TIME Autos

Owners of Nearly 8 Million Cars Warned to Replace Airbags Immediately

Takata Airbags Lead Toyota, Nissan To Recall 3 Million Cars
The airbag unit for the passenger seat of a Toyota Motor Corp. vehicle is seen at the company's showroom in Tokyo, Japan, on Thursday, April 11, 2013. Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

Federal regulators said Tuesday that 7.8 million are affected by faulty air bags from supplier Takata

The National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration on Tuesday warned owners of nearly 8 million cars with potentially faulty airbags to “act immediately” on notices to replace the defective parts, in an alert sent over fears that car owners weren’t getting defective airbags replaced, leaving them at risk of injury or death.

 

The NHTSA has recommended that owners of 7.8 million Toyota, Honda, Mazda, BMW, Nissan, Mitsubishi, Subaru, Chrysler, Ford and General Motors models replace air bags supplied by Takata. The airbags, which can explode in a flurry of shrapnel even after a minor accident, have caused at least three deaths and more than 100 injuries.

“Responding to these recalls, whether old or new, is essential to personal safety and it will help aid our ongoing investigation into Takata airbags and what appears to be a problem related to extended exposure to consistently high humidity and temperatures,” NHTSA Deputy Administrator David Friedman said in a statement.

A total of more than 14 million vehicles from 11 automakers have been recalled over Takata airbags, most in the last two years, the New York Times reports.

TIME

Here Are The Strange Things Dudes Are Asking on Lulu’s New Messaging Service

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The once women-only app is doing some serious male outreach

Lulu — an app that allows women to rate men as if they were consumer goods, including hashtags ranging from the good (#SelfMadeMan) to the gross (#PornEducated) — has now opened up the lines of communication between female and male users. After three weeks of beta testing, the two-year-old app launched its Truth Bombs feature Wednesday, which allows men to anonymously ask women questions. This feedback just might be what they need to raise their Yelp-like score.

“This is the first time we are doing any messaging,” said Lulu co-founder Alison Schwartz. “How it works is guys can ask an anonymous question or test out a theory they want to test out with women, some sort of query, and then they get instant feedback from millions of girls.”

The new feature pointedly marks the evolving relationship Lulu has with its million-plus male users. When the app launched in Feb. 2013, it was advertised as a secret, ladies-only space to swap information about former male relations. Bros stole glances at female friends’ phones and attempted hacks to see how they were doing. After a slew of Internet backlash (and anti-Lulu petitions) deriding the app for inciting bullying and gender-based double standards, Lulu made the experience more male-friendly in 2014 by having a policy where men had to opt-in and give their full permission to be reviewed. In May, the male-outreach went a step further and Lulu allowed men to check their scores, giving them tips and affirmations. (“Girls love your kissing.”)

And now, men can go straight to the source and ask women questions. But what have the men been asking? During the beta test, these were the most popular questions verbatim (there are some pretty bad typos), some of which led to 2,500 responses, although most questions average 15 replies:

  1. How many guys have you slept with and how old are you… GO !
  2. What age did you loose your virginity?
  3. Do women like abs or arms more?
  4. How frequently do girls masterbate?
  5. Do girls find it attractive if a guy claims p***y is being thrown at him left and right?

Um, woah. Some of these misspelled questions about “loosing” virginity (“Freudian slip?” asked Scwhartz) are just the type of sophomoric musings you’d expect from a dude who gets to anonymously crowdsource information from anonymous women. But when asked how the women were responding to the questions, Schwartz said, “They are meaningfully answering what the guys are asking about. They are trying to be really helpful.”

And there are moderation protocols — “we have designed a product against bullying,” said Scwhartz — to keep things clean, relatively. Although of the 60,000 Truth Bombs that were asked during the three week beta test, averaging some 100 Truth Bombs an hour, only 800 were flagged.

For now, the messaging option is all anonymous and each thread is limited to one guy (the one who posed the question) and millions of female users. Although other men can view the threads, they can’t participate in the conversation.

“But we see on the app that there’s interested in moving to a one girl one guy dynamic,” said Schwartz. Could the next step in Lulu be one-on-one communication, perhaps enabling dating? “Anything is possible, but we would do that in a way that this is very true to Lulu.”

See Also:

This Map Shows What Guys Are Like in Each Major City

Rate The Date Online: Lulu App Lets Women Review Hookups

TIME Careers & Workplace

8 Questions You Have to Ask During a Job Interview

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Don't be afraid to grill hiring managers. Chances are, they're hoping you will

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This post is in partnership with Inc., which offers useful advice, resources and insights to entrepreneurs and business owners. The article below was originally published at Inc.com.

Earlier this month, I was interviewing a prospective designer for my company. The candidate asked, “Who does wireframing for your app, the product team or the design team?” A simple question. But it kicked off a great discussion about our processes and how he could contribute to the team.

I remember thinking, “Hey, we are already working together…” This candidate is now an employee and a good fit for our company. His simple question opened the doors for us to have a genuine conversation about each other’s motivations, needs, passions, and work philosophies. In my 20-plus years in the recruitment industry, I am still surprised by how rare this crucial conversation is in a job interview.

There’s no doubt candidates who ask questions have a better chance at landing their dream job. Here are eight of the best questions I’ve heard from candidates:

1. What role will I fill?

When it comes to an employee’s role in a business’s strategy, the job title explains only so much. You are filling a void on the living, breathing team. Is this company hoping for an ideas person, a mentor to other employees, a creative force, a rule follower, a rule breaker? Get to the specifics of “who” your position is supposed to be.

2. Why does this role matter to the growth of the company?

Use this question to explore the expected level of engagement. Are you more comfortable being in a low- or a high-impact role? Do you want to be in a role that is universally respected within the company or are you OK being the undercover hero?

3. Who would my colleagues be?

The best interviews include three to four team members. If that is not the case in your interview, use this question to gain insight into team dynamics and personalities. These are the people you will spend every day with, so they need to pass what Tom Gimbel calls “the airplane test“—someone you would enjoy sitting next to on a long flight.

4. What would I be doing that makes your job easier?

This question has two benefits—you will find out who is going to lean on you the heaviest and what you will need to do to keep the other teammates happy. The answers to this question will be the immediate problems each team member is hoping you will solve.

5. What are additional important skills I will need to do this job well?

What are the soft skills needed for this particular job? Find out if the company needs someone who is also a self-starter or works well in teams. This is also an excellent time to bring up any additional skills you have that are appropriate for position.

6. How does the company measure success?

Identifying how your progress in this position will be measured will give you a better idea of whether or not you will be successful. Get specifics on what your deliverables will be per project. Ask about common work habits of people who have had this position in the past whom the company considered successful.

7. What would you expect from me this month, in three months, and in a year?

Chances are that your employer has a trajectory for your role in mind. Find out what you will need to deliver in the next coming months. Ask yourself if this pace feels doable for the way you work.

8. What is your mission?

This is one of the most important questions you can ask. Research shows that employees are most happy when their goals align with those of their employers. Get philosophical here and find out why you are both here in this room and if you want the same things.

Repeat your questions for each hiring manager you meet, because you will get different responses from different people. As a CEO, I am often the last person in the round of interviews. It happens time and time again that I will say, “Do you have any questions for me?” and get a polite “No, I got a lot of my questions answered.”

I didn’t get my questions answered though. Keep the conversation going. If you want to work for my company, you have to ask for it.

TIME Careers & Workplace

Hate Mornings? 6 Small Changes That Will Fix Everything

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Here are quick remedies to the biggest obstacle to having a prefect day

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This post is in partnership with Inc., which offers useful advice, resources and insights to entrepreneurs and business owners. The article below was originally published at Inc.com.

The first few minutes of your morning are the most important of your day and can set the tone for positivity and productivity. Ideally, you have an app or clock that taps into your natural circadian rhythm and wakes you during your “best time” within a certain window. Getting jarred out of a deep REM slumber to the sound of a blaring alarm clock sets you up for a negative day brimming with fatigue and crankiness.

But getting the right alarm clock is only part of the battle.

Here are six ways to start your morning better while kicking bad habits that destroy good sleep hygiene.

1. Give yourself at least 15 minutes of no screen time

Besides turning off an alarm that might be on your phone, resist the urge to check your email or social media. It sets you up for a day of being enslaved to technology, and your morning time should be reserved just for you. This might mean disabling notifications on your home screen so you’re not tempted by that Facebook update or mounting emails.

2. Swap out the coffee for lemon water

Lukewarm water with a fresh lemon squeezed into it has numerous benefits–but you need to drink it first thing in the morning. It starts your metabolism, which burns fat while sustaining muscle, cleanses your mouth and throat, and gives you a boost of energy. Then wait at least 30 minutes before brushing your teeth, drinking, or eating. This might be a toughie for caffeine addicts, but you can manage 30 minutes and it’s a great way to reduce the need for a coffee fix.

3. Sit up correctly

There are many “bad ways” to get out of bed, but only one best way, if your body allows for it: Roll over onto your right side, then push yourself up into a sitting position before standing with a straight back (no hunching). It’s the gentlest way to get up, takes the pressure off your heart and back, and is a great, easy ritual to start your morning right.

4. Set and affirm your goals for the day

While stretching in bed or prepping your lemon water, set some feasible goals for the day, but limit them to three. This might include packing your lunch instead of eating out to save money, committing to that noon yoga class, or scheduling the doctor’s appointment you’ve been putting off.

5. Stretch

It seems so obvious, and yet so many people ignore it. You can do this in bed, using a simple stretched-out-legs-and-arms-overhead movement. You can indulge in a supine twist on a padded floor, or you can practice whatever feels right for as little or as long as you like. Your body’s just been booted down for hours–you can’t expect it to be warmed up, energized, and raring to go right away.

6. Meditate

Don’t skip over this one just because it sounds boring or like you don’t have time for it. Meditation is only as strict, long, short, boring, or annoying as you make it. A “successful” meditation in an entire lifetime might be only a few seconds. However, sitting in a comfortable position and focusing on clearing your mind–even if it’s for less than a minute–can help your mental clarity and spiritual well-being and set the stage for the day.

You probably already know which morning habits aren’t serving you, so why keep doing them? Instead, focus on what really makes your mornings better and prioritize them.

TIME Spending & Saving

5 Weird Reasons Your Credit Card May Be Declined

American Express, Discover, MasterCard and Visa credit cards are displayed for a photograph in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, May 18, 2010. Credit-card firms caught off-guard by U.S. Senate passage of curbs on debit fees are facing what one executive sees as a "volcanic" eruption of legislation, including possible limits on interest rates. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Bloomberg/Getty Images

You might never see these major headaches coming your way

When President Obama mentioned that he’d recently had his credit card declined at a New York City restaurant, the news was kind of funny. The leader of the free world getting his card rejected? But all joking aside, it can happen to anybody, for any number of reasons. “I guess I don’t use it enough, so they thought there was some fraud going on,” the President said.

That’s actually a pretty common reason issuers will freeze a card, experts say. Here are some other unexpected reasons your card could be declined. Here are some others they say you should watch out for, so you’re not stuck standing at a payment terminal trying to explain, like Obama, that no, you really do pay your bills on time.

You hit the road. “[If] you make purchases the same day in distant locations — you buy breakfast in Toledo and then you’re shopping in New York that evening — your card issuer may not know you’re traveling and could decline the purchase,” says Gerri Detweiler, director of consumer education for Credit.com.

You’re paying a foreign company. If you’re traveling overseas, especially in a country where card fraud is more prevalent, or if you’re making a payment to a business based overseas, that could get your card flagged, experts say.

Your limit was cut. If you got a limit decrease on a credit card that you forgot about, or if you missed the notification, you could be denied if a purchase would push you over that new limit, says Odysseas Papadimitriou, founder and CEO of Evolution Finance. On a related note, if your card has expired and you’re not using the new one, you could be declined.

Your funds are tied up in a hold. Businesses including gas stations, hotels and rental car companies often put a hold for a certain amount — which can be hundreds of dollars — onto your card when you initiate a purchase, warns Edgar Dworksky, founder of Consumer World. “If you are near your limit before this, these temporary charges could put you at your limit, and subsequent purchases elsewhere will be denied,” he says.

You’re spending big. “A large purchase like electronics, appliances or an expensive vacation all could trigger a decline if it’s outside your normal spending pattern,” Detweiler says. Likewise, if you’re spending big bucks on luxury goods popular with credit card crooks like jewelry or electronics, your issuer might suspect fraud.

TIME energy

Why Airfares Are Rising Despite Lower Fuel Costs

Delta Airlines Inc. Terminal Ahead Of Earnings Figures
A Delta Air Lines Inc. airplane departs Ronald Reagan National Airport in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, July 18, 2014. Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

Airlines stand to gain when gas costs fall

Airlines’ profits have been, yes, taking off this year, and the industry doesn’t seem inclined to change that flight path. The big carriers announced a $4 per ticket price increase Tuesday, even as falling jet fuel prices were delivering an unbudgeted bonus. Although it’s not unusual for a carrier’s announced price increase to get withdrawn when a competitor decides not to play ball, there doesn’t seem to be much resistance to Tuesday’s news.

Were you expecting the carriers to have mercy on you, given that flights are stuffed, there are upcharges for everything from baggage to overhead space to boarding early, and passengers are staging midair cage fights over knee room? Get real. As one airline consultant told me about a year ago, the semi-romantics who used to run the airlines are long gone. Instead, the folks in charge today play hardball. They are running a business, not their advertising agency’s image of air travel.

With seats in shorter supply domestically, that means pricing is going to remain tight. In Delta’s most recent quarter, for instance, its passenger yield — a measure of the average fare paid — increased 1.9%. The company’s results had Richard Anderson, Delta’s chief executive officer, crowing: “While we have more work ahead of us to achieve our long-term financial goals, we expect a record fourth quarter of 2014 with an operating margin of 10%-12%. For the full year, we expect a pre-tax profit in excess of $4 billion.” That’s following a record year last year.

Delta, like other carriers, is managing costs tighter and benefitting from the slide in oil prices. In its most recent quarter, Delta’s fuel cost declined by $23 million. According to the industry trade group A4A, a penny a gallon decrease over a year saves the carriers $190 million. Delta expects fuel to drop from $2.90 a gallon to between $2.69 and $2.74 a gallon in the current quarter.

Delta notes that there are three major drivers of airline economics: aircraft maintenance, ownership cost and fuel cost. The first two are fairly predictable costs that management has some control over. Fuel is a variable cost with a capital V. When oil was soaring, the airlines were losing billions and eventually were driven into bankruptcy. They have emerged, recapitalized and rationalized: they can make money even with much higher fuel costs. But they can make a lot more money with lower fuel costs as well as by raising prices. There is no reason not to do both. “Domestically, clearly we are in an environment where the carriers are rational, and financially motivated,” American Scott Kirby told analysts recently. ” In other words, don’t expect any free drinks any time soon.

TIME Earnings

Yahoo’s Minuscule Growth Enough to Exceed Expectations

Yahoo! President and CEO Marissa Mayer delivers a keynote address at the 2014 International CES in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Yahoo! President and CEO Marissa Mayer delivers a keynote address at the 2014 International CES in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller—Getty Images

The search giant had seen its revenue fall in four of the previous five quarters

Yahoo said Tuesday that third-quarter grew 1%. Here are the most important points from the company’s earnings report.

What you need to know: Yahoo beat Wall Street estimates with $1.15 billion in third-quarter revenue, up from $1.14 during the same quarter last year. Surprising analysts is always nice, but the Internet search giant should be especially happy about the revenue bump, even if it is just a 1% increase. Sales had declined in four of the previous five quarters, including a 3% year-over-year drop in this year’s second quarter.

Yahoo also reported earnings excluding certain costs (and a huge windfall from selling shares in the initial public offering of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba) of 52 cents per share, which trounced analyst predictions of 30 cents per share. The company’s profit jumped to $6.8 billion compared with the help of $6.3 billion in cash, after tax, that the company netted from selling a chunk of its Alibaba shares in September. In the year-ago quarter, Yahoo had reported a profit of $297 million.

Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer described the quarter in a statement as solid.

“We achieved this revenue growth through strong growth in our new areas of investment – mobile, social, native and video – despite industry headwinds in some of our large, legacy businesses,” Mayer said.

Yahoo shares soared in after-hours trading, gaining almost 2.8% after finishing Tuesday trading up by 2.3% – one of many stocks on the tech-heavy Nasdaq composite to enjoy a strong day.

The big number: Yahoo said its third-quarter mobile revenue topped $200 million, the first time the company has revealed the amount of money it makes from showing ads on mobile devices. The company said gross mobile sales for the year will exceed $1.2 billion. Mayer said that Yahoo’s mobile investments – which include a $300 million acquisition of mobile analytics startup Flurry – have paid off for the company. In the current quarter, mobile revenue made up only around 17% of overall sales, far less than rivals like Facebook and Twitter.

“Not only are our mobile products attracting praise and engagement from users and industry awards, they are generating meaningful revenue for Yahoo,” Mayer said.

Meanwhile, Yahoo’s display ad revenue – the equivalent on online billboard ads – dipped again, falling 5% year-over-year to $447 million in the third quarter. (Interestingly, Yahoo said in its earnings release that the number of ads sold in the third quarter increased about 24%, but that seems to have been offset by the fact that the price of each ad declined by an equal amount.) Search ads continue to grow for Yahoo, though, with third-quarter revenue in that sector rising 4% to $452 million.

What you might have missed: Yahoo plans to spend some of the more than $6 billion in cash it netted from the recent Alibaba IPO on one or more tech start-up acquisitions, according to The Wall Street Journal. Mayer is expected to discuss Yahoo’s plan for potential acquisitions as well as cost-cutting measures – a discussion that comes a few weeks after activist investor Starboard Value revealed it had taken a stake in Yahoo and pushed for Mayer to reduce costs and consider a combination with AOL.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com

TIME Security

Experts Warn Corporate Boards Aren’t Protecting Us From Hackers

A shopper walks past a large Home Depot logo inside a store
A shopper walks past a large Home Depot logo inside a store in New York,Tuesday, May 16, 2006. Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

In the wake of hacks agains Target, Home Depot and JPMorgan, analysts say companies' boards need to be more vigilant on cybersecurity

As an increasing number of major retailers and financial institutions are falling victim to hacks like those against Target, Home Depot and JPMorgan, many experts say corporate boards aren’t doing enough to protect customers from cybersecurity breaches.While corporate boards are a step removed from companies’ day-to-day operations, the increasing risk of data breaches means that boardmembers need to be more involved in cybersecurity, observers say, whether by pushing for security oversight or reshuffling executives who don’t react properly to crises.

“We live in the post-Target era,” said John Kindervag, security analyst at Forrester. “There’s a moral obligation to consider firing an executive team because of a data breach. It’s a huge business failure.”

Corporate boards rarely review cybersecurity plans or involve themselves in the particulars of data protection, traditionally viewing security as an information technology problem. According to a PriceWaterhouseCoopers report released last month, just 42% of 9,700 executives in over 150 countries said their boards are involved in security strategy; just 25% said their boards are involved in reviewing security and privacy threats.

“They’ll say to the CEO, what are we doing about security, and then don’t get involved at all until they get breached,” says Avivah Litan, security analyst at Gartner. “Most companies don’t communicate at that level with the board. They’re out of touch and they’re totally clueless about information security.”

Securities and Exchange Commissioner Luis Aguilar put it more gingerly to board directors earlier this month at a New York Stock Exchange cybersecurity conference. “There may be a gap that exists between the magnitude of the exposure presented by cyber-risks and the steps, or lack thereof, that many corporate boards have taken to address these risks,” Aguilar said. There’s a discrepancy, too, between what shareholders demand of boards and what they’re actually doing — a survey published by Institutional Shareholder Services (ISS) last month shows that nearly 70% of shareholders view board oversight actions prior to hacking incidents as “very important.”

Negligent boards may find themselves facing questions from angry shareholders and customers after a cyber breach. In June, ISS made the unusual recommendation that Target shareholders oust seven out of 10 members of its board after credit card information belonging to 40 million customers was compromised, laying blame on two board committees in particular.

“The data breach revealed that the company was inadequately prepared for the significant risks of doing business in today’s electronic commerce environment,” ISS advised. “The responsibility for oversight of these risks lies squarely with the Audit Committee and the Corporate Responsibility Committee.” Shareholders re-elected the board, but ISS’ condemnation was a wake-up call for retailers. Target is now facing an investigation from the Federal Trade Commission into the details of the breach.

Home Depot, meanwhile, was a founding member of a threat-sharing group of major retailers earlier this year, and its board received regular updates on cybersecurity, according to a spokesman. “IT and IT security have regularly been items on our board meeting agendas for several years now, and the board has received regular updates on the breach since it occurred,” said that spokesman. But the hardware retailer was caught flat-footed by a data breach this year that jeopardized 56 million customers’ credit cards, and managers ignored weaknesses in cyber defense before the attack, the New York Times reported last month.

Analysts say a strong board of directors should know how to ask management the right questions about cybersecurity. “The board is not responsible for identifying risk, but it sure as hell needs to know that management understands that responsibility and knows how to respond to it,” said Rick Steinberg, former governance practice leader at PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Ultimately, it might be a financial motivation that gets corporate boards to take a closer look at their firms’ cybersecurity standards. Target’s net income dropped more than $400 million in the quarter the breach was announced compared to the year before; the company said direct costs from the data breach would reach $148 million in the second quarter of 2014 alone. The total expense of any breach, including lost profits from nervous consumers, are often incalculable. “A data breach is the equivalent of an oil spill,” said Kindervag. “It’s a fundamental business issue.”

TIME Earnings

Coke Expands Its Cost-Cutting Program as Earnings Slide

Cans of Coca-Cola
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The North America market remains a problem for the beverage giant and its top rival PepsiCo

Beverages giant Coca-Cola reported a 14% decline in third-quarter net income on Tuesday on a muted volume performance. Here’s what you need to know.

What you need to know: The North America market remains a problem for Coke and top rival PepsiCo, with both of the consumer-products behemoths reporting muted results for that market in the latest quarter, even as data shows Americans are spending more at grocery stores. Coke’s North America unit case volume was down 1% in the latest period, while Pepsi earlier this month reported flat revenue for the Americas beverages business.

Consumers are spending more on fresh produce, fresh grocery products and in the beverages aisle, favoring juices, flavored waters and other items that have fewer calories and less sugar than what Coke and Pepsi use in their products. Demand for carbonated soft drinks, the biggest category in the beverages business, has suffered a nearly decade-long slide. Coke on Tuesday said the “Share a Coke” campaign helped the company gain share in the sparkling beverage segment in North America, but volume still declined. Demand was also weaker for juices and sports drinks, though demand grew for tea, energy drinks and water.

Coke also didn’t post especially strong growth in any of the other markets it serves to help offset the North America weakness. Volume grew just 2% in Latin America and the Asia Pacific, and it feel 5% in Europe. The Eurasia and Africa region’s volume grew 5%.

The big number: 53 cents — that’s the adjusted profit Coke reported for the third quarter, and it matched the year-ago level and also what analysts had projected. The reported bottom line was dragged lower by $270 million in charges tied to a move to refranchise some bottling partners in North America.

Revenue totaled $11.98 billion, falling slightly short of the $12.12 billion projected by analysts. Citing some currency exchange fluctuations, Coke said it now expects profit for all of 2014 to be “below its long-term EPS growth targets.”

What you might have missed: Coke is targeting annualized savings of $3 billion per year by 2019. Coke issued a second press release Tuesday morning touting an “expanded productivity program” (typically, corporate lingo for cost-cutting) and a move to streamline its operations. While Chief Executive Muhtar Kent said Coke sees a challenging macroeconomic environment in 2015, the company’s plans to restructure its global supply chain, among other moves, will help the beverages company achieve a profit before tax target of 6% to 8%.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com

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