakers in Manchester, New Hampshire, April 12, 2014. Lucas Jackson—Reuters

Taking a potshot at the profession he may wish to join

Billionaire business mogul Donald Trump, perhaps priming his pitch for a possible 2016 presidential run, ended up digging on politicians at large during a conservative gathering Saturday.

“We need somebody who’s gonna get things done, and politicians are all talk and no action,” Trump said while speaking at a New Hampshire conservative meeting organized by Americans for Prosperity and Citizens United.

“All talk, it’s all bull—-,” Trump added.

The real estate magnate trumpeted his own achievements improving an ice-skating rink in New York City’s Central Park, reported The Hill, and mentioned his own plans to turn the Old Post Office in Washington, D.C. into a “tremendous hotel.”

“We need to make our country rich again,” Trump said at the event, which also featured Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas and Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky. Trump said he is “taking a hard look” at making another presidential bid in 2016.

[The Hill]

TIME 2016 presidential election

Jeb Bush Will Decide on 2016 Presidential Bid This Year

Jeb Bush
Peter Foley—Bloomberg/Getty Images

At an event celebrating the 25th anniversary of his father's term in the White House, the former Florida governor said he would make up his mind about running before the end of the year, reports the Washington Post

Former Florida governor Jeb Bush has said he will decide by the end of the year whether he will run for President in 2016.

The son of former President George H.W. Bush and younger brother of former President George W. Bush gave a long statement at an event marking 25 years since his father’s presidency about a potential presidential bid, saying his decision would ultimately rest on whether a candidate in 2016 can “run with a hopeful, optimistic message, hopefully with enough detail to give people a sense that it’s not just idle words and not get back into the vortex of the mud fight,” the Washington Post reports.

At the event, which was moderated by Fox News, Bush also said he was weighing the pressure a presidential run would place on his family, saying running a campaign would be a “huge sacrifice.” Bush also cited a grueling primary struggle as a consideration about whether to run.

Donors have already begun courting Bush and his aides and planning a possible fundraising strategy as speculation increases around presidential hopefuls like Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky, Governor Chris Christie of New Jersey and Texas Governor Rick Perry.

[Washington Post]

TIME Hillary Clinton

The (Not Very) Quiet Campaign for Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton Speaks At UN International Women's Day Event
Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton leaves an event at the U.N. in New York City on March 7, 2014 Andrew Burton—Getty Images

Exclusive: An army is forming for the Democratic front-runner should the former Secretary of State decide to run for president in 2016, but the groups' leaders are keeping a safe distance -- and Clinton is glad to have the space

Far from being just another aide to Hillary and Bill Clinton, Craig Smith is something of an adopted son. He worked for the pair in Arkansas, was the very first hire for Bill’s 1992 presidential run, followed them to the White House and then advised both the 1996 and 2008 campaigns. But in recent months, Smith and his mentors haven’t been talking. “Look, I’ve known these people for over 30 years,” he says. “Being in a situation where I can’t talk to them is a little odd. But, you know, it is what it is.”

The reason for the distance is Smith’s current role as a senior adviser for Ready for Hillary, a super PAC that has been set up to organize the grassroots for a 2016 Clinton presidential effort should she run. Super PACs cannot under federal rules coordinate certain types of spending or fundraising with candidates. Smith has interpreted this broadly, cutting off all direct ties to the former First Couple. “Our goal is to build the Ferrari of grassroots operations,” Smith says. “All we need is a driver ready to hit the gas.”

It’s not wholly as hands-off as all that; the back-and-forth is just carefully choreographed. In recent weeks, Clinton has told friends she is grateful for the Ready for Hillary effort, follows its activities closely and believes it is building exactly the kind of foundation she never erected — but discovered she needed — in her race against Barack Obama in 2008. The ­super PAC, meanwhile, has been telegraphing messages to Clinton in plain sight. When people without obvious ties to the Clintons are hired for the group, they are often announced in press releases containing testimonials from someone in the Clintons’ orbit — a move intended to ensure that Hillary will be comfortable with the choice.

(MORE: Clinton Super PAC Ready for Hillary Gets Readier)

As far as Smith is concerned, all systems are go: in the next few months, the group plans to sign up supporters in every state. Should Clinton personally offer endorsements in midterm contests — and it would be unusual if she did not — Ready for Hillary plans to rush in with fundraising assistance and foot soldiers. In other races, Clinton fans will be urged to promote Democrats up and down the ballot, fostering goodwill and, just as important, gaining practical experience that can be reprised later if Clinton jumps in.

There is now talk among Ready officials about finishing 2014 with 5 million supporters and 2 million active volunteers, numbers that would likely dwarf the assets of all the GOP wannabes combined. If realized, that would be substantially more than the piddling grassroots effort that Clinton mounted against Obama six years ago. Could anyone, Democrat or Republican, catch the Clinton machine this time? “I don’t know,” Smith says. “I think it takes a long time to build a grassroots operation. These things don’t pop up overnight.”

Indeed, they do not, and there is little that is spontaneous about this one. Smith estimates that the entire Clinton effort — including all the current super PAC ­projects and an actual campaign — will cost a cool $1.7 billion in total. That back-of-the-envelope calculation is based on his observation that in each presidential campaign the victor ends up spending about 150% of what the winner spent four years before.

The other boost for Ready for Hillary has come from Obama’s political machine. Inside Obama world, the battle scars of the 2008 nomination fight have faded, and there is widespread excitement about a Clinton candidacy; her service in the Administration has made her the clear, if unofficial, legatee. “I have yet to meet anybody — grassroots, donor or elected official — who is not enthusiastically for her,” says one of Obama’s top strategists. “The loyalty thing has played a huge role in the difference between support and enthusiastic support.”

(VIDEO: Hillary Clinton Kicks Off International Women’s Day at the U.N.)

Obama’s advisers have had to reassure the President that the early embrace of Clinton by his far-flung team is a good thing. He has fretted to aides about the leadership role his campaign manager Jim Messina has taken on in another pro-Clinton super PAC, Priorities USA Action, and worried that the early organizing might distract from his effort to limit losses in the looming midterm election. Obama is also aware that the rush to Clinton could diminish his Vice President’s standing and hurt some feelings, whether Joe Biden runs or not.

Meanwhile, the current First Lady maintains a steadfast eye on her husband’s legacy — short term and long — say advisers who have discussed politics with her recently. Michelle Obama is determined that the party choose the strongest contender possible to keep the White House in Democratic hands after her husband departs, and aides say she has her ear close to the ground. Of course, no one expects a public endorsement anytime soon. But like practically everyone else around the President, Michelle has made it clear she believes Clinton looks like the best choice now.

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