TIME Netherlands

Video: Dutch Police Confront Gunman Who Broke Into TV Studio

Footage from the broadcaster shows the gunman, a young man in a suit and tie, drop his weapon and surrender to police.

An armed man entered the Dutch national broadcaster on Thursday demanding to be put on the air before police restrained him.

No one was hurt in the incident, according to the broadcaster, NOS, which vacated its offices and temporarily stopped broadcasting. The motives of the gunman, a young man a in a suit and tie, are unclear.

Video footage published by NOS shows the gunman saying, according to a Reuters translation, “The things that are going to be said, those are very large world affairs. We were hired by the security service.”

In the clip above from NOG, police demand that the gunman drop his weapon and then put him in handcuffs. No shots are fired.

TIME russia

Russia Says It Would Consider Financial Help for Greece

Russian Federation Council member Anton Siluanov delivers a speech as Russian Federation Council deputy chairman Ilyas Ukhmanov, Russian Federation Council chairperson Valentina Matviyenko, Russian Federation Council deputy chairmen Evgeny Bushmin and Yuri Vorobyov (L to R, background) look on at a plenary meeting of the Russian Federation Council on Jan. 28, 2015.
Russian Federation Council member Anton Siluanov delivers a speech as Russian Federation Council deputy chairman Ilyas Ukhmanov, Russian Federation Council chairperson Valentina Matviyenko, Russian Federation Council deputy chairmen Evgeny Bushmin and Yuri Vorobyov (L to R, background) look on at a plenary meeting of the Russian Federation Council on Jan. 28, 2015. Pitalev Ilya—ITAR-TASS Photo/Corbis

Finance minister says Russia hasn't yet received a request for assistance

Russia’s finance minister said his country would consider providing financial support to Greece, raising the stakes for the European Union as it confronts the new Euroskeptic reality in Athens.

Anton Siluanov told CNBC that Russia has not received a request from Greece for assistance, but his comments come days after the anti-E.U. party Syriza won parliamentary elections, vowing to renegotiate aid packages from the bloc that are tied to strict austerity measures.

“We can imagine any situation, so if such petition is submitted to the Russian government, we will definitely consider it,” he said, “but will take into account all the factors of our bilateral relationships between Russia and Greece, so that is all I can say.”

The Greek government’s clash with the E.U. over its debt risks cutting the country off from euro zone lenders and private investors. That could create an opening for Russia to expand its influence in Greece—an ugly prospect for the E.U. as it engages in a sanctions battle with Russia over the conflict in Ukraine.

E.U. foreign ministers agreed on Thursday to impose a new round of sanctions, according to the Associated Press, apparently overcoming for now concerns from the new Greek government about expanding the rift between the EU and Russia.

[CNBC]

TIME movies

Watch the First Trailer for Ted 2

The bear is back

The next installment of Ted looks like a continuation of the crude jokes and inexplicably heartwarming storyline that made the last film.

The Universal Pictures film, which follows the talking teddy bear’s quest to prove he’s a person in court so that he can father a baby, is slated to come out in June.

Beside Mark Wahlberg and his bud Ted (voiced by director Seth MacFarlane), the sequel also features the likes of Liam Neeson, Amanda Seyfried and Morgan Freeman.

Read next: Mark Wahlberg’s Prosecutor Says He Shouldn’t Be Pardoned For Youth Crime

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME europe

Watch Amal Clooney Eloquently Argue Her Case in Armenian Genocide Hearing

Clooney is representing Armenia before Europe's top human rights court

Amal Clooney laid her case before the European Court of Human Rights on Wednesday against a Turkish politician who denied the 1915 Armenian genocide.

The international human rights lawyer is representing Armenia in a case against Dogu Perincek, the chairman of the Turkish Workers’ Party, who was convicted in Switzerland in 2005 for calling the Armenian genocide an “international lie.”

The Strasbourg-based ECHR later agreed with Perincek that the conviction violated his freedom of expression, and now Switzerland is appealing, with Armenia’s backing as a third party.

“The most important error” made in the earlier ECHR ruling, Clooney said, “is that it cast doubt on the reality of the Armenian genocide that the people suffered 100 years ago.” In her remarks, Clooney noted Turkey’s “disgraceful” record on freedom of expression.

An estimated 1.5 million Armenians were killed by Ottoman Turks in what historians widely consider to be the first genocide of the 20th century, but Turkey has contested the numbers and refused to call it a genocide.

The case could also have wider implications for Europe, where several countries have laws prohibiting public denial of past genocides such as the Holocaust.

Clooney, now arguably the most famous human rights lawyer in the world after marrying actor George Clooney in September, previously represented Greece in its long-running bid to have a collection of classical Greek sculptures returned from the British Museum. She also defended one of three al-Jazeera journalists detained in Egypt.

Read next: Amal Clooney Begins Next Big Human Rights Case

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Music

Tom Petty Has No Hard Feelings About Sam Smith Song

Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers Performs At The Forum
Tom Petty of Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers performs onstage at The Forum on October 10, 2014 in Inglewood, California. Paul R. Giunta—Getty Images

"Sam did the right thing and I have thought no more about this.”

Tom Petty says there is no ill will between him and Sam Smith after the artists reached an agreement announced this week over similarities between a song of his and Smith’s recent hit, Stay With Me.

A representative for Sam Smith announced on Monday that Tom Petty and his co-writer Jeff Lynne would be credited as co-writers on Smith’s song because of similarities between it and Petty’s 1989 hit I Won’t Back Down.

“Not previously familiar with the 1989 Petty/Lynne song, the writers of “Stay With Me” listened to “I Won’t Back Down” and acknowledged the similarity,” the representative said in a statement. “Although the likeness was a complete coincidence, all involved came to an immediate and amicable agreement in which Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne are now credited as co-writers of “Stay With Me” along with Sam Smith, James Napier and William Phillips.”

Now Petty has confirmed that the two artists have reconciled their differences amicably. “Sam did the right thing and I have thought no more about this,” Petty said in a post to his website. “A musical accident no more no less.”

Here’s the full statement:

“About the Sam Smith thing. Let me say I have never had any hard feelings toward Sam. All my years of songwriting have shown me these things can happen. Most times you catch it before it gets out the studio door but in this case it got by. Sam’s people were very understanding of our predicament and we easily came to an agreement. The word lawsuit was never even said and was never my intention. And no more was to be said about it. How it got out to the press is beyond Sam or myself. Sam did the right thing and I have thought no more about this. A musical accident no more no less. In these times we live in this is hardly news. I wish Sam all the best for his ongoing career. Peace and love to all.”

 

Here are the two songs, for you to compare:

 

 

 

TIME Argentina

Murdered Argentine Prosecutor ‘Didn’t Trust His Bodyguards’

Diego Lagomarsino , assistant of late prosecutor Alberto Nisman speaks during a press conference in Buenos Aires, Jan. 28, 2015.
Diego Lagomarsino, assistant of late prosecutor Alberto Nisman speaks during a press conference in Buenos Aires, Jan. 28, 2015. David Fernandez—EPA

Diego Lagomarsino had been in hiding since Alberto Nisman, the prosecutor investigating the deadly 1994 bombing of a Jewish community center, was found dead with a gunshot wound to the head.

The man who lent Argentine prosecutor Alberto Nisman the gun that killed him said Nisman had told him he was afraid for his family’s life.

Diego Lagomarsino said at a news conference on Wednesday that he lent the pistol to Nisman, his employer who was found dead in his apartment on Jan. 18, after the prosecutor told him he did not even trust the bodyguards, Reuters reports.

“At this point, he cracked up, and said: ‘Do you know what it is like for your children not to want to be with you just in case something happens to them?” Lagomarsino said, according to Reuters.

Lagomarsino was charged on Tuesday with illegally lending a weapon that was registered in his name, becoming the only person so far charged in Nisman’s mysterious death, which investigators initially indicated was a suicide while others, including President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, say they believe he was murdered.

Nisman was investigating the 1994 bombing of a Jewish community center in Buenos Aires and was set to testify before Congress the day after he died about his allegations that Fernández covered up Iran’s alleged involvement in the attack.

[Reuters]

TIME movies

Martin Scorcese Set Collapse Kills One

Taiwan Movie Accident
Police inspect a demolished film set where a worker died in an accident at a film lot during preparations for the shooting of a new Martin Scorsese movie titled "Silence," in Taipei, Taiwan, Thursday, Jan. 29. AP—AP

The structure was being fortified for Scorsese’s next film, Silence

One worker died and two others were injured when an old structure under renovation for Martin Scorsese’s next film, “Silence,” collapsed on Thursday in Taiwan.

The workers were fortifying the 83-year-old structure at the Chinese Culture and Movie Center ahead of production for Scorsese’s historical drama, based on the book by Shusaku Endo, about Jesuit priests facing resistance in 17-th century Japan, according to the LA Times.

The film, casting Adam Driver, Andrew Garfield and Liam Neeson, is scheduled for release next year.

Scorsese and other core crewmembers were not at the site at the time of the accident, the LA Times reports.

[LA Times]

TIME South Sudan

South Sudan Militant Group to Release 3,000 Child Soldiers

Child soldiers at Cobra camp in Gumuruk, South Sudan go to a demobilization ceremony. UNICEF

UNICEF calls it "one of the largest ever demobilizations of children."

Nearly three hundred children between ages 11 and 17 laid down their arms Tuesday, in the first step of an ambitious program to reintegrate some 3,000 child soldiers in South Sudan, according to UNICEF.

The children are members of the South Sudan Democratic Army Cobra Faction, a militant group in eastern Sudan whose leader, David Yau Yau, signed a peace agreement with the government last year amid ongoing violence in the country.

UNICEF, which helped broker the children’s release, said it would mark one of the largest demobilization of children soldiers ever. It expects the full handover to take weeks.

“These children have been forced to do and see things no child should ever experience,” UNICEF South Sudan Representative Jonathan Veitch said in a statement.

Since fighting broke out between President Salva Kiir and supporters of Vice President Riek Machar in December 2013, the country—which broke off from Sudan, its northern neighbor, in 2011—has been embroiled in a conflict between the government and rebel groups that has killed more than 10,000 people and displaced some 1.5 million others.

But the conflict has taken a disproportionate toll on children, forcing some 400,000 students out of school and prompting a surge in the number of child soldiers, according to Ettie Higgins, the deputy representative for UNICEF in South Sudan. Since the fighting began, an estimated 12,000 children have been recruited to fight with armed groups on both sides.

Now UNICEF and other organizations, in conjunction with the government, are aiming to return those children to their families.

“They’re happy to give their gun up and they just want to go to school,” Higgins said in a telephone interview from South Sudan after the first group of 280 children were released. “That’s been the key message we’re getting.”

UNICEF and its partner organizations said they will provide counseling and health care to the children as they attempt to reunite them with their families. The aid groups are also working with local communities, which have agreed to welcome back the children recruited by the Cobra Faction, to prevent discrimination and limit the chances that the children are again recruited.

But UN officials stress that the program risks stalling if funding dries up. UNICEF, which is appealing for $10 million in funding, says the process of reintigrating the children costs roughly $2,330 a child over two years.

“At the risk of sounding like other conflict zones, we don’t want to lose another generation here,” Higgins said. “These children, despite everything they’ve gone through, they’re still looking to the future. We mustn’t let them down.”

TIME Yemen

Yemen’s Tumultuous History in 12 Pictures

As Sana'a is again rocked by unrest, TIME looks back at key moments in Yemen's turbulent history

Yemen’s embattled President Abdel-Rabbo Mansour Hadi resigned Thursday after failing to reach a power-sharing agreement with Shi’ite rebels who have held Sana’a, the capital, since September.

Hadi’s departure leaves Yemen’s fate in the balance. The poorest nation in the Arab world is fractured by tribal fighting, a separatist movement in the south, a robust Al-Qaeda presence, and the rising influence of the Shi’ite rebel group known as the Houthis.

But Yemen is no stranger to turmoil. In the images above, TIME looks at key moments in the country’s past that provide a historical context for the unfolding unrest.

TIME Germany

German Court Affirms Man’s Right to Stand While Peeing

Man at Urinal
Brett White—Getty Images/Flickr RF

People who stand should "expect regular significant quarrels with housemates, especially women"

A German court ruled on Thursday that men who pee while standing aren’t responsible for the potential consequences on the bathroom floor.

The Düsseldorf court ruled in favor of a tenant after his landlord tried to withhold part of a security deposit because of stains on the marble bathroom floor allegedly caused by urine, the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung reports.

“Despite growing domestication of men in this matter,” Judge Stefan Hank said, urinating while standing up is still widespread.” Still, he added, people who stand should “expect regular significant quarrels with housemates, especially women.”

[Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung]

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