TIME Television

The Olsen Twins Aren’t Returning for the Full House Revival

The actresses will not reprise the role they shared as Michelle Tanner on the upcoming Netflix series Fuller House

Fuller House is moving forward without one very important member of the Tanner family.

Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen will not reprise the role they shared as Michelle in the upcoming Netflix revival of the beloved ABC sitcom, The Hollywood Reporter has learned.

“Although Ashley and Mary-Kate will not be a part of Fuller House, I know how much Full House has meant to them and they are still very much considered family,” executive producer Robert L. Boyett said in a statement. “It has been exciting to see how they have built their professional careers, and I support their choice to focus on their fashion brands and various business endeavors. I appreciate their support and good wishes towards Fuller House.

The new incarnation will star original cast members Candace Cameron-Bure (D.J.), her on-screen younger sister, Jodie Sweetin (Stephanie), and Andrea Barber, who played her best friend, Kimmy Gibbler. John Stamos will produce and reprise his role as Uncle Jesse in a guest role.Dave Coulier will also return as Uncle Joey. Talks are under way to bring back fellow original stars Bob Sagetand Lori Loughlin.

Although much of the original cast is set to return, the Olsen twins’ participation had long been in question. Days after the revival was officially announced on Jimmy Kimmel Live! in late April, they said they had not been made aware of the plan to bring the show back. However, Stamos subsequently called their claim “bullshit” in a tweet that has since been deleted.

The actresses got their start on Full House when they were just nine months old. They quickly turned their notoriety on the show into an empire of direct-to-video movies and specials under their company, Dualstar Entertainment, which was formed in 1993. After Full House ended in 1995, they starred on two other TV short-lived series, Two of a Kind and So Little Time. In recent years, the Olsens have turned their attention to their two fashion lines, The Row and Elizabeth and James.

Ashley has not acted since an uncredited appearance in 2010’s I’m Still Here, and Mary-Kate has not acted since 2011’s Beastly.

Premiering on Netflix in 2016, the series finds D.J. Tanner-Fuller employed as a vet, pregnant and recently widowed, and living in San Francisco. Stephanie, now an aspiring musician, and single mother Kimmy — along with Kimmy’s feisty teenage daughter, Ramona — all move in to help take care of D.J.’s two boys — the rebellious 12-year-old J.D. and neurotic 7-year-old Max — and her soon-to-arrive baby.

The multicamera comedy hails from Warner Horizon Television, Miller-Boyett Productions and Jeff Franklin Productions. Full House creator Jeff Franklin will return to oversee Fuller House alongside exec producers Boyett and Thomas L. Miller. The series originally aired on ABC from 1987 to 1995.

This article originally appeared on The Hollywood Reporter

More from The Hollywood Reporter:

TIME feminism

Jessica Lange Says Hollywood Is Run From a ‘Male Point of View’

The Paley Center For Media's 32nd Annual PALEYFEST LA - "American Horror Story: Freak Show"
Jason LaVeris—FilmMagic/Getty Images Jessica Lange attends the "American Horror Story: Freak Show" event at the 32nd annual PaleyFest at Dolby Theatre in Hollywood on March 15, 2015

"Even if a woman runs a studio, she still does it with a male point of view."

Actress Jessica Lange expressed little surprise that a movie studio reportedly turned down 37-year-old actress Maggie Gyllenhaal as “too old,” declaring that the entire movie making industry was run from a “male point of view.”

“Even if a woman runs a studio, she still does it with a male point of view,” Lange, the lead actor on the FX series American Horror Story, said in an interview with TheWrap.

“That men continue to be fascinating and attractive and virile, and women age and are no longer sexual or beautiful ,” she said. “It’s a fantasy that has nothing to do with reality.”

TIME Television

‘Mad Men’ Finale Attracts Record Audience

Don Draper finishes on a high note

It turns out a record number of people wanted to say goodbye to Don Draper—it just took them a few days to get to him. After three days of time-shifted viewing, the series finale of Mad Men on Sunday ended up attracting 4.6 million viewers—an unprecedented amount for the seven-year-old AMC series.

The finale also posted a record high among adults 25-54 (2.5 million).

“While it’s true that AMC’s Mad Men ended with its highest-ever live+3 ratings, we believe the most meaningful metric for this iconic series will turn out to be live+forever,” said AMC President Charlie Collier in a statement. “We hope Matthew Weiner and the many extraordinarily talented people who helped elevate his vision over the last decade are smiling and finding peace like Don Draper at Esalen. This incredible team has produced 92 individual works of art, and we feel so fortunate to forever be known as the birthplace and home of Mad Men. To quote Roger Sterling from the show’s very first episode, ‘I don’t think I have to tell you what you just witnessed here.’”

The finale was also big on Twitter: Draper et al generated nearly 50 million impressions to become the No. 1 series across all of broadcast and cable that night.

This article originally appeared on EW.com

TIME

Nicki Minaj Drops ‘The Night Is Still Young’ Video on Tidal

Nicki Minaj performs onstage during the 2015 Billboard Music Awards on May 17, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Michael Tran—WireImage Nicki Minaj performs onstage during the 2015 Billboard Music Awards on May 17, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

It's the second exclusive music video she's dropped on Tidal

Nicki Minaj and Tidal might be better BFFs than Nicki and Beyoncé. The Pinkprint rapper dropped another exclusive music video on the streaming service this week, with “The Night Is Still Young” being the lucky pick.

Minaj’s crew dances around her before she descends upon downtown Los Angeles, with an enormous moon and youthful (as the song indicates), irresponsible partygoers. Like, who run through typically busy and trafficky tunnels and streets with reckless abandon? I guess if one can afford riding in a Ferrari-type cab, rules are merely abstract. Watch the video on Tidal here, or on YouTube before it’s yanked.

This article originally appeared on EW.com.

TIME Television

Here’s What Happened to Other TV Shows Embroiled in Controversy Like 19 and Counting

As the fate of 19 and Counting is debated, a look at the outcomes of similar cases

On Thursday, Josh Duggar, the eldest of the 19 siblings on the TLC reality show 19 and Counting, resigned from his post at the Family Research Council amidst allegations of child molestation. In a statement to PEOPLE, Duggar confirmed that the allegations are true, saying that he is deeply regretful for his actions as a teenager.

In the wake of Duggar’s statement, focus has shifted to TLC, which has yet to make a statement about whether 19 and Counting will continue to air. On Thursday night, as the controversy picked up steam, TLC aired a marathon of the show, causing a minor uproar on social media. On Friday afternoon, the network removed the show from its schedule but still hadn’t confirmed what the future holds in store for the series. As the show’s fate hangs in the balance, many are calling for TLC to permanently cancel it—lodging comparisons to another TLC series, Here Comes Honey Boo Boo, which was pulled in 2014 under similar circumstances.

For insight into what might happen to 19 and Counting—notwithstanding the question of what should happen—here’s a look at the fates of several other TV shows that came under fire when a star became embroiled in allegations of sexual abuse and assault.

Here Comes Honey Boo Boo: The Toddlers & Tiaras spin-off, which centered on the sassy child beauty pageant star Alana “Honey Boo Boo” Thompson, ran for four seasons before TLC canceled it, in 2014, in response to allegations that Alana’s mother June was dating a man convicted of child molestation.

As details surfaced, the allegations were confirmed; Alana’s older sister Anna had been the victim. The man, Mark McDaniel, had already served 10 years in prison after pleading guilty to aggravated child molestation. TLC had filmed a fifth season of the series, which remains unaired.

7th Heaven: In 2014, seven years after the final episode of the WB family drama—which aired from 1996 until 2007—the New York Police Department began investigating actor Stephen Collins, the show’s fictional patriarch. The police had obtained a recording of a man, alleged to be Collins, confessing to having sexually abused a minor. Two months later, Collins disclosed to PEOPLE that he had, in fact, had “inappropriate sexual conduct with three female minors.”

The television network UP, which had been airing reruns of 7th Heaven since 2012, pulled the series immediately after the allegations surfaced. UP quietly began showing the series again in 2014 in response to requests from viewers, but quickly pulled it. In a statement, the network explained its on-again, off-again relationship with the show: “We brought the show back because many viewers expressed they could separate allegations against one actor from the fictional series itself, as it turns out they cannot.” Collins was never prosecuted due to the expired statute of limitations on all of the incidents.

Bill Cosby 77: Bill Cosby had a long list of credits to his name—from the long-running Cosby Show to Cosby to hosting Kids Say the Darnedest Things—before the allegations of rape and sexual assault began accumulating. More than 40 women have levied accusations against the comedian since 2000, with incidents reportedly dating back to 1965.

In 2014, media attention increased significantly, due in part to the comedian Hannibal Buress remarking on the allegations in a stand-up routine. Following a number of new accusations, a stand-up comedy special called Bill Cosby 77 slated to air on Netflix was postponed indefinitely just ten days ahead of its release. Netflix made the announcement on the same day that model Janice Dickinson accused Cosby of rape.

CeeLo Green’s The Good Life: In 2012, singer, producer and then-coach of The Voice CeeLo Green was accused of sexual assault, leading to a lengthy police investigation. The following year, he pleaded not guilty to a felony charge of providing a controlled substance to the woman involved in the sexual assault controversy, though no charges were brought for the assault itself. Despite his checkered past, TBS green-lit a reality show starring Green, CeeLo Green’s The Good Life, which premiered in June 2014. But when Green took to Twitter to express a slew of controversial opinions about rape and consent, TBS canceled the show.

Read Next: What the Josh Duggar Fiasco Can Teach Us About Pedophilia

 

TIME Television

TLC Pulls 19 Kids and Counting After Josh Duggar Molestation Claims

"We are deeply saddened and troubled by this heartbreaking situation," TLC said

TLC has pulled 19 Kids and Counting from its schedule in the wake of accusations that star Josh Duggar molested several underage girls as a teenager.

“Effective immediately, TLC has pulled all episodes of 19 Kids and Counting currently from the air. We are deeply saddened and troubled by this heartbreaking situation, and our thoughts and prayers are with the family and victims at this difficult time,” the network said in a statement late Friday.

TLC had refused to comment on the incident Thursday, but the network sparked outrage later that evening when it ran a 19 Kids and Counting marathon. As of early Friday, the show had been scheduled to air on the morning of May 27, but it has since been taken off the schedule.

News of Duggar’s past indiscretions leaked Thursday and the 27-year-old, who is now married with three children, immediately issued a statement apologizing for his indiscretions. “Twelve years ago, as a young teenager I acted inexcusably for which I am extremely sorry and deeply regret. I hurt others, including my family and close friends. I confessed this to my parents who took several steps to help me address the situation.”

“We spoke with the authorities where I confessed my wrongdoing,” Duggar continued, “and my parents arranged for me and those affected by my actions to receive counseling. I understood that if I continued down this wrong road that I would end up ruining my life. I sought forgiveness from those I had wronged and asked Christ to forgive me and come into my life. I would do anything to go back to those teen years and take different actions. In my life today, I am so very thankful for God’s grace, mercy and redemption.”

According to a 2006 police report published by In Touch, his parents reported the incidents to the police but charges were never filed.

In addition to his statement, the eldest son of Jim Bob and Michelle Duggar resigned his position as a lobbyist with the Family Research Council (FRC), an organization dedicated to preserving family values in America.

Jim Bob and Michelle also issued a statement about the ordeal, which they called “one of the most difficult times” of their lives. “That dark and difficult time caused us to seek God like never before. Even though we would never choose to go through something so terrible, each one of our family members drew closer to God. We pray that as people watch our lives they see that we are not a perfect family.”

The move is no surprise considering that TLC canceled Here Comes Honey Boo Boo shortly after allegations surfaced about a romantic relationship between series matriarch June “Mama June” Shannon and a man convicted of child molestation.

Like Here Comes Honey Boo Boo, 19 Kids and Counting is one of the cable channel’s biggest brands. The show has been on the air since 2008 and is in its 15th season. The profile of the Duggar family had been on the rise in recent years thanks to national magazine covers focused on the marriages and pregnancies of the Duggar children.

However, controversy has followed the Duggar clan as well. In November 2014, more than 100,000 people signed a Change.org petition calling for TLC to cancel the show after Michelle was featured in a robocall telling Fayetteville, Ark. residents to opposite an anti-discrimination ordinance that many critics deemed as anti-gay.

This article originally appeared on The Hollywood Reporter.

More from The Hollywood Reporter:

TIME movies

Take a First Look at Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp

New photos from the Netflix prequel series

In the new photos for Netflix’s Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp, all your favorite Camp Firewood counselors look fresh-faced, eager to take on the summer, and, well, older. Time is an abstract concept in the Netflix series, a prequel to Michael Showalter and David Wain’s 2001 movie, which took place on the last day of camp.

The movie’s original stars are back for the eight episodes. So you’ll see Amy Poehler and Bradley Cooper’s musical theater enthusiasts Susie and Ben sharing a keyboard, Christopher Meloni’s nutty Gene doing the splits with a precariously placed knife, Paul Rudd’s jerk Andy massaging Marguerite Moreau’s Katie, and more familiar—if more mature—faces.

The series debuts on July 31.

TIME movies

Amy Schumer Plans Mother-Daughter Comedy

Amy Schumer and her sister are collaborating with Paul Feig.

Amy Schumer’s Trainwreck still has yet to come out, but she’s lining up another enticing comedy for the big screen.

Fox confirms to TIME that the comedian will star in a mother-daughter comedy set to be produced by Paul Feig, who directed Bridesmaids, The Heat, and this summer’s Spy.

Schumer and her sister, Kim Caramele, are bringing Schumer’s voice to a script originally by Katie Dippold, who wrote The Heat and is working with Feig on the new Ghostbusters, and will be an executive producer on this film. Caramele is a writer and producer on Schumer’s show Inside Amy Schumer.

The film “centers on a mother-daughter duo trapped in a vacation gone wrong,” according to The Hollywood Reporter, which first reported the news.

 

TIME 2016 Election

Mike Huckabee Stands By Josh Duggar

"Good people make mistakes and do regrettable and even disgusting things"

Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee supported Josh Duggar on Friday in the wake of reports that the reality TV star had molested five children when he was a teenager.

The former Arkansas governor wrote on Facebook that members of the Duggar family have his support, and that “today’s blood-thirsty media does not understand… that being a minor means that one’s judgement is not mature.” He stressed Duggar’s young age at the time of the incidents and that “the victims wanted this to be left in the past.”

“No one needs to defend Josh’s actions as a teenager,” Huckabee wrote, “but the fact that he confessed his sins to those he harmed, sought help, and has gone forward to live a responsible and circumspect life as an adult is testament to his family’s authenticity and humility.”

Duggar said in a statement after the news broke that he “acted inexcusably.”

MORE Who Are the Duggars?

TIME Television

TLC Should Cancel 19 Kids and Counting

The reality show has been selling a sanctimonious sham

It’s time for TLC to get out of the Duggar business.

On Thursday Josh Duggar, eldest son of the giant clan in TLC’s 19 Kids and Counting, admitted “act[ing] inexcusably” following the revelation of charges that he molested underage girls, including some of his sisters, when he was a teenager. His confession came after an expose reported by InTouch, which unearthed police records that not only documented the molestation but showed that patriarch Jim Bob Duggar waited more than a year before contacting police. Josh Duggar also resigned as executive director of the Family Research Council, a socially conservative advocacy group.

And TLC? It hasn’t announced any decision on the show’s future. (As I write, it’s replaced a daytime rerun of the show with The Little Couple.) Josh may be paying some price. But TLC also needs to stop collecting a price from a lucrative franchise that has turned out to be a sanctimonious sham.

This is not about TV networks having an obligation to exact punishments that the justice system didn’t. TLC, Discovery and every other media corporation are not legal authorities, and I don’t especially want media executives responsible for meting out justice.

They are, however, responsible for the programming they put on. And what TLC has been putting on the air since 2008 with the Duggar family is, simply, a moral fraud.

That may not be TLC’s fault—the incidents predate the show’s premiere—but it is TLC’s problem. 19 Kids is not just about the wacky logistics of running a really, really big family. It’s social advocacy, about the Duggars setting themselves up as a moral and religious example, espousing conservative Christian values and withdrawal from the wickedness of larger society—homeschooling, limiting media intake—as a means of raising Godly children. They set themselves up as a model, and implicitly or explicitly criticized other ways of life—even before you get to the family’s extracurricular political endorsements, judgment of gay couples, and involvement with organizations whose missions are to tell the rest of us how to live.

Nobody’s perfect. But child molesting is a much bigger imperfection than most, one that the show’s audience deserved to know about. That the family kept the whole truth from us and set themselves up as paragons of childrearing and decency is morally dishonest. It’s not just an insult to people who don’t share their religious and cultural beliefs. It’s an offense to all the people who fervently do.

Maybe those believers are willing to put this behind them. Maybe they feel, genuinely, that the family has suffered and want to support it. And it will be tempting for TLC to leave it at that and leave a valuable franchise on the air. (That wasn’t enough to save Here Comes Honey Boo Boo, the onetime phenomenon TLC canceled after reports that matriarch Mama June was dating a convicted child molester.)

It has no excuse to. Maybe Josh Duggar is truly remorseful, maybe not. That’s for people to decide themselves. And it may be that the show’s fans—or even non-fans—may decide to forgive his actions and his family’s inactions. That’s a personal decision. As a moral principle, judge-not-lest-ye-be-judged is admirable. But as a business principle, it means being able to do anything, to do business with anyone, and profit from it anyway.

Maybe TLC couldn’t help that the Duggars’ hypocrisy got on the air. But it can make sure that it doesn’t go on making money from it.

Read next: Arkansas Police Destroy Record of Josh Duggar Investigation

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com