TIME 2016 Election

Fox News Sets Republican Debate Roster

Ohio Gov. John Kasich and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie made the cut, former Texas Gov. Rick Perry did not

The final roster for the first Republican presidential debate is set.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and Ohio Gov. John Kasich squeaked onstage as the final members of the field of 10, Fox News announced Tuesday afternoon, while former Texas Gov. Rick Perry narrowly missed the cut and will be relegated to an undercard forum.

Businessman Donald Trump will hold center stage at the inaugural GOP 2016 debate Thursday in Cleveland, Fox said, flanked by former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker.

The network, which established the criteria for invitation, averaged the five most recent national polls of Republican primary voters to determine which 10 candidates would make the 9 p.m. main debate stage. The second tier will participate in an earlier forum at 5 p.m.

Rounding out the top 10 are former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, Sen. Marco Rubio, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, Sen. Rand Paul, Sen. Ted Cruz, Chris Christie and Kasich.

Missing the cut is a blow for Perry, who has seen his support slip in recent surveys. Candidates on the bubble have spent much of the past two weeks on Fox News and other national outlets in an effort to boost their chances of making the debate.

The debate selection criteria has drawn criticism from those left off the stage, like former Sen. Rick Santorum and Sen. Lindsey Graham, as well as political scientists and pollsters who argue that averaging national polls without considering their margins of error is flawed.

Fox lowered the threshold for entrance to the first forum last week, from candidates polling at 1% in national polls to all those whose names are consistently offered on primary surveys. The change ensured that Graham, former HP CEO Carly Fiorina, and Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal would be onstage for the secondary forum.

TIME Donald Trump

How Donald Trump’s Wealth Helps Him With Republican Voters

Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump visits his Scottish golf course Turnberry on July 30, 2015 in Ayr, Scotland.
Jeff J Mitchell—2015 Getty Images Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump visits his Scottish golf course Turnberry on July 30, 2015 in Ayr, Scotland.

Donald Trump chose the right party when he decided to run for the Republican presidential nomination.

A CBS News poll released Tuesday showed that registered Republicans are more likely than their Democratic counterparts to back candidates who are spending their own money on a campaign.

According to the poll, almost one-third of registered Republican voters said they prefer a candidate who “pays for their campaign by using their own personal wealth,” while only about one-fourth of registered Democratic voters who said the same.

There was a similar gap over candidates who seek political donations, with fewer registered Republicans preferring candidates who raise money from donations. But similar majorities of Republicans, Democrats and independents said it doesn’t matter to them how candidates fund their campaigns.

Trump has played up the independence that self-funding gives his campaign.

“I don’t need anybody’s money,” he said at his campaign launch in June. “I’m using my own money. I’m not using the lobbyists. I’m not using donors. I don’t care. I’m really rich.”

According to data from the Campaign Finance Institute, a nonpartisan think tank, 49 of the 69 candidates who spent at least $1 million of their own money in races for the U.S. House and Senate between 2010 and 2012 were Republicans.

The poll showed Trump leading the Republican field with 24 percent support, followed by former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, who had 13 percent.

 

TIME jeb bush

Hillary Clinton Criticizes Jeb Bush Remarks on Women’s Health

Republican presidential candidate and former Florida governor Jeb Bush speaks to workers at Thumbtack on July 16, 2015 in San Francisco, California.
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images Republican presidential candidate and former Florida governor Jeb Bush speaks to workers at Thumbtack on July 16, 2015 in San Francisco, California.

He later said he misspoke

Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush was trying to defuse Democratic criticism of defunding Planned Parenthood Tuesday when he accidentally opened up a new line of attack.

During an interview at a conference of Southern Baptists, Bush called for defunding Planned Parenthood, then tried to counter the expected Democratic arguments against it by suggesting the money could be redirected to other community health organizations.

But mid-thought, he stopped to muse that the federal government might not need to spend as much as it does.

“The argument against this is … it is a war on women and you are attacking women’s health issues,” he said. “You could take dollar for dollar—although I’m not sure we need a half a billion dollars for women’s health issues—but if you took dollar for dollar, there are many extraordinarily fine organizations, community health organizations that exist.”

That parenthetical thought bounced around on Twitter, where Clinton responded.

Some conservatives also criticized Bush for giving Democrats an easy opening.

On Monday, Senate Democrats blocked a Republican proposal to defund Planned Parenthood, although some GOP senators have vowed to find other ways to strip the organization of the more than $500 million in federal funding it receives to help run around 700 health clinics. Some have even suggested a government shutdown to force the issue.

Bush did not say whether he’d back a shutdown, instead saying he prefers “regular order.”

“I don’t know how many times we have had government shutdowns and budgets not passed,” he said. “If I am president we are going to respect the Constitution and get back to regular order way where democracy works again, where you submit a budget and you work with Congress, you pass a budget, and in that budget I can promise you there will not be $500 million going to Planned Parenthood.”

The debate has come after a series of undercover videos released by a group of anti-abortion activists showed Planned Parenthood officials and others who work with the organization discussing fetal tissue donation. Republicans argue that the videos show the organization breaking federal law, while Planned Parenthood says they are deceptively edited and merely show officials discussing legally permissible reimbursements for minor costs.

The Bush campaign issued a clarification early Tuesday evening which said that he “misspoke” and that he supports fully funding the “countless community health centers, rural clinics and other women’s health organizations” that serve low-income women.

“I was referring to the hard-to-fathom $500 million in federal funding that goes to Planned Parenthood – an organization that was callously participating in the unthinkable practice of selling fetal organs,” Bush said in the statement.

TIME celebrities

Kelly Osbourne Causes Outrage After Latino Gaffe On The View

Logo's "Trailblazer Honors" 2015 - Arrivals
Santiago Felipe—Getty Images Kelly Osbourne attends Logo TV's "Trailblazers" at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine on June 25, 2015 in New York City.

"If you kick every Latino out of this country, then who is going to be cleaning your toilet, Donald Trump?"

Social media exploded in outrage after Fashion Police host Kelly Osbourne tried to defend Latinos from presidential candidate Donald Trump on Tuesday morning’s episode of The View, but ended up offending many of them instead.

“If you kick every Latino out of this country, then who is going to be cleaning your toilet, Donald Trump?” she responded when asked about what she thought about Trump’s controversial remarks on Mexican immigrants. The candidate previous said that Mexican immigrants are “bringing drugs, bringing crime,” and that “they’re rapists.”

The View co-host Rosie Perez jumped in as Osbourne stammered: “There’s more jobs than that in the country for Latinos, and Latinos are not the only people who clean toilets.”

Twitter quickly joined the conversation with a hashtag, #QueridaKellyOsbourne (Dear Kelly Osbourne).

Update: Osbourne responded to the outcry on her Facebook page:

 

TIME 2016 Election

Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio Face an Evangelical Test

2016 Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush addresses central Florida pastors at a meet-and-greet hosted by the Centro Internacional de la Familia church in Orlando, Fla., on Monday, July 27, 2015.
Orlando Sentinel—TNS via Getty Images 2016 Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush addresses central Florida pastors at a meet-and-greet hosted by the Centro Internacional de la Familia church in Orlando, Fla., on Monday, July 27, 2015.

Two days before the first Republican presidential debate, former Florida governor Jeb Bush and U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio face a different popularity test: 13,000 evangelicals in Nashville.

Russell Moore, president of the Southern Baptist Convention’s policy arm, will interview Bush on stage Tuesday afternoon at the Send North America conference, one of the country’s largest summer church gatherings. Moore will also show a video of an interview he pre-taped with Rubio. Other leading presidential candidates, including former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, were invited to participate, Moore’s team says, but only Bush and Rubio accepted the invite.

The Send North America Conference is not a political event. It is a missions conference, hosted by the Southern Baptist Convention’s mission boards, and a forum for evangelicals and Baptists to deepen the ways they evangelize, even if they are not pastors or professional missionaries. Most presentations have nothing to do with politics. Keynote speaker pastor J.D. Greear of The Summit Church in North Carolina, for example, gave a keynote speech exploring how his church aims to start 1,000 new churches by 2050. Only 10% of conference participants are pastors, and more than two-thirds are male.

Moore, who has been an advocate in the recent push to defund Planned Parenthood, is hosting the interview at a missions conference so evangelicals can decide how to make presidential politics part of their own personal Christian mission.

“These candidates are not coming as speakers on Christian theology or mission, but our mission as Christians includes both personal evangelism and also public justice,” Moore wrote on his blog. “We are Americans, yes, but we are not Americans first. We are citizens too of the Holy City, the New Jerusalem, and we wait not for a president but for a King.”

It is a more indirect approach to evangelical engagement from both Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal’s Response Rally in January, which more overtly blended his political and spiritual goals, and from the Values Voter Conference hosted by the Family Research Council in September. Instead it echoes, on a smaller scale, evangelical megachurch pastor Rick Warren’s 2008 debate between Sen. John McCain and then-Sen. Barack Obama, hosted at his Saddleback Church.

Bush, a Catholic, has been wooing Christian conservatives behind the scenes for months. He sat down with Moore more than 15 months ago in Miami to talk about evangelical concerns. In April he spoke to Hispanic evangelicals about immigration at the invitation of pastor Samuel Rodriguez Jr., the head of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, whose board Moore recently joined. Rodriguez also called Rubio’s candidacy “a testimony of God-fearing, hard-working, family-loving, freedom-advancing Americans of Hispanic descent” when he announced his White House run, but later questioned his conviction on immigration.

Despite the candidates’ focus on reaching evangelical leaders, one group of evangelicals may less accessible, if only because there are fewer of them present for the conversation they want to have—women. Just 30% of the Send conference participants are women, and only two of the event’s 37 featured speakers are women. The day after Send, Moore is hosting a one-day conference on evangelical political engagement, and there again are only two women in the lineup of 17 keynote spots, Jennifer Marshall, a vice president at the Heritage Foundation, and Karen Sallow Prior, an English professor at the evangelical Liberty University.

Demographically, the divide makes sense, as only men can hold top pastoral positions in the Southern Baptist Convention tradition, but it could make the conversation over hot-button issues such as abortion more charged.

TIME 2016 Election

Donald Trump Just Gave Out His Own Cell Phone Number

You can't out-troll the Donald

After Gawker released Donald Trump’s cell phone number on Monday, the Republican presidential contender has countered by making his number public .

Dialing the phone at press time resulted in a busy signal, but others have recorded the number’s message which encourages listeners to follow Trump on twitter and visit his campaign website.

The candidate’s tweet is the latest in a saga of phone number disclosures involving Trump. In July, Trump released fellow Republican presidential candidate Lindsey Graham’s phone number. “I don’t know, give it a shot,” Trump told supporters during a campaign speech that was released on video.

Graham later produced a video that showed the senator destroying his cell phone in multiple different ways.

TIME White House

Bill Clinton Has a Little Fun in Birthday Tweet to Obama

"Hopefully when @FLOTUS isn't looking you can have some cake"

The 42nd President wished the 44th President a Happy Birthday on Twitter—with a wink toward the First Lady.

“Happy birthday, ! Hopefully when isn’t looking you can have some cake. ,” Bill Clinton wrote Tuesday on Twitter.

Obama turned 54 on Tuesday. Neither Obama nor First Lady Michelle Obama (@FLOTUS) had responded to Clinton’s birthday tweet as of early Tuesday afternoon.

TIME 2016 Election

Chris Christie Has Used Birth Control—’And Not Just the Rhythm Method’

Chris Christie, Governor of New Jersey and candidate in the Republicans' presidential candidates race, talks with a voter at The Puritan Backroom in Manchester, N.H. on Aug. 3, 2015.
CJ Gunther—EPA Chris Christie, Governor of New Jersey and candidate in the Republicans' presidential candidates race, talks with a voter at The Puritan Backroom in Manchester, N.H. on Aug. 3, 2015.

The governor doesn't think using birth control makes him "an awful Catholic"

Gov. Chris Christie announced he has used birth control at a town hall meeting Tuesday morning, and he made sure to leave little room for ambiguity.

“I’m a Catholic, but I’ve used birth control—and not just the rhythm method, ok?” the Republican presidential candidate admitted to a crowd at a Manchester, N.H. restaurant.

Christie made it clear that he has struggled with his faith’s doctrine on sex and family, which holds that contraceptives “work against the natural gift of fertility.”

“My church has a teaching against birth control,” said the governor. “Does that make me an awful Catholic, because I believe and practiced that function during part of my life? I don’t think so.”

Watch the full video below.

TIME Debates

Republican Bosses Show Muscle at Bloodless Presidential Forum in New Hampshire

Eleven of the declared 2016 Republican U.S. presidential candidates pose together on stage before the start of the the Voters First Presidential Forum in Manchester
Brian Snyder—Reuters Eleven of the declared 2016 Republican U.S. presidential candidates pose together on stage before the start of the the Voters First Presidential Forum in Manchester, New Hampshire, August 3, 2015.

No news is good news at this point for the GOP

Republican Party Chairman Reince Priebus set about reforming the debating process for the GOP nomination more than two years ago. His goal: to prevent a repeat of 2012’s 23 debates—which promoted party infighting and left its ultimate standard-bearer battered. “Our debates will be good for our candidates and for voters—not a field day for the media,” Priebus told members of the Republican National Committee last year in Chicago.

Monday’s “Voters First” forum in New Hampshire is the clearest indication that Priebus has largely succeeded in that goal thus-far—at least as far as candidates are concerned.

The bloodless two-hour event featured two-rounds of questioning of the candidates, almost entirely geared to each candidates’ strengths and stump-speeches. Lindsey Graham got foreign policy questions, just as Rick Perry was asked about immigration and John Kasich got questions no the budget. There was little interaction between candidates, other than the occasional shout-out that someone was their “friend.” Voters tuning in—and there were few, as it was only broadcast on C-SPAN and local television in a few early voting states—would have heard little new. Searching for scraps, the most news to be found were a pair of candidates (Kasich and Rubio) avoiding using the terms “path to citizenship” in their answers on immigration reform, an uneven and awkward answer by former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush about his brother and father, and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie jostling with the moderator about being “washed-up” as a candidate.

Squeezing 14 candidates in such a small time frame left the forum feeling like watching televised speed dating, in which candidates practiced their well-honed pick-up lines. While each had their turn in the hot-seat, the rest of the assembled field watched from the front row of the theater chairs at St. Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. Making the setting more awkward, Rubio, Sen. Rand Paul, and Sen. Ted Cruz all participated remotely from Washington due to votes on the Senate floor.

The most contentious questions came to Paul over his foreign policy and domestic surveillance positions—not as softball as the rest, but beliefs he is well practiced in defending.

Indeed, the forum was virtually indistinguishable from every other candidate cattle-call over the last 18 months, other than the fact it took speeches were usually given over two or three days and condensed them into two hours. But the bland spectacle was nonetheless a win for the Republican Party, which hopes to focus the nation’s attention on the first official Republican debate in Cleaveland on Thursday, which will be hosted by Fox News anchors Megyn Kelly, Bret Baier, and Chris Wallace

Thursday night will be different, not least because Donald Trump will be on stage, and the candidates will be able to interact with each other, cutting off or criticizing their rivals as they go. The New York real estate mogul skipped the event Monday in protest of critical editorials in the New Hampshire Union Leader, the principal organizer.

Trump, the leader in the national polls determining who qualifies, will be center-stage, flanked by Bush and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and seven other candidates whose oxygen Trump’s rise has largely stolen. Many are out for blood, hoping that in attacking Trump they can boost their own political fortunes. Before the debate, the six candidates who did not break the top-10 in the polls will participate in an undercard debate, which is likely to be as heated, as those candidates vie for a piece of the spotlight from backstage.

It remains to be seen whether Priebus’ plan to keep the debates from damaging the eventual nominee pans out, but so far he has at least managed to tame the never-ending series of forums and at least contained the televised contests to a more manageable number.

TIME Morning Must Reads

Morning Must Reads: Aug. 4

Capitol
Mark Wilson—Getty Images The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC.

More than two years ago, Republican Party Chairman Reince Priebus set about reforming the debating process for the GOP nomination to prevent a repeat of 2012’s 23 debates—which promoted party infighting and left its ultimate standard-bearer battered. Last night’s “Voters First” forum in New Hampshire is the clearest indication that Priebus has largely succeeded in that goal thus-far. The bloodless two-hour event featured two-rounds of questioning of the candidates, almost entirely geared to each candidates’ strengths and stump speeches. (Lindsey Graham got foreign policy questions, Rick Perry: immigration, John Kasich: budget, and so on…) Squeezing 14 candidates in such a small time-frame left the forum feeling like watching televised speed-dating, in which candidates practiced their well-honed pick-up lines. The most contentious questions came to Sen. Rand Paul over his foreign policy and domestic surveillance positions—not as softball as the rest, but beliefs he is well-practiced in defending. All in all, the forum was virtually indistinguishable from every other candidate cattle-call over the last 18 months, other than the fact it took speeches were usually given over two or three days and condensed them into two hours.

Thursday night will be different, not least because Donald Trump will be on stage. Fox New will make the final determinations for entry at 5 p.m. today, but the latest polling indicates that the roster of candidates filling the top 10 spots in national polling (and thus eligible for the debate) looks like this: Donald Trump, Jeb Bush, Scott Walker, Mike Huckabee, Ben Carson, Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, Rand Paul, Chris Christie, and John Kasich. The rest of the field will participate in an undercard forum a few hours before the 9 p.m. Tuesday main event.

Elsewhere in politics, President Obama will meet with American Jewish leaders Tuesday to defend his Iran nuclear deal. And Hillary Clinton will be in Denver participating in what her campaign calls a grassroots event.

Here are your must-reads:

Republicans Brace for Biggest Week Yet in Presidential Race
TIME’s Sam Frizell previews a pivotal week in the contest

Unhappy Voters Shake Up Presidential Race
Anti-establishment candidates find an eager following [Wall Street Journal]

Republican Effort to Strip Planned Parenthood Funding Stalls in Senate
Democrats block procedural motion in mostly partisan vote [Washington Post]

Move to Fight Obama’s Climate Plan Started Early
GOP has been plotting response for months [New York Times]

Sound Off

“I’ve heard this question before…” — Texas Gov. Rick Perry cutting off the moderator at the Voters First Forum when asked which government agencies he’d like to cut — a redo of his famous 2012 brain-freeze. Perry said he’d get rid of Obamacare, but this time didn’t list a single agency. Oops?

“Economic growth is not an end to itself…I think with economic growth comes a responsibility to help people who are living in the shadows. Our whole purpose is to give people a sense that the American Dream is still alive, and that we all can rise.” — Ohio Gov. John Kasich asked why he’s running took a thinly-veiled shot at former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush at the forum

Bits and Bites

Carly Fiorina Prepares to Miss the Cut for First Republican Debate [TIME]

NBA Investor Backed Scott Walker Super PAC Before Stadium Push [TIME]

How Data and Programmatic TV Will Dominate the 2016 Presidential Campaign [AdWeek]

Trump Counters Rivals With Reminders of Past Generosity: His [New York Times]

Scott Walker Given Fake $900m Check from Koch Brothers for ‘Climate Denial’ [The Guardian]

Cash-Strapped Rick Santorum Campaign Reshuffles Staff [Politico]

Parody Harvard Crimson Editorial Endorses Donald Trump [Boston Globe]

Here Are the Polls Fox News Will Use to Select the Candidates for the First GOP Debate [New York Magazine]

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