TIME Supreme Court

What’s at Stake as the Supreme Court Returns to Gay Marriage

Supreme Court Gay Marriage
Andrew Harnik—AP An American flag and a rainbow colored flag flies in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, April 27, 2015, as the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments on the constitutionality of state bans on same-sex marriage on Tuesday.

The fight over gay marriage may be nearing an end

Just two years ago, the Supreme Court debated the constitutional implications of same-sex marriage. As it returned to the issue Tuesday, the underlying facts that it will take into consideration have changed substantially.

When the court heard arguments on two cases in March of 2013, gay marriage was still a live issue. Just 11 states recognized same-sex marriage, while a majority of Americans had only recently begun to tell pollsters that they approved.

Today, 37 states recognize gay marriage, many of which did so after federal judges took the logic of the Supreme Court’s previous rulings further. The trend toward acceptance has only solidified, reaching a record 61 percent of Americans in one recent poll.

The justices themselves have personally mirrored this trend, with liberal Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Elena Kagan officiating at gay weddings since the last decision.

Court watchers predict that a slim majority of justices — led by swing vote Anthony Kennedy — will finish what they started two years ago, finding a way to get all 50 states to recognize gay marriage. The question, then, is how they will do so.

The case they are considering, Obergefell v. Hodges, is named for James Obergefell, who married his now-deceased partner in Maryland, where gay marriage is legal, but cannot have his marriage recognized in Ohio, where it is not.

The court has several options to resolve the case. The justices could narrowly decide that states such as Ohio have to recognize marriage certificates from beyond their borders as a matter of legislative courtesy. Or they could more broadly decide that marriage is a constitutional right that no state may deny to gays and lesbians, forcing even reluctant states to issue same-sex marriage licenses of their own.

As with any court decision, there are a myriad of options in between, including multiple conflicting and overlapping opinions signed by different justices. But the underlying question will remain whether laws singling out gays and lesbians for different treatment—say, by barring them from marrying—deserve extra scrutiny in the same way that laws singling out ethnic or religious minorities do.

On that question, the Supreme Court has managed so far to avoid an answer, pegging opinions that expanded the equality of gays and lesbians on different arguments. It may do so again, or the justices may take the first step toward broader recognition of gay rights.

Either way, the fight over gay marriage may be nearing an end, but the debate over gay rights continues.

TIME White House

Here’s Everything You Want to Know About Tuesday’s State Dinner

Barack Obama, Shinzo Abe
Jacquelyn Martin—AP President Barack Obama hosts a state arrival ceremony for Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, April 28, 2015, on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington.

From what they'll eat to what they'll eat it on to who's singing after dinner

President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama will host their eighth state dinner on Tuesday with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his wife Akie.

Following a day of press conferences and pomp, the Obama’s will hold the dinner to “mirror the celebration of springtime in Washington, D.C..” The dinner itself is designed to show Japanese-American fusion, with guest chef Masharu Morimoto of Iron Chef fame, who was formally trained in Japan but grew to prominence at Nobu in New York.

It’ll be quite the affair, to say the least. And here’s everything you didn’t know you wanted to know about it.

The décor

The windows of 1600 Pennsylvania will be decorated with crystal curtains meant to embody both springtime rain and the fleeting beauty of the area’s cherry blossoms. Cherry blossoms have been sprucing up the National Mall at the beginning of spring since Japan gifted two trees to the United States in 1912. The more than 300 guests to Tuesday’s dinner will be served on new china outfitted with a band of “Kailua Blue,” chosen by the First Lady as a nod to the cool Pacific waters of Hawaii. The 11-piece setting also includes a recreation of decoration that appears on china purchased by President James Madison. The china will be used for the first time on Tuesday.

The meal

The Obamas will toast their guests with a round of Dassai 23 Junmai Daiginjo sake, a renowned brew of the rice-based alcohol. The first course is a “Toro Tartare and Caesar Sashimi Salad” that the White House says will come “wrapped in a clear acetate and tied with a Mizuhuki cord emulating a gift to be opened.” They’ll follow it up with a “Vegetable Consomme En Croute and Shikai Maki” and a Main Course of “American Wagyu Beef Tenderloin” served with spring vegetables and a 2010 Morlet Pinot Noir. For dessert, silken tofu and soymilk custard cake served with fresh fruit and syrup made from honey from the south grounds. They’ll end the meal with a “sip of tea,” a petit four formation styled in honor of Japanese tea and cherry blossoms.

The entertainment

The Obama’s will end Tuesday’s dinner party with a performance by the singers and stars of the Broadway hit-turned-film Jersey Boys. The film’s stars including Erich Bergen and Vincent Piazza will join John Lloyd Young, Michael Lomenda, and Tommy Faragher of stage productions in song.

The guests

TBD! The White House has not yet released the official guest list.

TIME

Morning Must Reads: April 28

Capitol
Mark Wilson—Getty Images The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC.

State of Emergency in ‘Charm City’

Days of angry but peaceful protests in Baltimore over the death of Freddie Gray spiraled after his funeral Monday into scenes of rioting, arson and looting that carried into Tuesday, prompting a declaration of a state of emergency as reinforcements arrived to restore order

Global Aid to Nepal Ramps Up

As the death toll from Saturday’s 7.8-magnitude quake surpasses 4,350, aid agencies and governments are scrambling to deliver assistance

Apple’s Record-Shattering Quarter

The tech giant beat Wall Street’s expectations in delivering its best second quarter numbers ever: $58 billion in revenue, up 27% over 2014

Loretta Lynch Sworn In as 83rd Attorney General

Loretta Lynch officially became the 83rd Attorney General of the U.S. after a historically long wait of more than 150 days. “It’s about time this woman is being sworn in,” Vice President Joe Biden said

Women Earn 24% Less Than Men, U.N. Report Finds

The U.N. Women report shows that even though more women are in the workplace and taking on leadership positions worldwide, pay levels are nowhere near reaching equality worldwide. The report finds women earn just half of the income men earn over a lifetime

Projected NFL 1st-Round Pick Shane Ray Cited for Weed

Former Missouri Tiger football player Shane Ray, projected to be drafted early in the 2015 NFL draft, was cited on Monday for possession of marijuana and a traffic violation. He was given a misdemeanor but was not detained

Viola Davis Will Play Harriet Tubman in HBO Biopic

Oscar-nominated actress Viola Davis will play Harriet Tubman in an HBO Films and Amblin TV production. The untitled project is based on Kate Clifford Larson’s book Bound for the Promised Land, the 2003 biographic novel on the Civil War–era abolitionist

Audi Invents Fuel Made From Carbon Dioxide and Water

An Audi research facility in Dresden, Germany, managed to create the first batches of diesel fuel with a net-zero carbon footprint made from carbon dioxide, water and renewable energy sources such as wind or solar power

Coffins Arrive at Indonesian Prison as Executions Near

Ambulances carrying coffins arrived on Tuesday at a prison island, and relatives paid final visits to their condemned loved ones in a sign that Indonesia will imminently execute eight foreigners and one Indonesian man, despite an international outcry

Lifetime Is Making an ‘Unauthorized’ Full House TV Movie

Hot on the heels of Netflix’s reboot, Lifetime is developing a TV movie that goes behind the scenes of the beloved sitcom. The Unauthorized Full House Story will reportedly chronicle the cast’s lives off-screen, from good times to bad

South Korea Ferry Captain Gets Life in Prison

The South Korean ferry captain responsible for last year’s disaster that killed more than 300 people, mostly schoolchildren, was given an increased sentence of life in prison on Tuesday by an appellate court that convicted him of homicide

‘Food Babe’ Blogger Vani Hari Takes Heat Over Health Science

The former management consultant turned healthy-living activist has been criticized for mistakes stemming from her Food Babe blog, which champions nutrition causes based on questionable science and evidence

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TIME justice

Evangelicals Divided as Supreme Court Considers Gay Marriage

Supreme Court Gay Marriage
Andrew Harnik—AP A rainbow colored flag flies in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, April 27, 2015, as the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments on the constitutionality of state bans on same-sex marriage on Tuesday.

A longtime opponent of same-sex marriage, Pastor Samuel Rodriguez gave a benediction at the last Republican National Convention, sits on the executive board of the National Association of Evangelicals and will host two likely presidential candidates, Jeb Bush and Mike Huckabee, at a gathering of 1,000 Hispanic leaders in Texas on Wednesday.

But if you ask the founder of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference how Republicans should react if the U.S. Supreme Court decides to legalize gay marriage nationwide this year, he doesn’t toe a very hard line. “The Republican position will not be, ‘We will fight arduously to turn back what the Supreme Court has ruled,’ ” he said. “I don’t think you will hear that at all, as a matter of fact.”

Some of Rodriguez’s fellow Republican and social conservative leaders agree, but not all. In fact, it’s hard to find a single strategic plan for opponents of same-sex marriage, many of whom plan to gather Tuesday at the Supreme Court, where the justices will meet for the second time in two years to debate the constitutionality of gay and lesbian marriage bans. The case could lead to a decision that would outlaw same-sex marriage bans this June.

Tony Perkins, the head of the conservative Family Research Council, says that if the court rules in favor of same-sex marriage, the proper strategy is to mount a campaign against judicial overreach modeled after the pro-life campaign against the court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, which found women had a constitutional right to an abortion. Decades after the decision, opponents of abortion continue to make legislative gains in statehouses across the country. “That issue is far from resolved and this will continue to be an issue in the political world from presidential races all the way down,” Perkins says.

Others like Russell Moore, the president of the Southern Baptist Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, say that the right move is to elevate the issue of marriage in the coming Republican primary contest. “From our view a bad decision will only reinforce how important it is to elect candidates who are going to be wise in appointing judges and justices,” Moore told TIME. “I don’t think a candidate who supports gay marriage could be nominated by the Republican Party right now.”

There is a third group of Christian leaders that have been encouraging even more drastic action: An effort by governors and legislatures to resist a Supreme Court ruling that strikes down bans on same-sex marriage. “Lincoln did not enforce Dred Scott decision,” Huckabee wrote in a recent email distributed by evangelical activist David Lane, referencing a court decision on slavery that helped spark the Civil War. “[A]nd there are several cases where Presidents (Jefferson and Jackson for example, which must be a challenge to Dems who celebrate Jefferson/Jackson Dinners) determined that the courts were wrong and refused to surrender to one of the three branches of government.”

“I’m stunned at the sitting Senators and Governors (Republican no less) who act as if when the SCOTUS rules, it’s forever settled,” Huckabee continued, using an acronym for the Supreme Court of the United States. “The 3 branches are EQUAL. The judicial cannot make nor enforce law.”

Read more: New Strategy Against Gay Marriage Divides 2016 Field

Those views could make for some interesting conversation among participants at Rodriguez’s conference this week. For Rodriguez, who has also been focused on issues like prison and immigration reform, the best strategy forward is to move away from the court’s decision and to start working to protect religious people and institutions who will continue to define marriage as between a man and a woman. “The major pivot will be social conservatives will say, ‘The future of American Christianity is at stake,’” Rodriguez said. “We have been labeled as bigots and homophobes when we are not, and oh boy, this election is about religious liberty and the future of American Christianity.”

But that vision assumes social conservatives speak with one voice, an outcome that is far from certain on the eve of Supreme Court arguments.

TIME ted cruz

What the Flap Over a Ted Cruz Fundraiser Means

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks during a town hall event at Morningside College in Sioux City, Iowa on April 1, 2015.
Nati Harnik—AP Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks during a town hall event at Morningside College in Sioux City, Iowa on April 1, 2015.

This is a short parable about the polarized state of American politics.

A Republican candidate holds a fundraiser one Monday evening at the home of two gay businessmen. It is an unusual pairing: the businessmen are prominent gay-rights activists, while the politician is a prominent opponent of same-sex marriage. But they have similar views on Israel and decide that’s enough to set aside those differences.

By Thursday, the politician, under pressure from supporters, releases a defensive statement. His spokesman says the venue was an error.

By Sunday both businessmen, facing boycotts and vitriol from their allies, post apologies on Facebook, calling the event “a terrible mistake.”

The politician is Ted Cruz, the Texas Senator seeking the Republican presidential nomination in 2016. The businessmen are Mati Weiderpass and Ian Reisner, New York hoteliers who own properties in Manhattan and off Long Island that are geared toward gay guests. The swift backlash from their shared dinner says as much as any tale about our factionalized politics, in which anyone who appears to stray from tribal alliances faces the prospect of excommunication.

In some ways, the most surprising aspect of the summit was that either party was surprised by the blowback. Both sides cast a classic political transaction — the exchange of money for proximity to power — as a function of mutual support for Israel. “It was all things Israel,” Cruz spokesman Rick Tyler told the Washington Examiner. “They were in a discussion about something they all agreed about.”

But Cruz’s path to the presidency runs through Iowa, where evangelical activists who oppose gay marriage dominate the state’s first-in-the-nation caucuses. An ardent social conservative, Cruz is seeking a constitutional amendment that would protect the right of states to define marriage as an institution between one man and one woman.

A New York Times report that Cruz took a conciliatory tone on marriage during the dinner appeared to jeopardize his outreach to social conservatives. It didn’t help that the fundraiser was held in a swank duplex abutting Central Park, where a 23-year-old gay man was found dead in a bathtub in an apparent drug overdose last fall, according to police sources.

Cruz released a statement to reporters decrying the flap as a media witch hunt. “When asked, I stated directly and unambiguously what everyone in the room already knew, that I oppose gay marriage and I support traditional marriage,” he said. “One person further asked how [Cruz’s wife] Heidi and I would react if we found out one of our (4- and 7-year-old) daughters were gay. My reply: ‘We would love her with all our hearts. We love our daughters unconditionally.’

“A conservative Republican who is willing to meet with individuals who do not agree on marriage and who loves his daughters unconditionally may not reflect the caricature of conservatives promoted by the left, but it’s hardly newsworthy,” he added.

If Cruz opted for damage control through defiance, Reisner and Weiderpass were more chastened. Gay rights activists, who argue opposition to same-sex marriage is intolerance, were furious with the hoteliers’ decision to host Cruz. Over several days last week, the two were hit with the threat of business boycotts, canceled events and a protest rally. On Sunday, they took to Facebook to issue separate apologies.

“I am shaken to my bones by the e-mails, texts, postings and phone calls of the past few days,” Reisner wrote. “I was ignorant, naive and much too quick in accepting a request to co-host a dinner with Cruz at my home without taking the time to completely understand all of his positions on gay rights.”

“I share in Ian’s remorse. I, too, lay humbled with what has happened in the last week,” Weiderpass wrote in a separate post. “I made a terrible mistake. Unfortunately, I cannot undo this. You taught me a painful but important lesson.”

The post doesn’t specify what lesson he learned. But the larger moral of the parable seems clear: in American politics today, what keeps us apart matters more than what brings us together.

TIME Department of Justice

Loretta Lynch Sworn In as 83rd Attorney General

“It’s about time this woman is being sworn in,” Vice President Joe Biden said Monday

After a historically long wait, Loretta Lynch officially became the 83rd Attorney General of the U.S. on Monday.

“It’s about time this woman is being sworn in,” Vice President Joe Biden said Monday at Lynch’s ceremony. With her husband and father — who recently celebrated his 83rd birthday — by her side, Lynch took the oath of office to become the first African-American woman to hold the position.

And despite the lengthy wait that defined her nomination process and led to harsh words from President Obama for congressional Republicans, Lynch came across as humbled and gracious during her remarks as the nation’s newly minted top prosecutor.

“It would be an understatement to say my heart is full, but it is,” Lynch said Monday.

She thanked Obama and Biden for “believing in me.” She thanked Senators Patrick Leahy and Chuck Schumer for “making the floor of the United States Senate a welcoming place.” She thanked her father, who had become a bit of a mainstay throughout the nomination process, appearing at every hearing to support his daughter. She also thanked the throngs of people who demanded a swift confirmation of her post, even though the process was all-but swift.

In the end, she said the one thing that her swearing in made clear is that anything is possible for the Department of Justice.

“If a little girl from North Carolina who used to tell her grandfather in the fields to lift her up on the back of his mule … ‘way up high, granddaddy’ can grow up to become the attorney general of the United States of America,” she said, “we can do anything.”

TIME trade

Meet the Critics of President Obama’s Trade Deal

Barack Obama speaks at a ceremony at CIA headquarters in McLean, Va. on April 24, 2015.
Kevin Dietsch—dpa/Corbis Barack Obama speaks at a ceremony at CIA headquarters in McLean, Va. on April 24, 2015.

Republicans in Congress are poised to give President Obama broad powers to cement a legacy-defining free trade deal with Pacific countries.

Backed by major conservative and business groups, bills to grant the president fast-track authority passed through Republican-led House and Senate committees last week with enough Senate Democratic support for eventual passage, unless the bill changes dramatically on its way to a final vote or Republican support crumbles.

Not every member of the GOP on Capitol Hill is gung ho about the idea. It’s unclear exactly how many, but estimates of GOP opponents range from as few as a dozen to two dozen to as many as 60, according to various news reports. The lower estimates are likely not enough, but the higher ones could sink the bill, which is designed to allow Obama to sign the Trans Pacific Partnership, a 12-country trade deal that would affect about a third of the world’s trade.

Critics fear that fast-track authority would further exacerbate income inequality and cut deeper into a manufacturing sector that bled millions of jobs last decade. Ohio Rep. David Joyce said he doesn’t understand why his fellow Republicans support trade promotion authority (or TPA) — which would limit debate in Congress by allowing the president to negotiate deals that could only be voted up or down without amendment — when they oppose Obama’s negotiations on Iran’s nuclear weapons program.

“I find it sort of humorous that they don’t trust the president on Iran or anything else but they’ll trust him with TPA, which I think could really do severe damage to our country and to manufacturing as a whole,” says Joyce, who counts himself among about a dozen GOP opponents.

Tucked in between Cleveland and Akron and spread into the northeast tip of the state, Joyce’s district boasts a manufacturing economy composed of 1,500 companies responsible for around 65,400 jobs and $930 million in wages, according to his office. “I never believed the president had this authority to begin with,” says Joyce. “So you start with that premise. And then in the last 28 months as I’ve worked the district, I’ve learned more and more manufacturers say this just hasn’t worked for us.”

Some pro-trade economists criticize opponents like Joyce for listening to politically active but less important sectors of their state. Two of the top five industries that gave the most money to Joyce’s reelection campaign last year were manufacturing companies and transportation unions, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. And while the manufacturing sector employs about 13 percent of his state’s workforce, Ohio Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown, a fierce TPA opponent, tells TIME that the industry “matters to us as much or more than other state in the country.”

“I’m sure Ohio thinks of itself as a manufacturing state,” says Gary Clyde Hufbauer, senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. “It’s not. Nobody is today. Manufacturing is down to about 11% of employment in the U.S.”

“There are many strong service industries in the US which will export abroad who are totally underrepresented in the political debate,” he adds. “The political debate is all centered on manufacturing and agriculture. And services, which is two thirds of our economy, is pretty well forgotten.”

The TPP deal the Administration has been negotiating for nearly five years would affect a broad swath of international law concerning a host of issues including those concerning labor, the environment, intellectual property, agriculture, data exclusivity and investor-state arbitration among others. Peter Petri, a Brandeis University professor of international finance whose models have been used by the Chamber of Commerce, says that the Trans Pacific Partnership will set the “benchmark” for global trade rules in relatively new areas in the services, investment and internet industries in which America has a competitive advantage.

“Global rules are becoming steadily less relevant in these areas because they were negotiated 20 years ago,” Petri tells TIME. “So we are heading for anarchy of sorts, with big countries deciding on an ad hoc basis on how to deal with each new technology, transaction and company, based on their narrow, short-term advantage. For the US, this may mean keeping a few more jobs in low-wage industries, but it will frustrate our most important global industries, and probably weaken the world economy for everyone.”

But even by Petri’s calculations the macroeconomic effect for the trade deal would be modest, adding about $77 billion per year to U.S. real incomes by 2025. And there will be winners — sophisticated equipment manufacturers for everything from turbines to medical equipment to heavy earth-moving machines — and losers, including producers of furniture and basic consumer electronics, according to Hufbauer. A Peterson Institute study says the U.S. manufacturing sector will contract by $44 billion, while companies in the services industry will expand by $79 billion.

Brown, who wears a canary in a cage pin to display his solidarity with workers’ rights, argues that TPP will be a disaster, with broad, long-lasting negative consequences for both his state and country.

“Fundamentally what these trade agreements have done is encouraged companies to follow business plans, which were sort of unknown until 20 years ago, where you shut down production in Steubenville or Toledo and move it to Wuhan or Mexico City and sell the products back into the United States,” says Brown.

“They talk about increased exports, but that’s a lot like saying well the Tigers got 5 runs, but the Indians got 7,” adds Brown of the United States Trade Representative office, which has been lobbying Democrats. “So you’ve got to talk exports-imports and every trade agreement we pass, we end up losing more jobs — good-paying manufacturing jobs, often union jobs, sometimes not.”

The debate will only heat up in next several weeks when TPA heads to the floor of the Senate and House. While Boehner and other Republicans in leadership continue to push the bill, Brown will headline an AFL-CIO event in Cleveland on May 4 in protest. Meanwhile Joyce will lay low — he doesn’t plan on attending any trade-specific events back home next week.

TIME 2016 Election

Clinton Foundation CEO Admits ‘We Made Mistakes’

Melinda Gates, Clinton Foundation Release Report On Status Of Women And Girls
Spencer Platt—Getty Images Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton joins her daughter and Clinton Foundation Vice Chair Chelsea Clinton (L) for the official release of the No Ceilings Full Participation Report which coincides with the start of the 59th session of the United Nations' Commission on the Status of Women on March 9, 2015 in New York City.

Interim chief executive Maura Pally seeks to staunch growing controversy on donor disclosures

The Clinton family’s controversial charity foundation on Sunday defended its transparency and overall track record amidst growing scrutiny of its donors, even while conceding in a statement that it made “mistakes” in its operations.

A soon-to-be-published book by conservative author Peter Schweizer claims that some foreign and corporate donors benefitted from special treatment by Hillary Clinton’s State Department after donating millions to the philanthropy, and attention has turned recently to misfiled tax forms.

In a statement posted on the Clinton Foundation’s website, interim CEO Maura Pally said information misfiled in tax forms was disclosed elsewhere on the website. “Yes, we made mistakes, as many organizations of our size do, but we are acting quickly to remedy them, and have taken steps to ensure they don’t happen in the future,” she said. On the issue of why Canadian donors’ names weren’t published on the site, Pally pointed to a Canadian law that prohibits charities from disclosing individual donors without donors’ permission.

She also touted the philanthropy’s accomplishments, including combating climate change, lowering the price of HIV/AIDS-fighting drugs, among others. Despite the controversy, the Foundation’s commitment to transparency is “stronger than ever,” Pally said.

“When Hillary Clinton was appointed Secretary of State, we took unprecedented steps to avoid potential conflicts of interest by going above and beyond what is required of any philanthropy and instituted voluntarily annual disclosure of all of our donors on our website,” Pally said.

Even as Hillary Clinton and her allies showcase the Foundation’s philanthropic activities around the world, the $1-billion Clinton Foundation threatens to become an albatross to Hillary Clinton’s campaign to win the presidency in 2016.

Read more: Clinton Allies Knock Down Donor Allegations, New Questions Pop Up

TIME 2016 Election

Jeb Bush Claims to Have Raised Record Funds

Jeb Bush
Seth Wenig—AP Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush speaks to reporters as he leaves an event in New York City on April 23, 2015.

Bush did not name a specific figure, the New York Times reports

Jeb Bush, a front-runner for the Republican presidential nomination in 2016, told donors at a Miami fundraiser over the weekend that he believed his allies have raised more money in 100 days than any other modern political operation in his party.

Citing unnamed sources who heard his remarks, the New York Times reports that Bush offered no specific figure but the total is expected to be in the “high tens of millions of dollars.” Though he has not officially announced his candidacy, the former Florida governor has a deep network of donors and is set to be a daunting contender in the presidential primary.

Read more: Jeb Bush: Next in Line

Bush is raising money primarily through his super PAC, a type of political operation created in the wake of the Citizens United Supreme Court decision that can collect unlimited funds but can’t coordinate political activities with candidates.

Until he officially declares his candidacy, however, Bush can direct the spending of his super PAC.

[NYT]

Read next: Longtime Marco Rubio–Jeb Bush Alliance Fades in GOP Contest

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME

Morning Must Reads: April 27

Capitol
Mark Wilson—Getty Images The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC.

Kathmandu on Edge

Aftershocks rattled Nepal on Sunday, sending much of Kathmandu into the streets one day after a magnitude-7.8 earthquake left more than 3,617 people dead, from the capital to small villages to Mount Everest, where an avalanche killed at least 18 people

Baltimore Calm After Protests

The city remained largely quiet on Sunday after violent protests over the death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old who died in police custody

Hackers Read Obama Emails

Russian hackers reportedly read some of President Obama’s personal emails when they breached White House systems last year

Jay Z Defends Tidal in Series of Tweets

Jay Z doesn’t tweet very often, but with all the flak that his recently launched artist-owned music-streaming service Tidal is getting, the rap mogul felt the need to counter all the haters, launching into a Twitter spree to defend the service

Ex-Players Angered by NFL Concussion Settlement

The exclusion from a legal settlement of chronic traumatic encephalopathy has angered many former players. Dozens have now opted out of the concussion lawsuit with the NFL, giving them the option of bringing future litigation against the league

Furious 7 Is Now Bigger ThanFrozen

The film starring Vin Diesel and the late Paul Walker is the first since 2012 — and one of only 29 films, ever — to keep the No. 1 box-office spot for four weeks. It has earned more than $1 billion worldwide but could be dethroned with the opening ofAvengers

Clinton Foundation Admits Missteps in Donor Disclosure

The acting chief executive of the Clinton Foundation is acknowledging the global philanthropy made mistakes in how it disclosed its donors amid growing scrutiny as Hillary Rodham Clinton opens her presidential campaign

Amy Winehouse Doc ‘Misleading,’ Says Late Singer’s Family

The family of late singer Amy Winehouse has fiercely criticized a new documentary movie of her life for being “unbalanced” and “misleading.” Titled Amy, the movie is slated to have its debut screening at the Cannes Film Festival in May

Indonesia Set to Execute Foreign Drug Smugglers

Indonesian media report that nine coffins, covered in white cloth, have already been taken to the police station in the Javanese town of Cilacap, near Nusakambangan island, where the convicts are being kept and where they will be shot

Film Shows Dad’s Effort to Honor His Son’s Short Life

When a Colorado father’s 1-year-old was diagnosed with brain cancer in 2010, he began to make a video game that would honor his son’s life and give others a peek into the family’s reality of living with a child who would die too soon

Los Angeles Airport Security Boosted Amid ISIS Threat

Security is being stepped up in Los Angeles, its area airports and other parts of Southern California amid new ISIS-related threats calling for attacks on uniformed personnel. Investigators said they were not aware of a specific plot

Laverne Cox Urges Better Treatment of Transgender People

Laverne Cox, transgender activist and star ofOrange Is the New Black, told TIME, “We need more of what’s happening in the media in terms of visibility to affect policies and how we treat transgender folks”

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