TIME Israel

FAA Extends Israel Flight Ban Another 24 Hours

Cancelled fights shown on a departure board in Ben Gurion Airport in Lod, just outside Tel Aviv, Israel on July 23, 2014.
Cancelled fights shown on a departure board in Ben Gurion Airport in Lod, just outside Tel Aviv, Israel on July 23, 2014. Jim Hollander—EPA

The FAA renewed its flight ban a day after a rocket struck near Tel Aviv's airport

The Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday extended its ban prohibiting U.S. airlines from flying to and from Israel’s main airport for another 24 hours. The renewed ban comes amid escalating violence between Israel and Islamist groups in the Gaza Strip, particularly Hamas.

The announcement came a day after a rocket launched from the Gaza Strip struck about a mile from Tel Aviv’s Ben Gurion International Airport. In response to the rocket attack, the FAA stopped all U.S. air travel in and out of the city. Just hours before the announcement, Delta Airlines and United Airlines said they were voluntarily and indefinitely suspending Israel flights. Several major European air carriers, over which the FAA holds no authority, have also voluntarily stopped flying to Israel.

“Due to the potentially hazardous situation created by the armed conflict in Israel and Gaza, all flight operations to/from Ben Gurion International Airport (llbg) by U.S. operators are prohibited for up to 24 hours,” the FAA said Wednesday in its renewed ban.

The FAA’s renewal of the ban came despite Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s plea to U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry that the FAA reverse it. The State Department said Tuesday it was not involved in the FAA’s decision to implement the ban.

The U.S. State Department issued travel warnings for Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip Monday.

Zeke J. Miller contributed reporting.

TIME Security

Here’s How Hackers Stole Over $1 Million From 1,600 StubHub Users

U.S. law enforcement charged 6 Russians and Americans who were allegedly part of a far-flung international hacking scheme

Six individuals in Russia and the United States have been charged with taking part in a broad international hacking scheme that attacked over 1,600 StubHub users’ accounts and fraudulently purchased more than $1 million in tickets.

In March 2013, StubHub discovered that more than 1,000 of its users’ accounts were compromised by hackers who were fraudulently purchasing thousands of tickets using the service. The tickets included Justin Timberlake concerts, expensive seats at Yankee Stadium behind the dugout, orchestra seats and sold-out Broadway shows. The tickets were worth over $1 million in total, law enforcement officials said.

StubHub told law enforcement officials of the breach, prompting a multi-national investigation into the hacking ring. Two Americans have been arrested and a third is expected to turn himself in over the coming days. Police are awaiting the extradition of a Russian national in Spain.

“Today’s law enforcement action reflect the increasingly global landscape in which financial and cybercriminals operate,” said Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance, Jr. on Wednesday. “Financial crime is no longer local.”

Vadim Polyakov, the Russian national currently being held in Spain, allegedly hacked StubHub accounts to purchase more than 3,500 tickets. Police say Polyakov sent the tickets to three American fences, who resold them and laundered the profits through Russian nationals and others in London and Toronto.

Police say Gmail chats between two of the Americas, Daniel Petryszyn told Laurence Brinkmeyer, show the Americans knew the tickets had been stolen. “ … This guy [Polyakov] is pretty much admitting he is a hacker,” wrote Petryszyn. “I don’t give a f*** I will launder all the money they want.”

The Americans sent the ticket proceeds to bank accounts controlled by Polyakov and other individuals around the world.

During the months-long international investigation, law enforcement officials scoured the ticket purchases of over 1,000 fraudulent ticket sales, identified them with PayPal accounts and used search warrants to track associated email addresses.

One officer with knowledge of Russian used Facebook messages to discover that Polyakov was taking a vacation in Spain. On July 3rd, Polaykov was tracked to a hotel to a hotel in Barcelona, where Spanish authorities and the U.S. Secret Service arrested him.

StubHub said that customers were refunded for unauthorized transactions, and that customers were assisted in changing their passwords.

The hackers obtained customers’ logins through other sources, StubHub said, not by hacking StubHub’s systems.

“Customer accounts were accessed by cyber criminals who had obtained the customers’ valid login and password either through data breaches of other businesses, or through the use of key-loggers and/or other malware on the customers’ PC,” StubHub said in a statement.

Vance said it was unclear how the hackers originally obtained users’ names and passwords, but the transaction records show there may be others involved in the hacking scheme.

“With cybercrime, it’s very hard to say you’ve got it boxed up entirely,” Vance said. “We’ve got the core actors, though many more may follow elsewhere.”

TIME cities

These Are the 10 Unhappiest Cities in America

N.Y.Yankees vs Toronto Blue Jays at Yankee Stadium., Yankee
N.Y.Yankees vs Toronto Blue Jays at Yankee Stadium., Yankee fans are unhappy and concerned as they lose another game and the hopes of a post-season slip away. New York Daily News Archive—NY Daily News via Getty Images

America's got some unhappy cities. Here are the worst ones

It’s no surprise that residents of cities on the decline like Detroit and Indianapolis are some of the unhappiest people in the country. Researchers at the University of British Columbia and Harvard University found that happiness in cities is greater when a city is growing—and one thing that America’s old rust belt cities don’t have is newcomers eager to move in. But the city that tops the list as the most unhappy in America is no bankrupt old steel mill town — It’s New York City.

By using data gathered from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the research team found that New York is the most miserable American city with over 1 million people, despite its denizens being among the highest paid in the country. As the researchers put it, people who live in unhappier cities actually receive higher wages, “presumably as compensation for their misery.”

What about the happiest cities? Well, the Richmond-Petersburg metropolitan area in Virginia ranked as the happiest in the country with over 1 million residents, and many of the most joyful cities appear to be scattered about the south in sunnier climes.

The researchers said in the paper that they couldn’t verify a lot of patterns previous studies have established—that unhappiness is related to income inequality, that weather has a direct improvement on happiness—but they did say that happiness is not necessarily the most important factor for choosing a city to live in.

“Our research indicates that people care about more than happiness alone, so other factors may encourage them to stay in a city despite their unhappiness,” says Gottlieb. “This means that researchers and policy-makers should not consider an increase in reported happiness as an overriding objective.”

Here’s the rest of the rankings, in list form. The data researchers used was all self-reported, so it’s not a definitive measure of people’s well-being. But it does shed light on city dwellers’ perception of their own lives.

Top 10 happiest metropolitan areas with a population greater than 1 million (as of 2010):

1. Richmond-Petersburg, VA
2. Norfolk-Virginia Beach-Newport News, VA
3. Washington, DC
4. Raleigh-Durham, NC
5. Atlanta, GA
6. Houston, TX
7. Jacksonville, FL
8. Nashville, TN
9. West Palm Beach-Boca Raton, FL
10. Middlesex-Somerset-Hunterdon, NJ

Top 10 unhappiest metropolitan areas with a population greater than 1 million (as of 2010):

1. New York, NY
2. Pittsburgh, PA
3. Louisville, KY
4. Milwaukee, WI
5. Detroit, MI
6. Indianapolis, IN
7. St. Louis, MO
8. Las Vegas, NV
9. Buffalo, NY
10. Philadelphia, PA

U.S. metropolitan areas with the highest reported happiness:

1. Charlottesville, VA
2. Rochester, MN
3. Lafayette, LA
4. Naples, FL
5. Baton Rouge, LA
6. Flagstaff, AZ
7. Shreveport, LA
8. Houma, LA
9. Corpus Christi, TX
10. Provo, UT

TIME Drugs

Oregon Voters to Decide on Pot Legalization in November

140708_EM_LegalWeed_2
Bob Leeds, co-owner of Sea of Green Farms, shows some of the marijuana he produces during a tour of his company's facility in Seattle on June 30, 2014. Jason Redmond—Reuters

Oregon could become the third state to legalize recreational weed

Oregon voters will vote in November on whether they will live in the third state to legalize recreational marijuana for people 21 or older.

The Oregon Secretary of State certified a petition Tuesday for the Control, Regulation, and Taxation of Marijuana and Industrial Hemp Act, confirming it had enough signatures to land on the November ballot, according to the New Approach Oregon campaign, a group advocating for the law.

“This is our moment to be part of history and lead a movement,” Dominique Lopez, an organizer at New Approach Oregon, said in a statement. “Treating marijuana use as a crime has failed, but together we can win a more sensible approach and better the lives of Oregonians.”

The proposal would allow individuals to possess up to eight ounces of marijuana at home and cultivate up to four plants. It would require recreational marijuana to be taxed at $1.50 a gram and $35 an ounce. That income would be used for schools, law enforcement and drug treatment programs.

Oregonians opposed a poorly-funded and less organized legal recreational cannabis initiative in 2012, 55-45%, the Statesman Journal reports, but New Approach Oregon says it has learned from those mistakes.

Colorado and Washington were the first states to legalize recreational marijuana use.

TIME Nigeria

Boko Haram Displaces 15,000 Nigerians After Civilian Massacre

The Islamic insurgency slaughtered dozens of civilians and has taken control of a strategic area in Nigeria

The insurgent Islamist group Boko Haram raided an army base in northeast Nigeria and massacred around 50 civilians in nearby villages over the weekend, filling a power vacuum in the region after the evacuation of Nigerian troops.

Recent attacks on villages in the region have killed 50 civilians and driven out 15,000 people, Reuters reports, further evidence that international efforts to tackle the Islamist group after its kidnapping of 200 girls earlier this year has failed to curb its violent activities.

The group now can move freely in a region with a major highway linking the northern and southern districts of Borno, bordering Cameroon, Chad and Niger.

Boko Haram is pursing a scorched earth policy, security sources tell Reuters, driving out authorities who do not support their effort to create an Islamic state.

The five-year old insurgent group achieved global notoriety in April when its fighters kidnapped more than 200 girls from a school in the northeastern village of Chibok in April. So far, Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan has been unable to retrieve them.

[Reuters]

TIME Television

Jon Stewart Launches $10 Billion Kickstarter to Buy CNN

Jon Stewart speaks during a taping of "The Daily Show with John Stewart," in New York. in 2012.
Jon Stewart speaks during a taping of "The Daily Show with John Stewart," in New York. in 2012. Carolyn Kaster—AP

Jon Stewart doesn't like the cable news channel and wants to make it better—but he'll need some help raising the funds to buy it

If Rupert Murdoch buys Time Warner, the world’s other great media titan will be there to pick up the scraps.

Jon Stewart said Tuesday on the Daily Show that he is launching a $10 billion Kickstarter campaign to buy CNN. The legacy news station, whose value is reportedly around $10 billion and is a Time Warner company, would likely be up for sale if Rupert Murdoch were successful in his bid to acquire the media conglomerate.

Ten billion dollars?

“It’s a lot of money for anyone,” said Stewart on Tuesday. “But not a lot of money for everyone.

So that’s where the Daily Show host’s campaign comes in. Stewart’s LetsBuyCNN.com mimics a Kickstarter page, though it doesn’t actually allow users to contribute money toward the goal. Hypothetically, a contribution of $1 billion would allow you to host a CNN anchor Hunger Games-style fight to the death.

Worth it? Depends on whether you dislike CNN as much as the Daily Show does.

“CNN, America’s first 24-hour cable news network, has been terrible for many, many years,” LetsBuyCNN.com reads. “Does it have to be that way? Who knows, maybe it does. So let’s find out for ourselves!”

Amen?

TIME Courts

Penn State Ex-Coaches Sue University for $1 Million Over Dismissal

Jay Paterno, son of former Penn State football head coach Joe Paterno, speaks during a memorial service for his father in State College, Pa., in 2012.
Jay Paterno, son of former Penn State football head coach Joe Paterno, speaks during a memorial service for his father in State College, Pa., in 2012. Gene J. Puskar—AP

One is the son of former head coach Joe Paterno

Two former assistant football coaches at Penn State, including the son of the late head coach Joe Paterno, have filed a lawsuit seeking $1 million in damages from the university, claiming they were unfairly linked to the Jerry Sandusky child molestation scandal.

Jay Paterno and Bill Kenney, the two plaintiffs in the suit, were fired in the aftermath of the Sandusky affair when the new head coach Bill O’Brien signed on. Sandusky was sentenced to between 30 and 60 years in prison in 2012, after being convicted of child molestation and abuse charges.

Paterno and Kenney argue in the lawsuit that their dismissal was baseless, CNN reports. Since their dismissal in January 2012, they “have been denied lucrative employment opportunities based upon the false light and association by innuendo,” the lawsuit claims.

The two are seeking $1 million in compensation from Penn State for damages to their reputation and inability to meaningfully provide for themselves. They also want Penn State to issue a statement absolving them of any connection with Sandusky.

Penn State said in a statement Tuesday “it is common practice for incoming head coaches to select their own coaching staff,” PennLive.com reports.

Jay Paterno’s father, Joe Paterno, was the head coach of the Penn State team for much of the period that Sandusky served as assistant coach. Paterno Sr. was fired in November 2011 and died just over 2 months later.

[CNN]

TIME Fast Food

CMO: Chipotle’s Successful Because It’s Been ‘Very Consistent’

Inside A Chipotle Restaurant Ahead of Earnings Figures
Employees prepare lunch orders at a Chipotle Mexican Grill restaurant at Madison Square Park in New York, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014. Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

TIME spoke with Chipotle's chief marketing officer, Mark Crumpacker, about why Chipotle is wrapping up the competition

Chipotle, the food industry’s fastest-rising star, reported earnings Monday that far exceeded Wall Street’s expectations. Despite higher menu prices because of some food supply shortages, Chipotle’s burritos (from the bowl-sheathed varieties to the tortilla-ensconced specimens) and tacos (soft and hard) are flying off the counters. The company’s sales at locations open for at least a year bounced up 17 percent over the last year, an enviable figure for any restaurant. The company’s stock rose 12 percent on Tuesday with the announcement that in three months alone, Chipotle had revenues of over $1 billion. And Chipotle predicted it will open between 180 and 195 stores in 2014. (That’s at least one every 48 hours.)

Founded in 1993 with the opening of its first store in Denver, Colorado, Chipotle was one of the first chain restaurants to move to using naturally raised animals, which meant securing a meat supply that wasn’t — and still isn’t — fed hormones and antibiotics. It got an early boost from McDonald’s, which divested its assets in 2006 when Chipotle went public. Chipotle started serving naturally-raised pork in 2000 and naturally-raised chicken 2002 and continues to refine its food supply.

To find out more about what is making Chipotle so hot, we talked to the company’s chief marketing officer and right-hand man to CEO Steve Ells, Mark Crumpacker.

TIME: I have to ask, because it’s a question I ask myself whenever I go to Chipotle: When is the guacamole going to be free?

Mark Crumpacker: [Laughs] When it costs less than steak. Guacamole is incredibly expensive. I wish it were free because people love it. I think more than half of our orders include guacamole in one form or another.

T: Chipotle raised its menu prices this year, but in-store sales still increased 17 percent. Why are people so into Chipotle despite higher prices?

MC: I wish there were a super-simple answer for it. We haven’t changed a lot about what we’re doing. We’ve been very consistent with what we’ve done over the years. Chipotle doesn’t play the typical marketing game where we add new menu items and try to get people in with gimmicks like that. So I don’t think we’ve changed so much as consumer demand has changed. I have to wonder if maybe consumers aren’t catching up with us, in a way. Frankly, we’re just really positioned well to be where those folks want to go.

T: What are foodies demanding these days, and how does that line up with what Chipotle cooks?

MC: We see a trend toward people wanting higher-quality food. And it comes in a number of different flavors. Some people are interested in health, other people are interested in the impact of the food they eat on the environment. Generally speaking, across most of the different age segments we look at, we’ve seen an increase in people’s propensity to do that. If you’re going to do that, if you’re going to care a little bit more about where your food comes from, and you’re going to eat fast food, your choice is going to get limited pretty fast. There’s not a lot you can do, and Chipotle is quite well-known for having higher quality ingredients.

T: Who does Chipotle compete with? Do you compete with non-chain, mom and pop restaurants, or Taco Bell?

MC: A lot of people talk about doing the things we’re doing, but I don’t think there’s a competitor our scale that’s doing what we’re doing with regards to spending more on our ingredients. Our food costs are just higher than the other guys’ are. We’re spending more on them and there aren’t processed menu items. We do a lot of the cooking by hand in the restaurant. There’s not a lot of that going on [with other chains].

Having said that, we compete with everybody. Our customers definitely go to McDonald’s, some of them go to Taco Bell, they go to a lot of different restaurants.

T: McDonald’s was an early investor and divested its assets in 2006. In what ways did Chipotle overlap with McDonald’s, and then how have the two companies now become different entities?

MC: The companies were always very different entities. McDonald’s had a very hands-off relationship with Chipotle. They provided support where we wanted it and that was largely on real estate, logistics, supply chain issues initially. But it quickly become apparent that we were essentially heading in a different direction and there was really no influence on the food side in the experience we created in our restaurant.

T: Do you have a favorite menu item?

MC: I’m partial to the carnitas. In fact, I snuck out of a meeting today and had that. I visit all these farms and know where all the ingredients come from and that’s the one I’m most proud of. It’s delicious.

Of all the proteins we serve, the difference between commodity pork and naturally-raised pork is the most dramatic. If you’ve ever been to a confinement hog operation, it is absolutely terrifying. It’s brutal, it’s unpleasant for the animals and the people working there. And the difference between that and our hogs which are raised, even if they’re not totally outdoors‚ and just deeply bedded pens, is really, really dramatic. The alternative is very grim.

T: So it feels good to eat it, then?

MC: Yeah. I think if you’re going to eat meat, that’s a pretty good one to eat. Having been to the farms and seen all the animals, I feel best about that one.

T: Does Chipotle’s growth have something to do with the rise in popularity of Mexican cuisine? Would this have been possible 30 years ago?

MC: When Chipotle started 21 years ago, Mexican food in the United States was very, very different. It was a large plate with multiple items, usually something doused in red or green chili sauce and refried beans. Chipotle introduced to the masses the San Francisco-style burrito, which even frankly those San Francisco burritos were smothered in chili sauce. So I wonder how much it’s people more interested in Mexican food, as it is Chipotle introduced them to a different kind of cuisine altogether.

T: What is the most number of times you’ve eaten at Chipotle in one week?

MC: This is probably going to be embarrassing. I’d say five times. I’ve never eaten there every single day. But you know, if you work there and you’re in the restaurant, that’s what you’re going to eat. I know our crews eat our food every day.

T: Any complaints about getting sick of it?

MC: [Laughs] Well, you know, one of the things I learned about Chipotle, which fascinated me when I first started, you need to be very careful about what you order the first time at Chipotle because most people eat that same thing for like, the next decade.

T: What’s Chipotle going to be doing differently five years from now?

MC: Our menu has stayed the same, but underneath that menu we’re constantly striving to improve each individual ingredient. Each one of them is one its own trajectory. If you went through our 25 or so primary ingredients, each one would have a path for some distant goal of where we’d like to go with it. There’s a particular path for chicken, and then for beef and then for pork and all those veggies. We’re almost rid of any ingredients on our menu that are genetically modified. When I look out five years I suspect that the menu will be pretty much the same, but the ingredients underlying will continue to transform as we go.

T: Thanks.

MC: Thank you.

TIME poverty

Here Are the 5 Worst States for a Child’s Well-Being

Children try to do their homework at an evacuation shelter in a high school gymnasium in Kentwood, Louisiana on August 30, 2012.
Children try to do their homework at an evacuation shelter in a high school gymnasium in Kentwood, Louisiana on August 30, 2012. Frederic J. Brown—AFP/Getty Images

Child poverty rates are rising, but some states are better than others when it comes to kids' overall well-being

A new annual report on kids’ well-being finds that child poverty rates are rising across the country, with nearly a quarter of American children living in families below the poverty line.

The KIDS COUNT Data Book released by the Annie E. Casey Foundation shows that poverty rates had dropped from 1990 to 2000, but began increasing again in the early 2000s. Data shows their health and education are improving, with teen birthrates and death rates at all-time lows and more children showing proficiency in reading and math.

But with families still recovering from the recession and fewer resources available from government programs like Medicaid—as well as higher housing and transportation costs—the report finds that kids are growing up in poor households that are having trouble escaping poverty.

Northern states tend to rank better than ones in the South for kids in terms of economic status, education, health and family and community, which the authors of the study attribute to smart investments in children’s health and educational programs. Here are the five states that rank the highest and lowest for kids’ overall well-being:

Lowest

50. Mississippi

49. New Mexico

48. Nevada

47. Louisiana

46. Arizona

Highest

1. Massachusetts

2. Vermont

3. Iowa

4. New Hampshire

5. Minnesota

TIME Health Care

GOP Lawsuit Over Obamacare ‘Loophole’ for Congress Dismissed

Permanent Subcommittee On Investigations Hearing On High Speed Trading
Senator Ronald Johnson, a Republican from Wisconsin, questions witnesses during a Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations hearing in Washington, D.C. on June 17, 2014. Andrew Harrer—Bloomberg/Getty Images

Sen. Ron Johnson's claim related to the law's stipulations for members of Congress and their staffs was tossed out by a federal judge Monday

A Republican senator’s challenge to the part of President Barack Obama’s healthcare law involving members of Congress and their staffs was dismissed Monday by a federal judge.

Sen. Ron Johnson (R—Wisc.) filed the suit related to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provision that members of Congress and their staff may only receive health plans created under the healthcare law, or offered through a online exchange established under the law. The lawsuit claimed that the federal Office of Personnel Management “created a loophole that allowed congressional staff an exemption from the ACA’s provisions,” according to the decision.

The so-called loophole allowed some junior staffers not considered part of the official office of a member of Congress to continue receiving employee benefits, rather than having to buy insurance under the law.

“The Obama administration violated its own signature health care law by giving special treatment to members of Congress and their staffs,” Johnson said in a statement Monday.

U.S. District Judge William Griesbach dismissed the lawsuit on Monday. Griesbach said Senator Johnson failed to show he’d been harmed by the healthcare law, Reuters reports.

The U.S. Supreme Court affirmed in 2012 the law’s “individual mandate” that requires most Americans to buy health insurance or pay a tax penalty.

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