TIME

27 Pinterest Boards That Will Actually Make Your Life Better

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Seriously life-changing

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This post is in partnership with The Muse. The article below was originally published on The Muse.
TIME Careers & Workplace

10 Companies That Need to Hire You This Month

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Looking for a good new job? August could be your month

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This post is in partnership with The Muse. The article below was originally published on The Muse.

If a career change is on your mind, we know it’s not the easiest thing in the world to find a company you can feel at home at—which is why The Muse is here to help!

We’ve rounded up some great companies that are looking to hire like crazy this month. Check out the listings below to get a sense of why they’re awesome, and see how you might have the chance to work for them.

1. Counsyl

Where: San Francisco, Chicago, Cleveland, and Richmond, VA

Counsyl wants to give people more information about their bodies. With a simple saliva sample, Counsyl can give you easy online access to information about things such as genetic diseases and inherited cancer. And more information means more power to make smart decisions about your future and family! Want to help with this important mission? Counsyl is currently looking for new team members in almost every department.

See the Jobs

2. Worldwide101

Where: Flexible

Worldwide101 helps connect talented professionals who want flexible work options with small businesses, entrepreneurs, and startups around the world to provide virtual support in all sorts of things: administration, customer service, social media, project management, design, web development, and more. Besides the virtual assistant and multilingual virtual assistant teams that the company is always looking to grow, Worldwide101 is in serious need of some help on the operations and account management front.

See the Jobs

3. Deloitte

Where: All Around the U.S.

For businesses around the world, Deloitte is known as one of the largest professional services organizations in the U.S., delivering innovative solutions to the complex business problems. For employees, Deloitte is known as the place to get a seriously rewarding career in auditing, tax, consulting, financial advisory, and even engineering. Check out the hoards of job openings to find the role for you.

See the Jobs

4. Nitro

Where: San Francisco, Melbourne, and Dublin

Nitro is changing the way the world—including more than 50% of the Fortune 500—works with documents. From the desktop to the cloud, Nitro makes it easy to create, edit, share, sign, and collaborate—anytime and anywhere. Even if you’re not a techie, there are plenty of roles for you here, so check them out and get pumped to become a Nitronaut!

See the Jobs

5. Nextdoor

Where: San Francisco

Nextdoor is the new social network for neighbors, letting you share important information with—and just generally get to know—the people who live around you. The company wants to use technology to help strengthen community, one neighborhood at a time, and needs your help to do it.

See the Jobs

6. LivePerson

Where: New York, San Francisco, Atlanta, and Around the World

LivePerson wants to help companies give customers superior support in spite of (or with the help of) the digital technology. This leader in digital engagement needs new team members across the board to help it become the number one place businesses go when they want to connect more with their customers.

See the Jobs

7. The Nerdery

Where: Chicago, Minneapolis, and Kansas City

The developers at The Nerdery collaborate with advertisers, marketers, and other creatives to build award-winning interactive projects. It’s the perfect place for talented developers with a creative streak to work on super rewarding things. Ready to join this team of nerds? The Nerdery is looking for tons of new engineers, along with project management and sales pros.

See the Jobs

8. BrightRoll

Where: San Francisco, New York, and Chicago

BrightRoll is the largest independent video advertising platform, helping advertisers move away from broadcast and reach consumers across the screens of today: computers, smartphones, tablets, and connected TVs. If you’re a marketing, PR, or engineering professional, BrightRoll especially needs your help to change the future of ads.

See the Jobs

9. Squarespace

Where: New York

On a mission to make the web a more beautiful place, Squarespace has tools to help users create incredible websites—without even having to know how to code! Now that everyone is looking to make their mark on the internet, Squarespace is sure to contintue growing, and you could be there as it becomes big.

See the Jobs

10. Facebook

Where: Silicon Valley, New York, and Seattle

You know what Facebook is. But did you know it’s at the center of people sharing interests, forming new relationships, and unifying large populations to make the world a smaller, friendlier place? And did you know it’s an awesome place to work, offering plenty of perks to help creativity and productivity thrive? Check out open jobs today and find out for yourself.

See the Jobs

TIME Careers & Workplace

10 More Companies That Are Hiring Like Crazy Right Now

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Tetra Images—Getty Images/Brand X

These companies are growing like crazy

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This post is in partnership with The Muse. The article below was originally published on The Muse.

Business is a tricky game, and there’s no telling how long it can take to grow any small company. But when companies are able to strike their market when it’s incredibly hot, rapid growth in a short amount of time is inevitable.

These 10 companies have done just that, and the results are going to be incredible. Bonus: If you get in on the ground floor, you can say you helped make it all happen. Check them out, and land your next job at one of them.

1. Handybook

Where: New York

If you live in New York, you’ve likely seen this company’s ads all over the subway. This is just one way that Handybook, an online service that connects its users to top-notch professionals who help get household chores done, is making waves across over 26 cities in the U.S. With more and more professionals wanting to spend time at work and with family, this company is providing a resource that everyone is benefiting from. Get ready to see major growth.

See the Jobs

2. iCracked

Where: Redwood Shores, CA

Admit it: You’re as hooked to your phone as we are, and when something goes wrong, it’s the only thing on your mind until its fixed. iCracked makes repairing iPhones, iPads, and iPods super easy and convenient. With on-demand iTechs, customers around the world can get the help they are desperate for with the click of a button.

See the Jobs

3. Thinkful

Where: New York

Founded in 2012, Thinkful uses mentorship to teach students one of the most useful and necessary tools: coding. With easy to access web and mobile apps, users are provided with one-on-one training and a curated curriculum. The world is moving toward tech, and Thinkful is going to be part of it because of its awesome tools.

See the Jobs

4. Recombine

Where: New York

Recombine’s goal is to improve health outcomes based on actionable and responsible genetic testing. Using genetics as its platform, this company is able to help its patients make the best decisions for their families. Founded by experts in fertility, clinical genetics, bioinformatics, and computer science, Recombine knows exactly what it’s doing when it comes to the intersection of technology and science.

See the Jobs

5. OwnLocal

Where: Austin, TX

Print media is facing unprecedented challenges to its model, and OwnLocal has an ambitious goal: to be the digital ad agency for local media and help bring the whole industry into the digital age. And with more than 400 media companies using the platform, it’s clear the company is on the right track.

See the Jobs

6. Findr Group

Where: New York and Los Angeles

Named one of the fastest growing companies in the U.S. in 2013, there’s no question that Findr Group is going places. This full-service marketing agency helps clients effectively communicate with their audiences; clients including the likes of DISH Network, Prudential, and Caesars Entertainment. Get ready to see the company’s name—and potentially yours—on campaigns all over the world.

See the Jobs

7. TicketLeap

Where: Philadelphia

With events of all kinds taking place every day in every city, TicketLeap is making experiences way easier to enjoy and take part in. With apps for both Andoid and iOS, clients are able to control their ticketing experience with do-it-yourself technology. This company view culture as the world’s biggest asset, and its products reflect that.

See the Jobs

8. Virool

Where: San Francisco

Virool is a powerful video service that allows over 100 million viewers to connect to a global network of content. Plus, with affordable low-price campaigns, users can distribute their own YouTube video content to a series of online publishers. With multimedia leading the way for everything web-related, there’s no doubt that this company is going to seriously take off.

See the Jobs

9. Voxy

Where: New York

In a continually more globalized world and economy, Voxy is helping people learn different languages in an easy, realistic way. Forget about textbooks and weekly classes—this company provides an innovative context-based approach to language acquisition. You know that this company is going to be big whenBusiness Insider names it as one of the “10 Best U.S. Tech Companies to Work For.”

See the Jobs

10. Contently

Where: New York

This software company, founded in 2010, helps independent journalists find work in a bad economy and locates talent and content for publishers’ platforms. Its tools are helping bridge the gaps of content creation, allowing for a broader audience to find out what’s going on in the world from people who love sharing news.

See the Jobs

TIME Careers & Workplace

10 Companies That Are Hiring Like Crazy Right Now

Great companies with great job openings

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This post is in partnership with The Muse. The article below was originally published on The Muse.

TIME Careers & Workplace

Here’s How to Creep Out of Work Without Anybody Noticing

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The muse

What do you do when you’re gainfully employed, yet dying to land a more interesting, more profitable job?

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This post is in partnership with The Muse. The article below was originally published on The Muse.

By Jenny Foss

You’re dying to tell your favorite client how much you’d love to work for her firm. But your boss and your client do yoga together. Surely they’d talk.

Your friend who got laid off two months ago just landed an amazing new gig. A recruiter found her via LinkedIn, and noted that she was both qualified and currently available.

So what do you do when you’re gainfully employed, yet dying to land a more interesting, more profitable, or more fulfilling role? How do you make it clear to key influencers that you’re “open to opportunities” without full-on outing yourself to your colleagues or, worse, your boss?

Think “The Art of Allure.”

Just as you might use subtle, yet intentional, methods to entice a romantic suitor, you can use the professional version of these same techniques to woo recruiters or other corporate decision makers—without your boss figuring out what you’re up to. Consider these:

1. Hint That You’re Available

Subtle hints can go a long way, and your LinkedIn summary is a perfect place to start. While you can’t come right out and announce that you’re looking (like your friend who got laid off did), you can present a call to action in the summary that encourages people to contact you and provides a very easy way to do just that.

Example: “I’m fascinated by all things digital marketing and enjoy meeting like-minded people. Feel free to contact me at YourEmail@gmail.com.”

As a recruiter, when I see that someone’s presenting his email address right in the summary, I assume he’s open to being contacted about job opportunities.

(Here are four more elements of a great LinkedIn summary.)

2. Be Interested

Everybody—and I mean everybody—likes feeling like their work matters and their efforts are being noted. Use this to your advantage. Approach people you think may be influential to your next career move in a way that is genuine, seems curious, and makes them feel important. Ask thoughtful questions about their own careers and contributions, in a way that suggests you’re just sincerely interested in their work, not looking for something from them.

By building rapport with those who may be beneficial to your growth, you may have the opportunity over time to reveal your specific career goals and interests—with less risk that they’ll rat you out to your employer.

3. Conveniently Appear in All the Right Places

Remember in high school when you just “happened” to walk by your crush’s locker at the precise moment he arrived each day? Coincidence? Of course not. You had that one figure out to the millisecond. (“Oh, hiiiiii.”)

Do the same now, minus the lockers. Figure out where the influencers in your industry hang out—both online and in person. Maybe it’s a regular meetup through your professional association, maybe a LinkedIn group or TweetChat. Wherever they congregate, consider stopping by, weighing in, or saying hello from time to time. The more you can get on the radar of people who matter to your career growth, the better.

4. Save Some of the Good Stuff for Later

Sharing every single thing about you on a first date isn’t alluring, it’s weird. A similar principle applies when you’re updating your LinkedIn profile as a means to quietly entice others. If you make a zillion updates all at once—especially if you do so without turning your Activity Broadcasts off—someone you work with is going to notice. And they’re going to wonder what’s up.

If you’re updating your profile with the hopes of positioning yourself as open to new opportunities, think seriously about editing in stages. Save some of the good stuff for later, so that you don’t out yourself as an obvious job seeker.

It’s not simple to simultaneously hold down one job while secretly exploring others, but if you’ve got some time to strategically allure the influencers, you might just land “the one.”

More from The Muse

TIME Careers & Workplace

10 Super Simple Ways to Be a Better Writer

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TheMuse

The written word is king. Time to get more comfortable with it

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This post is in partnership with The Muse. The article below was originally published on The Muse.

By Alexandra Franzen

Do you enjoy writing? Does it come naturally to you? Do colleagues praise you for your crisp, articulate, Nobel Laureate-worthy email updates?

Congratulations! Because if you work in an office or run your own business, you’re likely to spend about a quarter of your workday doing one thing:

Writing.

Oh, and that’s just the portion of your day that you’ll spend writing emails.

That figure doesn’t account for reports, proposals, best practice guidelines, blog posts, Facebook updates, tweets, texts, chapters of your forthcoming memoirs, that TED Talk script you’ve been tinkering with for the last 18 months, and the occasional hand-written “thank you” note.

We live in an era where the written word is King.

And if you’re going to write 40,000+ words this year—at minimum!—you might as well learn how to do your absolute best.

Here are 10 ways to become a better writer, right away.

(The kind of writer whose words get results.)

1. Get Clear

Before you sit down to write (anything), ask yourself: Why am I writing?

What’s the desired outcome that you want with this particular piece of writing?

Are you writing to brighten someone’s morning? Motivate your team to head back into the ring after a crushing defeat? Encourage folks to say “yes” to your new meeting time?

The best writing tends to have one clear, ringing intention. Choose it—and commit.

2. Get to the Point

In the business world, brevity is gold. (Related: Are Your Emails Too Long? Probably)

If you’re struggling to get to the point, take a moment to think about the person (or people) that you’re writing to, and create a roadmap for yourself by filling in the following statements:

The reason I am writing is:

What I want you to know is:

What I want you to do is:

Get those three points down pat. Then refer to them as you write to keep yourself on track.

3. Strip it Down

Albert Einstein once said, “If you can’t explain it to a six-year-old, you don’t understand it yourself.”

Imagine that you’re writing for an audience of little kids—impatient, easily distracted, with zero tolerance for jargon.

You can practice—out in the real world—by having actual conversations with kids. Try explaining to a toddler what you do for a living, for starters. You’ll see, very quickly, if your elevator pitch is clear and intriguing—or not. (If not? Here are my tips for how to tell people what you do—and be remembered.)

4. Write From Your Happy Place

Ever notice how when you’re stressed out and trying to “force” yourself to write something amazing, it almost never works?

Research shows that getting yourself into a happy, relaxed state—think: taking a shower—is the key to creativity-on-command. When your body is experiencing a rush of dopamine, that’s when those a-ha! moments (“Ooh! I’ve got the perfect title for my presentation!”) tend to happen.

Can’t take a shower at work? No worries. There are plenty of other ways to get into your happy place before you sit down to write. Play energizing music, light a scented candle, bounce on an exercise ball—whatever it takes to help you unclench and relax!

5. Give Yourself a Time Limit

For most people, the longer you fuss over a piece of writing, the worse it gets.

When you have a clear reason for writing and feel happy and relaxed (see tip #4), your first draft is usually best. There’s no need to endlessly chew it over.

Clearing out your inbox, for example? Give yourself a time limit—say, two minutes per email—to prevent yourself from slipping into analysis-paralysis.

(You can set up a “smart playlist” in iTunes comprised entirely of two-minute songs, to keep yourself rockin’ along. When the song changes—hit “send” and move on!)

6. Ask, “What Would My Hero Write?”

If you’re struggling with a sensitive piece of writing where hitting the right emotional tone is essential, try channeling one of your personal heroes.

“What would Mister Rogers write in this situation?” “What would the Dalai Lama say?” “How would Richard Branson handle this email chain?”

7. Close Strong

Lost in a sea of never-ending email threads? Questions building upon questions, never leading to decisive action?

Try taking a decisive stance, rather than wrapping up your writing with an open-ended prompt.

Think: “In my opinion, the following approach is the best choice. If you agree, write back to say ‘yes,’ and I’ll get started.”

Not: “So, what do you guys think? I’m open to everyone’s input!”

8. Use the 7 Magic Words

“All I need from you right now.”

Kick these words up to the top of your correspondence, as in:

“I’m so excited that you’re going to deliver a keynote at our annual conference.

All I need from you right now is the title of your talk, a headshot, and your bio.”

These seven magic words give your reader a clear assignment, and put them at ease. (“Ahhh—that’s all? No problem. Done.”)

You can always add more information down below, if necessary (“Here are a few other things to know—for later.”)

9. Say it Out Loud

Whenever possible, read your writing out loud.

Does it sound like it was written by a human being or a cyborg? Are you stumbling over excessively long sentences? Catch any typos or duplicate words? If so, tweak and read it out loud again.

If reading aloud isn’t possible—because you don’t want to disturb your colleagues—try lightly tapping a finger on your desk or thigh as you silently read each word in your head. (It’s bizarre, but it works almost as well as reading out loud.)

10. Be a Daymaker

David Wagner, CEO of Juut Salonspa, often speaks about being a “Daymaker”—not just going through the motions at work, but actively choosing to be a source of positivity and encouragement. Choosing to make someone’s day.

With everything you write—every email, every text, every tweet—you have an opportunity to make someone’s day. (Or not.)

Often, all it takes is a few words of kindness, a thoughtful compliment, or the kind of insightful reminder that leaves people thinking, “Yeah. I needed that.”

Set “Daymaker” as your barometer of success—for your writing, and for everything you do.

Whether your writing is “perfect” or not, your intent will shine through.

 

More From TheMuse:

TIME Careers & Workplace

7 Ways to Become Your Boss’ Dream Employee

Christian Hoehn—Getty Images

Become a pet in just a few steps

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This post is in partnership with The Muse. The article below was originally published on The Muse.

By Lea McLeod, M.A.

When my client Angela needed help sorting out a number of career-related issues, her relationship with her manager was at the top of the list.

Frankly, it was in shambles. Their working relationship was terrible, they couldn’t get along, and Angela even admitted she thought her boss regretted hiring her.

While I’m sure Angela’s boss had his own faults, I began to realize that Angela had forgotten the fundamental rule of employment: You are there to make your manager successful. Angela was contentious and argumentative, and I could see how her boss might not consider her someone who made his life any easier. (Related: How to play nice with a boss you hate)

On the other hand, when I look back at the best staff I had as a manager, they were the ones doing whatever was needed—and with a great attitude—so that we could all be successful together. In short, they made my life easier.

The good news is, aiming to do the same doesn’t just help your boss out. When your goal is to make your manager more successful—rather than just yourself—you’ll grow as an individual performer, as a professional, and as a part of the team. You’ll learn a lot about what it takes to be a leader, expand your empathic skills, and develop your capacity for leadership. Plus, your boss will likely become your mentor and advocate—which will put many more opportunities within your reach.

It’s not complicated; it just requires a decision and commitment on your part to make it happen. Here are some starter tips for making your manager’s life—and job—easier on a daily basis.

1. Get to Know Your Manager

You can’t make your boss’ life easier if you don’t understand how he fundamentally operates. So, your first step is to figure out what he needs from you—and how you should deliver it.

Does he prefer updates delivered in written form or verbally? Spreadsheets or PowerPoint slides? Does he want information conveyed via email, during a team meeting, or on a voicemail?

Getting to know your manager and his preferences will help you deliver the information he needs, the way he needs it. And who doesn’t appreciate that?

2. Know Your Boss’ Goals

As an employee, you may be so focused on your own goals that you forget that you’re actually there to support your manager achieving her goals. So, make it your job to understand the goals, numbers, projects, and other deliverables your boss is accountable for.

It’s as simple as asking your manager as part of your one-on-one meetings, “If I’m aware of your goals and priorities, I can better support you in achieving them. Can you share these with me, so that I can help you succeed?” Once you understand her goals, you’ll be able to produce deliverables that support her success.

3. Never Let Your Manager Be Blindsided

One rule I always asked my teams to abide by was to never let me be blindsided. In short: No surprises.

So, if you suspect that one of your customers is getting really ticked off and is about to escalate over you—and over your boss—to the VP of customer service, you need to let your manager know. Otherwise, she’ll be completely blindsided by the situation, unprepared to handle it, and likely, not too happy with you.

A blindside creates frustration and chaos that usually ends up in a major time-wasting fire drill. Avoid it, and believe me, your manager will thank you.

4. Don’t Expect Your Boss to Spoon-Feed You

It may sound harsh, but no manager wants to babysit an employee. So if you have questions about health insurance, where to find the pencils, or how to file an expense report, find a colleague who can help you get your answers.

Save one-on-one time with your boss for work-related matters that require collaboration; issues that allow you to flex your intellectual muscles and prove your worth as an employee.

5. Meet (or Beat!) Your Deadlines

When you get an assignment from your manager, enthusiastically commit to the deadline (this means “I’m on it!” not, “I’ll see what I can do”). Then, aim to deliver it at least a day early.

This gives your boss time to flex and adapt in case something comes up—and it always does—rather than sweating it out for you to deliver something at the very last minute.

6. Offer Solutions, Not Problems

Your job is not to constantly point out problems that arise, but rather, to proactively start thinking about what solutions could help address those challenges.

For example, you should never walk into your boss’ office to complain about how the shipping department can never get anything out on time. Instead, you should first go to the shipping department, have a conversation about what can be done to improve the situation, and see what you can do to help.

Then, when you do go to your boss about it, you’ll be able to let him or her know the action you’ve already taken to start solving the problem.

7. Do What You Say; Say What You Do

If you say you’ll finish a report by Friday for the team update, but you come in Friday morning unprepared because “other things came up,” people will probably complain to your manager.

And if that’s not enough, if your manager was counting on that report to take the next steps on a project or to present to the executive team, it will inconvenience (read: annoy) him or her even further.

People who are accountable for their actions and follow up on their commitments are dream employees—and their bosses know they can count on them, no matter what.

Employees who work to make their managers successful are golden. Your manager has a tough job—the stress and pressure of which may not be abundantly evident to you. So, help your manager out and develop your own skills at the same time, by doing everything you can to make your boss’ job easier. When you’re a manager, you’ll appreciate the same.

TIME

This Is Why ‘Follow Your Passion’ Is Terrible Advice

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Peter Dressel—Brand X/Getty Images

Just don't do it

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This post is in partnership with The Muse. The article below was originally published on The Muse.
TIME productivity

The Little-Known Trick That Will Transform Your Life

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Some might call it the ultimate life hack

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This post is in partnership with The Muse. The article below was originally published on The Muse.

By Lily Herman

For most of us, our inboxes are the enemy—a bottomless black hole of pain, despair, and sales coupons we can never crawl out of.

And while you can try to auto-file and unsubscribe your heart out, there are just some emails you can’t avoid. You won’t be able to stop your company from sending you all those team reports or keep that annoying publicist from chucking press release after press release at you.

But there’s one type of email you can stop: Follow-up emails.

Think about it: The more emails you accumulate, the longer it takes you to respond to all of them. The longer it takes you to respond, the more follow-up emails people decide to send just to make sure that you have received their messages. Before long, you’re stuck in a vicious, perpetual cycle. If a plethora of people are sending you “Hey, did you get the message I sent yesterday?” emails, could you imagine how much extra space and time is being wasted?

Luckily, there’s a super easy way to cut down on the number of follow-up messages (and potentially just messages in general) you receive: Put an email auto-responder in place—not just when you’re on vacation, but all the time.

Your auto-response doesn’t have to be long or detailed, but a quick “Hi, I’ve received your email and will get back to you when I can!” message may keep the eager beavers at bay.

Need a little guidance for how to format your auto-response? Try out this template to start:


Hi there! This is just a message to confirm that I’ve received your email. It might take me a little while to follow up, but I will in fact get back to you, so hang tight and don’t worry about sending me a follow-up!

Thanks, and have a great day.


Also keep in mind that being more specific with your auto-responder is best. Give people a general timeline of when you’ll get back to them (“I’ll try to reply to business inquiries within three days”), so they know the difference between you being busy and you using an auto-responder as a way to completely avoid your inbox (we don’t recommend doing this, obviously).

In addition, auto-responders are a great way to direct work to other people who may be better suited (“If you’re contacting me about a marketing opportunity, feel free to email [name], our marketing associate, at [email address]”).

Your auto-responder can also be a more unconventional opportunity to engage people. Feeling a little self-promotional? Add a link to one of your social media pages. Want to preemtively answer some questions? Include a fun FAQ of handling some of the things that people most often come to you for. Interested in getting creative? Link to a recent article you found interesting.

Above all though, make sure you’re using your auto-responder as a way to buy time and not an alternative to answering emails (because, surprise: Auto-responders don’t answer messages for you no matter how long you wait).

But by using this approach, you’ll keep unnecessary emails at bay. You’ll keep your contacts happy. And, best of all, you’ll keep inbox dread from creeping into your day.

TIME leadership

Here’s the Most Useful Personality Quiz You’ll Ever Take

Addictive? Definitely

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This post is in partnership with The Muse. The article below was originally published on The Muse.

By Scott Dockweiler

It was after spending 10 minutes taking a “what kind of sloth are you?” quiz that I knew I had a problem.

Those little BuzzFeed-style quizzes are so addictive (who doesn’t want to know more about their personality?), but unfortunately aren’t really helping any of us get further in life. (I don’t think my co-workers knowing that I’m a “cuddle sloth” is going to help us work better together.)

But, thanks to VisualDNA, us aspirational careerists who also have an unfortunate penchant for taking quizzes have a happy medium: the “Who Am I” assessment.

While it’s built in a similar style to your favorite BuzzFeed quiz—a series of questions that have you choose a photo that correlates with your answer—the results of this one are actually based on a well-respected model of personality assessment called “The Big Five.”

Even better? While there are plenty of places online where you can go to learn your Big Five personality scores, VisualDNA takes it one step further and analyzes your results, explaining how the different elements combine to affect things like your outlook, composure, and resilience. In other words, actual character traits that can affect how you work—and how you can succeed.

So go ahead: Take 10 minutes to take a quiz and be happy knowing that, at the end, you’ll understand a little more about yourself—and be able to put it to good use.

Take the “Who Am I?” Quiz Now!

Read more from The Muse:

What to Do When You’re Just Not That Into an Idea Anymore

The Best Ways to be Productive When Your Energy is Gone

What Your Facebook Profile Says About Your Personality

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