MONEY Love and Money

What Fifty Shades Gets Wrong About Money and Sex

FIFTY SHADES OF GREY
Chuck Zlotnick—Focus Features/Courtesy Everett Collection

The hit novel turned film suggests wealth makes men sexy to women. That's misleading.

Does money make men more attractive to women? On the surface, both popular culture and social science research seem to say yes.

You can’t take a step into the academic literature without tripping over a study showing that women place higher value than men on a partner’s wealth, that women are more attracted to men with nice cars, or that women orgasm more with rich partners.

The standard social science explanation for this phenomenon gets expressed in evolutionary terms: Because impregnating as many women as possible gives a man’s genes an evolutionary advantage, men are more superficial and promiscuous. Conversely, because of the time and energy required for a single pregnancy, women are choosier and more preoccupied with finding a mate rich with resources to provide for offspring. Or, at least, that’s the theory.

The success of the Fifty Shades of Grey franchise certainly does little to dispel all this. The story—for those living under a rock—details the sexual awakening of a young woman seduced by a billionaire, whose physical attractiveness is matched only by his fleet of luxury cars, helicopter, penthouse apartment, and cushy CEO job running his own company. In other words, as author E.L. James has put it, Christian Grey is “every woman’s dream.”

“He’s very good looking, he’s very good at sex, he’s disgustingly rich,” she told TIME.

To be fair, it’s intuitive that a partner with means is more desirable than one without, all else being equal. A recent poll found that 78% of coupled Americans of both sexes say they’d prefer a partner who is good with money over one who’s physically attractive. And if you are a man who feels pressure to impress women with your money, or a woman who felt titillated reading about Christian Grey’s alpha status, you probably buy into the theory without even realizing it.

But as it turns out, this popular narrative about men, women, sex, and money isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

A recent study has found that the common depiction of women primarily seeking out rich and powerful men (and men seeking out young and attractive women) is fairly uncommon in practice and—crucially—doesn’t reflect the reality of successful relationships or what actually makes people happy.

The research, by University of Notre Dame sociologist Elizabeth McClintock, has found that gender differences more or less disappear when you discard self-reported attraction scores and instead examine how real couples pursue one another, date, and settle down. In reality, rich women are just as likely as rich men to use their status to snag a more-attractive mate. And across the board, relationships in which people are essentially trading status for sex tend to be uncommon and short-lived.

Instead, McClintock found that the biggest force that predicts a successful match between people is actually how well all of your qualities match up. That means, for example, that people of similar physical appeal tend to pair off, and those with comparable educations and financial means are drawn together.

What’s perhaps counterintuitive, then, is that a woman seeking a rich man is actually better off getting herself a raise than a makeover. Likewise, a man seeking an attractive lady will see higher returns investing in a gym membership than a brokerage account.

So why does the tale of the rich, experienced man seducing the pretty ingenue persist in popular imagination, not to mention the academic literature? McClintock found that many existing studies took for granted the very gender roles they were supposed to be measuring, examining only women’s attractiveness and men’s status or money, while ignoring men’s appearance and the wealth and education of women.

As Northwestern University psychologist Eli Finkel told New York magazine: “Scientists are humans, too, and we can be inadvertently blinded by beliefs about how the world works.”

Indeed, we’re all better off disposing of our blindfolds—even if they’re made of the finest satin.

 

MONEY

What Today’s Fed Testimony Means for Your Money

Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen prepares to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, before the Senate Banking Committee.
Susan Walsh—AP

Fed chair Janet Yellen is signalling a gradual interest rate hike this year. Here's how to be ready.

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen’s testimony before Congress today bore her usual cautious language. But she signaled that an interest rate hike may still be on the table for later this year.

“If economic conditions continue to improve, as the Committee anticipates, the Committee will at some point begin considering an increase in the target range for the federal funds rate on a meeting-by-meeting basis,” Yellen said.

Yellen worked hard to assure lawmakers that any rise in rates would be gradual, and wouldn’t begin before June. The reason Fed chiefs take such care when talking about interest rates is that rates—and expectations about where they are headed—affect all aspects of Americans’ financial lives, from student loans and mortgages to inflation and retirement portfolios. And right now the Fed has an especially delicate task, because it is trying decide how to transition from the near-zero short-term rates it has stuck to since the 2008 financial crisis.

Here’s what could happen to your money when the Fed finally decides it is time to for interest rates to “lift-off”:

1. Home loans could get pricier

Higher rates make borrowing more expensive for banks, and they in turn pass that expense on to their own borrowers. That generally tamps down inflation but also means it’s harder to get loans for education, cars, and homes.

As a result, it’s a good idea to refinance your mortgage now while rates are relatively cheap. Interest on 30-year fixed rate mortgage remains much lower than before the financial crisis, but rates have been inching up as of late and would grow further if the Fed becomes more hawkish.

2. The “safe” part of your retirement portfolio could take a hit (but that might hurt you less than you fear)

Investors traditionally hold bonds to hedge against stock market risk, but a rise in interest rates will cause the value of a bond portfolio to drop. For those who have time to keep their money invested, however, the higher yields you’ll earn in the future will help make up for a drop in bond prices.

Short-term bonds are less risky than longer-maturity ones, and generally less sensitive to interest rate changes. But how your bonds perform will depend on exactly which interest rates change. The Fed directly controls short-term interest rates, so when they start moving those up, you can expect short-term funds to lose some value.

What happens to longer-term bonds is more ambiguous. They can have significantly more loss potential than short-maturity bonds. But MONEY contributor Carla Fried points out that it’s possible that even as the Fed tries to raise short rates, bonds like the 10-year Treasury could remain in demand by global investors, who see the U.S. economy outperforming Europe and Japan and want to hold a safe-haven asset. That would keep long rates down—bond prices and rates move in opposite directions—and for a time deliver comparatively better returns to investors in longer-term bond funds.

So for many investors, an intermediate-term bond mutual fund is a good way to balance the general riskiness of long-term bonds against short-term bonds’ specific vulnerability to a Fed rate hike this year.

3. The economy could slow down

Again, if the U.S. keeps growing, rising interest rates might be appropriate, and helpful in holding inflation and financial speculation in check. But it’s important the Fed gets its timing right, or a rate hike could stall the recovery—or even put it in reverse.

That’s what happened in Sweden, where the nation’s central bank trashed what was a promising recovery by pulling the trigger too soon. Like the U.S. Federal Reserve, Sweden’s Riksbank lowered rates during the recession in order to spur economic growth. Once that growth arrived in 2011, bankers decided to begin raising rates in order to thwart a real estate bubble. Soon after, hiring began to fall, deflation hit, and Sweden’s magic recovery was over. The country has yet to return to its 2011 level of growth.

In deciding when to get rates back to normal, that’s the scenario Yellen is trying to avoid.

MONEY stocks

Are International Stocks Still Worth the Risk?

As the Eurozone continues to face the Greek economic crisis and slow growth overall for the continent, many investors are wondering if buying international stocks is worth the risk.

MONEY Oscars

Patricia Arquette Wants You to Get a Raise — Here’s How to Make It Happen

The Oscar winner gave a shout-out to American women—and called for fair pay regardless of sex.

An exciting moment for many Oscar viewers on Sunday was Patricia Arquette’s Best Supporting Actress acceptance speech for her role as the protagonist’s mother in the film Boyhood.

“To every woman who gave birth, to every taxpayer and citizen of this nation, we have fought for everybody else’s equal rights,” Arquette said. “It is our time to have wage equality once and for all, and equal rights for women in the United States of America!”

Those words, which drew cheers from fellow actresses Meryl Streep and Jennifer Lopez, reflect growing tensions in Hollywood over the way women in the industry are represented and compensated. Not only do actresses have fewer roles available to them than men—only 30% of speaking characters—but they are paid less across the board. Even Academy Award-winning women face a huge pay gap: They get an extra $500,000 on average tacked on to their salary after winning an Oscar, compared with a $3.9 million bump for men.

Of course, pay discrimination is not limited to La-La Land. Women still make only 78¢ for every dollar a man makes, the Census reports, and that’s true across all wage levels, for everyone from truck drivers to top executives.

If you’re frustrated by your salary (or the pay earned by a woman in your life) and Arquette’s words resonated with you, here are some ways to change things right now.

1. Talk to a man whose job you want

A recent study found that women tend to express satisfaction with low pay because they compare themselves with female peers, and therefore never get a full picture of how underpaid they are relative to men.

Finding a male mentor in a position a notch or three above you can be a huge asset for many reasons, but one of the biggest is that he can give you an unbiased idea of what salary you should be asking for when you seek a promotion or new job.

2. Don’t say “yes” without making a counteroffer

Whether because of social expectations or a hesitation to appear too aggressive (a fear that is not unfounded given proven workplace biases), women are less likely to negotiate than men. One study revealed that only 31% of women countered the salary offer for their first job after grad school, versus 50% of men.

When you are asking for a raise or naming your salary expectations for a new job, it helps to come prepared. You’ll want to be ready with a clear description of your successes and how you have added value in your current position. And you should have an exact dollar figure in mind; research shows negotiating with a specific number makes you sound more authoritative than using a ballpark one.

If you get a resounding “no,” don’t just give up: Consider asking for a one-time bonus instead.

3. Become a mentor

It’s obvious advice to seek out strong mentors to get ahead at work. But taking subordinates under your wing can be just as effective for increasing your status.

Wharton professor Adam Grant has shown that women and men alike tend to be most successful when they balance both giving and taking at work. And women in particular can get a leg up as negotiators when they are in a mentor position, Grant found.

When the higher ups see you as a person who gives a lot and supports the people around you, it’s easier for you to take a little back—in the form of higher pay.

 

MONEY Markets

What the Greek Crisis Means for Your Money

Global markets seem safe enough for now, but a so-called “Grexit” could have unpredictable effects.

As government officials in Greece and the rest of the European Union continue to haggle over the terms of its bailout agreement, you may be wondering: Does this have anything to do with me?

If you are investing in a retirement account like a 401(k) or an IRA, the answer is likely “yes.” About a third of holdings in a fairly typical target-date mutual fund, like Vanguard Target Retirement 2035, are in foreign stocks. Funds like this, which hold a mix of stocks and bonds, are popular choices in 401(k)s.

Of those foreign stocks, only a small number are Greek companies. Vanguard Total International Stock (which the 2035 fund holds), for example, has only about 0.1% of assets in Greek companies. But about 20% of the foreign holdings in a typical target date fund are in euro-member countries, and if Greece leaves the euro, that could affect the whole continent.

What’s the worst that could happen? For one, investors and citizens in some troubled economies like Spain and Italy could start pulling their euros out of banks. Also, borrowing costs could go up, and that could hurt economic growth and weigh down stock prices. And if fear of European instability drives investors to seek out safe assets like U.S. Treasuries, then bond yields and interest rates could keep staying at their unusually low levels.

There are some market watchers who see a potential upside to the conflict over Greece, however.

“If you believe the euro is an average of its currencies, it could actually rise if Greece leaves,” says BMO Private Bank chief investment officer Jack Ablin. A higher euro would make European stocks more valuable in dollar terms.

Additionally, he says, if Athens is thrown into pandemonium, then it’s actually less likely other countries will want to follow Greece out of the currency union.

The Greek situation will also have an impact on the bond market. If fear of European instability drives investors to seek out safe assets like U.S. Treasuries, then many bond funds will do well, and yields and interest rates would stay at their unusually low levels.

Perhaps the most insidious thing right now, says Ablin, is uncertainty. Again, a Greek exit from the euro would be unprecedented, and that makes the effect unpredictable—and potentially very scary for the global market. So investors would be wise to keep in mind the possibility of “black swans,” a term coined by statistician Nassim Taleb to describe market events that seem unimaginable (like black swans used to be) until they actually occur.

MONEY Health Care

Why You’re Still Paying for Birth Control Even Though It’s “Free” Now

150211_FF_BirthControl
Laura Johansen—Getty Images

Most women with private health insurance can get contraception for free, but a lack of information means some are still paying out of pocket—even when they shouldn't be.

A record scratch sounded in my head one weeknight this January, when a pharmacist at my local drugstore told me my birth control pills would—for the first time—cost more than $50 a month.

Strange, I thought, since I could have sworn I heard contraception was one of the preventive health services that are free under the Affordable Care Act, and that the law was rapidly expanding access for most women, with at least 67% of insured women on the pill paying $0 (up from only 15% in 2012), according to a recent study by the Guttmacher Institute. Perplexing.

After all, I don’t work for an exempted religious organization or a company such as Hobby Lobby, which in a Supreme Court case last year won the right to deny contraceptive coverage because of conflicting beliefs. And the same pills—Ortho Tri-cyclen Lo—cost me nothing under my old health plan. Sure, I had switched insurance companies in the new year (to Aetna, the third largest in the country), but I’d opted for a high-premium Gold plan. A monthly copay on par with the cost of an iPod shuffle seemed hefty and unfair.

So I left the pharmacy empty handed and went home to call Aetna.

My happiness was brief when a customer service agent informed me that—while most brand-name pills had a copay—I could simply switch to a free generic version of the same compound. The problem? Turns out there is no generic version of Ortho Tri-cyclen Lo yet. So I was trapped, much like women whose insurance companies have denied them coverage for the NuvaRing, reasoning that they can take generic pills with the same hormones—even though the Department of Health and Human Services has been clear that the ring is a distinct form of contraception (and should therefore be free).

I hesitated to simply choose a different generic for a reason that should not surprise the many other women who have tried multiple birth control methods: Switching from pill to pill in the past caused me side effects, which thankfully subsided once I finally found one that worked for me.

“People respond differently to different pills and a change can cause side effects like irregular bleeding and headaches,” says Jill Rabin, an ob-gyn and professor at Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine. “There’s no predicting how someone will do unless they try it.”

The pressure I felt to switch seemed especially unjust given this aspect of the law: While women can be charged a copay for brand name drugs when an equivalent generic is available, this Department of Labor FAQ explains, “if, however, a generic version is not available, or would not be medically appropriate for the patient” as determined by her doctor, “then a plan or issuer must provide coverage for the brand name drug … without cost-sharing.”

When I brought my dilemma (and the fact that I was a journalist planning to write about it) to Aetna’s director of communications, Susan Millerick, she took swift action. Within a week, I had my Ortho Tri-cyclen Lo, free of copay.

“It is always Aetna’s intent to abide by the laws that govern our health benefits coverage, and to fairly interpret and apply all laws and regulatory guidance on behalf of our customers and members,” Millerick wrote in an email.

Millerick’s explanation for what had happened suggests any woman would be wise to question any insurer denial for contraceptive; she said Aetna’s “service reps erred” in not telling me about the option to appeal the copay. I should have been told that I could just ask my doctor to call and verify that I really needed my pill and that a different generic would not suffice.

The good news for many women is that simply being informed of your options—and getting your doctor on your side—may be enough to go from paying a wallet-draining copay to nothing at all, says Rabin.

“Figuring out the best contraception that minimizes cost and maximizes efficacy is a conversation that should be between doctor and patient,” Rabin says. “Most doctors don’t want that decision taken out of their hands and would be happy to help make that call for their patients.”

For those women who encounter more resistance than I did—or find, as Kaiser Health News reported, that certain insurers are even trying to wriggle out of covering generics—there are other resources to turn to, like the National Women’s Law Center. Their website has clear instructions on how to fight back if you think your insurer is unfairly denying you free birth control, with templates for appeal letters and a free hotline (866-745-5487) for additional assistance.

Even with all the progress, thousands of women have been contacting the NWLC’s hotline in recent months after running into problems getting free contraceptives, says Mara Gandal-Powers, a lawyer at the NWLC.

Generally, the biggest obstacle to free birth control access right now is ignorance, she says. Many women—and their insurance representatives, doctors, and pharmacists—aren’t on the same page about whether their particular contraception should have a copay or not. Instead of doing a double take at the cost of their contraceptives, Gandal-Powers says, some women never question the charge.

That’s a compelling reason to double check your insurer, pharmacist, and even doctor’s assumptions.

“There is definitely a lot of education that still needs to happen,” says Gandal-Powers, “not just among women themselves but also among health care providers and pharmacists.”

Beyond a lack of education, a few more obstacles to universally free birth control remain. Besides the religious exemption, there’s also a subset of insurance plans that are “grandfathered” in such a way that they don’t have to cover contraception right away—though they will in coming years. Enrollment in grandfathered plans is dropping, with only 26% of covered workers enrolled in a grandfathered health plan in 2014, down from 56% in 2011, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. Another exception is self-funded student plans.

The takeaway? If you’re paying more than $0 for birth control, it can’t hurt to do a little digging. If you are lucky (and persistent), you could end up pushing your insurer to better comply with the law—and save hundreds of dollars a year, to boot.

MONEY

The 5 Funniest ‘Saturday Night Live’ Skits About Money

SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE: WEEKEND UPDATE THURSDAY, (from left): Amy Poehler, Seth Meyers, Kenan Thompson, (Episode 101, aired Oct. 9, 2008), 2008.
Dana Edelson—©NBC/Courtesy Everett Collectio

As the NBC comedy show celebrates 40 seasons on the air, here are MONEY's picks for the best sketches making light of awkward bank ads, the financial crisis, and more.

Over the course of a four-decade run, Saturday Night Live has taken aim at most of the trappings of American financial life—even the things you wouldn’t think were funny, like stock market crashes and consumer debt. In honor of the show’s star-studded anniversary celebration this Sunday, here are MONEY’s favorite SNL sketches about money, spanning nearly all of its 40 years.

1. Fix It! (Parts One and Two)

In these two Weekend Update segments, Kenan Thompson plays Oscar Rogers, a “financial expert” who describes a path out of the 2008 financial crisis.

Best line: “Fix it! It’s a simple three-step process. Step one: Fix! Step two: It! Step three: Fix it! Then repeat steps one through three until it’s all been fixed!”

 

 

In that one phrase, Thompson gives voice to the powerlessness and frustration felt by laid-off workers and pummeled investors worldwide. (We wonder what John Belushi’s samurai stockbroker would have to say about that.)

2. First CitiWide Change Bank

This 1988 commercial parody—featuring Jan Hooks, Kevin Nealon, and Jim Downey—highlights just how unimpressive financial services can be, in an ad for a bank that brags about offering change to customers. And they don’t mean it in the Obama way.

 

Best line: “We are not going to give you change that you don’t want. If you come to us with a hundred-dollar bill, we’re not going to give you two thousand nickels—unless that meets your particular change needs.”

Joking about how weak bank services are would be funnier if it weren’t so true.

3. “Don’t Buy Stuff You Cannot Afford”

Steve Martin and Amy Poehler play a couple in need of a budgeting intervention in this 2006 skit, featuring Chris Parnell as the author of a, shall we say, intuitively titled book about how to control spending.

Best lines:

Parnell: The advice is priceless and the book is free.”
Poehler: “Well, I like the sound of that.”
Martin: “Yeah, we can put it on our credit card!”

If only getting out of debt were as simple as the skit suggests; in reality, paying off loans and gaining financial stability can be hard no matter how smart or hardworking you are. But we’d still pony up for a copy of Stop Buying Stuff magazine.

4. Consumer Probe: Irwin Mainway

This 1976 classic features Candice Bergen as a reporter and Dan Aykroyd as the sunglass-sporting Irwin Mainway, purveyor of such children’s toys as Johnny Switchblade, Mr. Skin Grafter, Doggie Dentist, and Bag o’ Glass.

 

Best lines:

Bergen: “I just don’t understand why you can’t make harmless toys like these wooden alphabet blocks.”
Aykroyd: “You call this harmless? I got a sliver!”

5. Metrocard

Roseanne Barr plays a 24-hour hotline representative for the fictional “Metrocard” credit card in this 1991 sketch, which sends up confessional-style TV ads highlighting service. Phil Hartman plays a seemingly satisfied customer.

Best lines:

Barr: “And then he gets really mad and tells me I’m supposed to help him! You know, like I’m his mom or something. So I say, ‘Why don’t you call home and have somebody wire you the money? Or call your company and tell them the problem? Or, better yet, why don’t you take a personal check out of your checkbook, roll it up real tight, and then cram it!'”

Hartman: “She gave me several options.”

MONEY Jon Stewart

3 Ways to Be More Like Jon Stewart

The comedian demonstrates how to execute a job departure at the top of your game.

As you’ve probably heard, Jon Stewart, the beloved host of Comedy Central’s “Daily Show,” announced this week that he’ll soon leave the show after 17 years.

It seems clear from his own words—and the desperation of his employer to find a bankable replacement—that Stewart is departing of his own accord and on his own terms. And yet, unlike his former acolyte and fellow late-night star Stephen Colbert (who will take over David Letterman’s chair on CBS in the fall), Stewart will apparently leave his perch without a planned landing.

His reasons? “I don’t know that there will ever be anything that I will ever be as well suited for as this show,” he told NPR’s Terry Gross last year. “That being said, I think there are moments when you realize that that’s not enough anymore, or that maybe it’s time for some discomfort.”

It’s a sentiment that many of us can identify with, even if directing feature films or a future in national politics aren’t likely to figure into our own second acts. The fact is, countless mid- and late-career professionals feel restless in their jobs, find that they have nowhere left to go at their organizations, or simply feel burned out.

Whether or not that description fits you, there’s a great deal that almost anyone can learn from the funnyman’s gracefully planned exit.

1. Know when it’s time to say goodbye

Do you constantly complain about work? Do your achievements go unrecognized? Do you end each week frustrated and dread Mondays? Do you see no professional path ahead? “Yes” answers to any or all of these are probably a good sign that you may have gotten all you can out of your job and it’s time to consider other professional options, because chances are those feelings are having a negative impact on your work.

By most accounts, Stewart is still at or near the top of his game; according to the Wall Street Journal, “The Daily Show” was number one among younger viewers by a wide margin as recently as last season. Follow his example and recognize your lack of focus before your audience, your boss, or your subordinates do.

“You have to choose the right moment,” says career coach Roy Cohen. “Ideally it’s when the stars seem to align, whether that’s the company offering a buyout or right after you have wound down a successful project.”

That way you’ll be able to go out on your own timetable, with financial stability, and heading in your desired direction.

2. Lay the groundwork for your second act before ending your first

Stewart isn’t leaving “The Daily Show” on a whim. He took a three-month break during summer 2013 to direct Rosewater, a critically acclaimed film about an Iranian journalist and political prisoner. This sabbatical appears to have given Stewart a chance to do a test-run of life outside his comfort zone, and it certainly proved that he could hold his own doing something very different.

Cohen says doing that kind of thinking ahead of time is key for anyone considering a career move.

“First, engage in an assessment of your biggest goals,” he advises. “Ask yourself honestly: What do I like? What don’t I like? Where have I succeeded? Where have I failed?”

He also advises those considering an exit to start planning early and do a reality check on how long the transition will take. “I’ve had clients who didn’t carefully plan their exit and then felt they had shortchanged themselves in their second acts,” Cohen warns.

For some people, careful planning will mean searching for and landing another job before leaving their current one. (Call it the Stephen Colbert approach.) For others, it’s taking classes that will expand your skill set, or just saving up enough money to give yourself the time to figure things out and set off in the next direction.

Or there might be an in-between approach that involves a part-time or consulting arrangement to help your former employer through the transition—and sustain your bank account—while also carving out enough time to get a fresh degree or otherwise establishing your bona fides in a new field.

3. Make your people into stars

Stephen Colbert, Steve Carell, John Oliver, and Ed Helms are just a few of the once-obscure, now well-known comics that Jon Stewart helped launch and move onto bigger things. You can be sure they’ll ardently support him in any next endeavor, and probably spend a good deal of social, political, or financial capital to do so.

Of course, mentoring and otherwise helping others advance their careers is part of the job description of most managers. But taking this role seriously can have reciprocal benefits down the road when it’s time to explore new professional avenues.

If you’ve been generous with your time, accolades, and connections, your former employees will likely do the same when you are looking to start your next chapter. They’ll become an active network of supporters, able to bridge you into new industries and professional communities; clue you in on and recommend you for exciting opportunities; and may even give you your next dream job.

MONEY Taylor Swift

You’ll Never Guess What Taylor Swift Wanted to Be When She Grew Up

150209_INV_Taylor_1
Kevin Mazur/WireImage

Hint: It wasn't an entertainer.

Pop musician and gazillionaire Taylor Swift is no stranger to business strategy.

In recent months the self-professed “nightmare dressed as a daydream” has flexed her guns by spurning streaming music giant Spotify, investing in a $20 million New York apartment, and applying to trademark phrases like “Nice to Meet You. Where You Been?” for use on future commercial endeavors.

So where did the 25 year old get her financial savvy? One clue comes from an interview she taped for YouTube back in 2011, where she discusses her relationship with her stockbroker father, Scott Swift. The singer says her dad has been telling her to save money and invest in utilities since she was a child.

“My dad is so passionate about what he does in the way that I’m passionate about music,” Swift says in the video. “This guy lives for being a stockbroker… And anybody who talks to him, like, he’ll talk about me for the first five minutes, and then it’s, like, ‘Say, what are you investing in?'”

Swift goes on to explain that at the age of eight, while other students at school said they aspired to be astronauts and ballerinas, she wanted to be a financial adviser when she grew up.

“I love my dad so much, because he’s so gung-ho for his job, and I just saw how happy it made him, and I just thought, I can broke stocks,” she said.

If that line makes you roll your eyes, remember, as a wise person once said, “haters gonna hate, hate, hate, hate, hate.”

 

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