TIME Crime

Watch Live: Michael Brown’s Family Speaks Ahead of Ferguson Grand Jury Decision

Decision expected soon

The family of Michael Brown, the unarmed black teenager whose shooting death at the hands of a white police officer sparked violent protests in Ferguson, Mo. earlier this year, is holding a news conference Friday ahead of a decision by a grand jury probing the case.

Attorney General Eric Holder appealed for calm in a video Thursday ahead of the decision, and Brown’s father has also called for calm.

Watch the news conference live above.

Read next: Michael Brown’s Family Calls for Calm as Ferguson Grand Jury Nears Decision

TIME Know Right Now

Know Right Now: From Obama’s Immigration Move to a Legendary Director’s Passing

Watch today's Know Right Now to catch up on the latest trending stories

In today’s trending stories, President Obama took executive action on Thursday to impose sweeping immigration reforms. His GOP critics say the plan is equivalent to amnesty for undocumented immigrants.

All 50 states saw below freezing temperatures this week, while Buffalo, New York, was buried beneath 85 inches of “Lake Effect” snow.

The world’s biggest chocolate makers said the planet is facing a shortage of the product, due to dry weather in West Africa, fungal disease, and China’s growing appetite for it.

And lastly, film director Mike Nichols died this week at 83 years old. He is one of a handful of people who has won Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony Awards.

TIME Television

One Direction And Jimmy Kimmel Take ‘Cutest Selfie Ever’

Complete with children, feather boas, and of course, a boy band

Jimmy Kimmel was on a mission to take the “cutest selfie ever” with boy band One Direction on his show Thursday. To make it cuter, he added children, puppies, bunny ears, feather boas, stuffed animals and a mini unicorn. Of course, fans of One Direction would say the cutest part of the picture was the members of the internationally known boy band themselves.

One Direction’s recently released their newest album “Four.”

 

TIME The Brief

#TheBrief: The Air Bag Recall That’s Affecting Millions of Cars

Exploding air bags made by Takata Corporation

Exploding air bags have led to one of the biggest auto recalls in history, one that’s five times larger than GM’s ignition-switch fiasco. How did this happen?

Several large automakers including BMW and Honda have used the air bags, made by Japanese company Takata Corporation, the largest supplier of air bags parts in the world. Now they have had to recall millions of cars after the defective driver’s-side air bags have been blamed for at least five deaths and more than 100 injuries in the past decade.

Watch #TheBrief to find out more about the recall.

TIME Know Right Now

Know Right Now: From the Arctic Chill to ‘Lake Effect’ Snow

Catch up on the latest trending stories

Among today’s trending stories, all 50 states saw below-freezing temperatures this week. More than 100 cities could break records for the lowest temperatures this time of year. As of noon on Wednesday, there were at least five deaths caused by the storm.

“Lake Effect” snow occurs when cold atmosphere moves across warmer lake water. The combination provides energy to absorb water vapor, which freezes and is dumped onto land. This weather phenomenon has pummeled the Great Lakes region and parts of upstate New York.

Buffalo has been hit with at least 76 inches of snow so far, a national record. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo dispatched the National Guard to assist in the most affected areas.

TIME The Brief

#TheBrief: How Ebola and Fungus May Speed Up the Chocolate Shortage

China's growing demand for chocolate may also be contributing

A recent chocolate shortage has seen cocoa farmers unable to keep up with the public’s insatiable appetite for the treat–and the world’s largest chocolate producers, drought, Ebola and a fungal disease may all be to blame.

Meanwhile, China’s demand for chocolatey goodness has more than doubled in the past ten years, and the country is the fastest growing sector for confectionery products in the world.

Watch #TheBrief to find out what’s being done to save chocolate and what the consequences of this shortage might be for you.

TIME Environment

Keystone XL Pipeline by the Numbers

The Senate will vote Tuesday on the Keystone XL Pipeline, which will stretch from Alberta, Canada, to the Gulf of Mexico. Watch what you need to know about the 1,179-mile project.

President Obama will have the chance to approve or veto the Keystone XL Pipeline, of which 40% has already been built, after the Senate takes a vote Tuesday.

Environmentalists argue that the pipeline will cause toxic oil spills and pollute water supplies, though an environmental impact review released by the State Department concluded that the pipeline will not result in a significant increase on greenhouse gases.

Here’s a by-the-numbers look at the project.

TIME Know Right Now

Know Right Now: From the Pope’s Planned U.S. Visit to the Chocolate Shortage

Watch today's Know Right Now to catch up on the latest trending stories

In today’s trending stories, the Pope confirmed plans for his first U.S. visit as pontiff in 2015. He will hold mass on the Ben Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia, where an estimated 2 million people are expected to show up.

The nation is preparing for the grand jury’s decision over whether to indict Ferguson cop Darren Wilson in the August shooting death of unarmed teenager Michael Brown.

The DEA conducted spot-checks on the medical staffs of several NFL teams for allegedly administering possible illegal drug prescriptions.

And lastly, chocolatiers say dry weather, fungal disease and farmer migration are slowing down the production of cocoa, leading to a worldwide shortage of chocolate.

TIME space

Comet Probe Philae Runs Out Of Power

It had gotten through 80% of its scheduled observations

The first human probe to land on a comet went dark Friday night while sending data back to the European Space Agency.

In an online statement, the head of operations for the probe said, “this machine performed magnificently under tough conditions, and we can be fully proud of the incredible scientific success Philae has delivered.”

The probe lost power after bouncing into a shady area of the comet during its landing. Before losing power, the Philae accomplished about 80% of its scheduled observations.

Philae could soon regain power if its solar panels are able to pick up enough sunlight.

 

 

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