TIME espionage

How Real Is the Threat of a Cyberattack?

The threat of a state-sponsored cyberattack on the U.S. is inevitable and could potentially destabilize the global system

TIME editor-at-large Ian Bremmer explains how cyberattacks from state-sponsored hackers and terrorists pose a risk for the U.S. government and financial institutions. Hackers are able to uncover state secrets, trade information and technology ideas.

TIME Foreign Policy

Watch President Obama Speak About Fight Against ISIS

Due to speak from the Pentagon

President Obama visited the Pentagon Monday for a briefing on the fight against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS), as the U.S. attempts to reverse advances made by the Islamist group in recent weeks.

TIME El Salvador

Meet the Crocodile ‘Nanny’ Who Is Trying to Preserve the Species

The crocodile "nanny" acts as mother to newly hatched crocs

Rangers at the Barra de Santiago nature reserve in El Salvador are working hard to preserve the American crocodile, which is on the brink of extension in the area. In addition to doing educational outreach programs, Jose Antonio Villeda, a park ranger, has personally taken on the task of preserving the species by caring for baby crocodiles, AFP reports.

Villeda, known as a crocodile “nanny,” asks local residents to bring him crocodile eggs that they find, and then he takes care of them for 85 days until they hatch. He then raises the crocodiles for approximately two months.

“What is gratifying is that we now have a real crocodile population. We have gone from five to more than 200,” Villeda told AFP.

The crocodile population in the area has significantly decreased as a result of hunting and egg consumption, prompting park rangers in the 1990s to begin monitoring crocodiles’ nests.

[AFP]

 

TIME States

Why This July 4th Will Be The Biggest One Yet

The numbers don't lie

As Americans prepare to toast the Founding Fathers and the spirit of 1776, the American Pyrotechnics Association has estimated that this year’s sales of sparklers, cones, fountains and other “backyard” fireworks could exceed $725 million, a record for this category of fireworks.

But that’s not the only dazzling number to expect for this July 4th. From purchasing 700 million pounds of chicken to spending $1 billion in beer, Americans will celebrate their independence on a larger scale than ever this year.

 

TIME Solutions That Matter

Graphene: The Material Of Tomorrow

Meet the wonder material that is one hundred thousandth of the thickness of a human hair, yet is a hundred times stronger than steel. Graphene has been called "the most exciting material of the 21st century," yet we have barely scratched the surface of what it is capable of doing

TIME Cuba

Watch President Obama Announce Cuba Embassy Opening

The U.S. and Cuba re-established diplomatic relations earlier this year

The United States and Cuba will open embassies in each other’s capital cities, formally rebuilding diplomatic relations for the first time since 1961

TIME White House

Watch a Mashup of President Obama Getting Heckled

"As a general rule, I am just fine with a few hecklers—but not when I’m up in the house"

President Obama is no stranger to hecklers.

But, every man has his limits. Watch the video above to see how the Commander-in-Chief has responded to various interruptions throughout his two terms in office.

One key takeaway: You can heckle him all you want, but when you’re an invited guest to the White House, too much heckling can get you thrown out.

As Obama said after being heckled at a recent event at 1600 Pennsylvania: “I am just fine with a few hecklers—but not when I’m up in the house. You know what I mean? You know, my attitude is if you’re eating the hors d’oeuvres—you know what I’m saying?”

 

TIME The Answers Issue

This Is the Safest Place to Sit on a Plane

Where you should sit next time you get onboard

Statistics show that the middle seats in the rear of an aircraft historically have the highest survival rates.

This is based on a study of aircraft accidents in the last 35 years. TIME went through the Federal Aviation Administration’s CSRTG Aircraft Accident Database looking for accidents with both fatalities and survivors. We found 17 with seating charts that could be analyzed. The oldest accident that fit our criteria was in 1985; the most recent was in 2000.

The analysis found that the seats in the back third of the aircraft had a 32% fatality rate, compared with 39% in the middle third and 38% in the front third.

Looking at row position, we found that the middle seats in the rear of the aircraft had the best outcomes (28% fatality rate). The worst-faring seats were on the aisle in the middle third of the cabin (44% fatality rate).

After a crash, survivors who are near an exit are more likely to get out alive, according to a study published in 2008 from the University of Greenwich which looked at emergency exit usage after an accident.

Of course, the chances of dying in an aircraft accident have less to do with where you sit and more to do with the circumstances surrounding the crash. If the tail of the aircraft takes the brunt of the impact, the middle or front passengers may fare better than those in the rear. We found that survival was random in several accidents — those who perished were scattered irregularly between survivors. It’s for this reason that the FAA and other airline safety experts say there is no safest seat on the plane.

But one thing is certain: Flying is very safe, and it’s only gotten safer in recent decades. This is especially true compared with other means of transportation. The lifetime odds of perishing in a car are 1 in 112. As a pedestrian, the odds are 1 in 700 and on a motorbike, they’re 1 in 900. But on a plane? The odds of dying drop to just 1 in 8,000.

This article was originally published in the July 13 issue of TIME.

TIME Crime

Watch South Carolina Governor Give Emotional Speech After Shooting

"We woke up today, and the heart and soul of South Carolina was broken," the governor said on Thursday

South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley fought back tears as she addressed the media following a shooting at a historically black church in Charleston, S.C., that left nine people dead.

“We have some grieving to do, and we’ve got some pain we have to go through,” she said. “We are a strong and faithful state. We love our state, we love our country and most importantly, we love each other.”

Authorities arrested the suspected shooter, Dylann Roof, 21, on Thursday during a traffic stop.

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