TIME celebrities

Watch Lady Gaga Take the Ice Bucket Challenge Without Saying a Word

She didn't even flinch

Lady Gaga accepted the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge and completed the task of dumping a bucket of freezing water on her head without saying a word. She didn’t even flinch.

In the video posted to her Instagram feed on Monday, Gaga nearly out Gaga’s herself, sitting cross-legged in a black leotard with matching black lipstick, slowly raising a silver bucket over her head. Her hashtags: #SharePainShowCompassion.

As a part of the challenge, which has raised over $5 million for research into ALS, (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease), those nominated can either agree to dump a bucket of ice water on themselves within 24-hours or donate a $100 to research.

Your move, Adele, Michael Rapino, Vincent Herbert, and Arthur Fogel or, as Gaga said #RichPeople.

TIME apps

Teenage Kid Ignoring Your Calls? There’s an App for That

iphone teenager
Getty Images

The "Ignore No More" application locks teens Android phones until they call mom or dad back

A New York mom got so sick of her teen kids ignoring her calls she created an app so they couldn’t.

Sharon Standifir, the creator of the “Ignore No More” smartphone application, told CBS New York that after repeatedly having her calls to her teens go unanswered, she researched how to develop an application that would shut their phones down until they called her back.

And so, that’s what she created after working with developers for months. The $1.99 app, which is currently only available for download on Android phones, allows parents lock their kids’ phones from a separate device, forcing them to call a list of select numbers (including 911) in order to gain access to the device.

“No calls to friends, no text, no games, notta’ until they call you back. When they do, you can unlock their phone if you choose to do so,” reads the application’s website. “How’s that for parental control?”

 

TIME Crime

Ohio Morgue Worker Admits to Having Sex with 100 Corpses

Mortician covering dead body in morgue
fstop123/Getty Images

"I would just get on top of them and pull my pants down"

An Ohio county where a man admitted to having sex with corpses while employed at the morgue can be held liable for his actions, a federal appeals court has ruled.

Kenneth Douglas, who worked night shifts at the Hamilton County morgue from 1976 until 1992, said in a deposition he had sex with up to 100 dead bodies, often while drunk or high on drugs, WCPO Cincinnati reports. “I would just get on top of them and pull my pants down,” Douglas said.

Families of the victims sued the county in 2012, after Douglas was charged and convicted in three cases of gross abuse of a corpse. Douglas’ DNA was discovered in 2008 on the body of Karen Range, who was 19 when she died in 1992. Douglas reportedly had sex with Range, and other victims, while the bodies were awaiting autopsy.

The county maintains it can’t be held accountable for the actions of its employees. But on Friday, the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled a jury could find the county’s former coroner and morgue “recklessly and wantonly” neglected to supervise Douglas, WCPO reports. This is the fourth lawsuit Hamilton County has faced for allegedly improperly handling corpses.

A key piece of evidence was Douglas’ wife’s testimony that when she called to report her husband coming home from work smelling like sex and alcohol, she was told “whatever happens on county property, in county time, is county business.”

[WCPO Cincinnati]

TIME Election 2014

Sen. Brian Schatz Secures Primary Win in Hawaii

US Sen. Brian Schatz celebrates after defeating fellow Democrat Colleen Hanabusa to retain his senate seat on Aug. 15, 2014 in Hilo, Hawaii.
US Sen. Brian Schatz celebrates after defeating fellow Democrat Colleen Hanabusa to retain his senate seat on Aug. 15, 2014 in Hilo, Hawaii. Marco Garcia—AP

The incumbent won the Democratic primary by a little over 1,700 votes

Sen. Brian Schatz won the Hawaii Senate primary on Friday, following a rare one-day vote in a rural district.

The Associated Press declared a winner at 2:30 a.m. ET on Saturday, which was about 8:30 p.m. local time; polls closed at 7p.m. The Hawaii office of elections reported a close race, with Schatz beating Hanabusa by only 1,769 votes. Schatz outspent Hanabusa by $1.5 million, according to the Center for Responsive Politics, and secured the support of both President Obama and the Democrats’ progressive faction, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.)

“This was obviously an extremely hard-fought race. But we’re gratified that the voters heard our message and recognized that I’ve been working hard for the people of Hawaii,” Schatz told the Associated Press on Friday.

Schatz’s win brings one of the nation’s most tense Senate primary races to a close nearly one week after the official primary election was held. Voters in the district of Puna on Hawaii’s Big Island who were prevented from casting ballots due to damage from a tropical storm were the deciding factor in the Senate race and both candidates focused their attention on the residents throughout the week.

In an interview with a local news station following the election, Rep. Colleen Hanabusa said she thought the influence of mainland groups had a huge impact on this election.

“When you have a lot of mainland interest coming in and they can pour in a lot of money—I think that did make a difference in this election,” Hanabusa told KHON2 News. But, she added, “the people still voted they way they wanted to vote.”

Hanabusa did not say whether she would challenge the results, which she said has been requested due to the election’s low turnout. Residents of Puna are still reeling from Tropical Storm Iselle—according to Hawaii Electric Light, some 3,800 customers are still without power.

The win also essentially secures the incumbent’s seat in Senate—a Republican hasn’t been elected to the Senate from Hawaii since 1970.

TIME Election 2014

Storm-Struck Hawaiians to Decide Senate Primary

Hawaii Primary
U.S. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa waves at drivers while campaigning for U.S. Senate in Honolulu on Aug. 4, 2014. Audrey McAvoy—AP

A special one-day election will decide whether Sen. Brian Schatz or Rep. Colleen Hanabusa secure the primary win in Hawaii

A pocket of voters in a remote area of Hawaii will cast the deciding ballots in one the country’s most tense Senate primary races during a one-day election on Friday.

About 6,800 eligible voters in the former hippie enclave Puna, a rural district in the easternmost area of the Big Island that is still reeling from Tropical Storm Iselle, essentially hold the fate of Democrats Rep. Colleen Hanabusa and Sen. Brian Schatz in their hands. Due to power outages and blocked roads, voters set to cast ballots at Keonepoko Elementary School and Hawaiian Paradise Community Center found their polling stations closed during last Saturday’s primary. About 1,500 voters from the area already sent in absentee ballots and will not be able to vote on Friday, according to Hawaii News Now.

Polls will only open at the two locations, Keonepoko Elementary School and Hawaiian Paradise Community Center, Friday from 7 a.m. until 6p.m. It’s a rare move, offering a handful of voters a lot of power and focusing an inordinate amount attention on the often-forgotten district, as many residents said in interviews with the New York Times.

As of Sunday’s count, Sen. Schatz was 1,635 votes ahead of Hanabussa and the election will likely swing his way following Friday’s vote, though neither camp had given up on trying to sway this handful of voters as it came down the wire. Both candidates traveled to the Puna district this week, distributing water, ice and food to affected residents. More than 6,000 people are still without power, the Hawaii Electric Light company said Thursday.

State lawmakers have called the decision to hold elections amid the recovery insensitive and Rep. Hanabusa filed a lawsuit earlier this week to have the election delayed. On Thursday, Circuit Court Judge Greg Nakamura denied the motion and the election resumed as planned on Friday morning.

In a statement following the judge’s decision, Schatz’s campaign manager Clay Schroers said Schatz “continues to focus his energies on helping the people of Puna to recover.”

Hanabusa’s camp noted that while their recovery efforts would continue, the focus on Friday would be on the election. “We will continue to distribute food, water, fruit and ice to those in need. But we need people to be aware that there is an election tomorrow,” said campaign spokesman Peter Boylan, according to the Associated Press. “This campaign is not over, and we will continue to work very hard to earn every vote.”

Outside progressive groups poured money into helping Schatz, appointed by now-ousted Gov. Neil Abercrombie following the death of longtime Sen. Daniel Inoyue, to help him keep the seat. On the other hand, Inoyue loyalists have bolstered support for Hanabussa, who the late Senator requested to succeed him on his deathbed. Regardless of who wins on Friday, a Democrat is projected to secure the seat in the Senate—the last time a Republican was elected to the Senate from Hawaii was Sen. Hiram Fong in 1970.

TIME Civil Rights

Howard University Students Stand Up for Michael Brown in Viral Photo

Howard Dont Shoot Ferguson
Howard University students pose with their hands raised in Cramton Auditorium in Washington on Aug. 13, 2014. Howard University

300 students got involved

An image of Howard University students standing up in protest against the shooting of black teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. went viral on Wednesday.

More than 300 students gathered in Cramton Auditorium on Howard University’s campus in Washington D.C. to stand together, hands raised, in a pose inspired by the presumed stance of the unarmed teen killed by a police officer last weekend. The incident has led to violent protests in the St. Louis suburb, and inspired a national conversation about race and policing.

The shooting also hit close to home in the Howard University community—a recent alum and St. Louis native, Mya White, was allegedly shot in the head on Tuesday during protests in the St. Louis town. The wounds were non-fatal and White is recovering, but the incident has resonated across the Washington D.C. campus. Vice President of the Howard University Student Association, and one of the photos organizers, Ikenna Ikeotuonye told TIME Thursday, he believes White’s injury sparked a sense of urgency among the student body.

“Howard has a history of social justice, inspiring social change,” Ikeotuonye, a senior chemical engineering major said. “Our idea was just to organize something—but the fact that there was a Bison hurting for protesting hit close to home.”

The image spread rapidly on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram Wednesday night, driven by hashtags including #dontshootus, #dontshootme, and #HowardU.

The post came as violent clashes between police and protesters escalated Wednesday night. A heavily militarized police force fired tear gas, smoke bombs and rubber bullets into crowds as protestors lobbed Molotov cocktails and rocks at police. At least 10 people were arrested.

TIME College Sports

Arizona State University Student Now 1st Openly Gay Division I Football Player

Edward "Chip" Sarafin
Edward "Chip" Sarafin in Phoenix. Arizona State University outside linebacker Sarafin has told a local magazine he is gay, making him the first active Division I football player to come out Arizon State University/AP

Edward Sarafin, a fifth-year student working toward a master's in biomedical engineering, is a linebacker for the Sun Devils

Correction appended, Aug. 14

An Arizona State University football player became the first openly gay Division I football player on Wednesday after coming out in an article published in a gay sports magazine.

Edward “Chip” Sarafin is an offensive lineman with a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering and who is working toward his master’s at Arizona State University. He told Compete, an Arizona-based gay sports magazine, he started coming out to his teammates last spring so they’d hear it from him, rather than through rumors.

“It was really personal to me, and it benefited my peace of mind greatly,” Sarafin said.

Leaders within the Arizona Sun Devils Athletic Department issued statements in support of Sarafin on Wednesday, while members of the Sun Devil Brotherhood tweeted messages of encouragement. “The entire athletics department is extremely proud of Chip and is unequivocally supportive of him,” vice president of university athletics Ray Anderson said, noting Sarafin’s achievements on and off of the field, including research he’s conducted on football-related concussion.

The football team’s head coach Todd Graham said, “”We are a brotherhood that is not defined by cultural and personal differences, but rather an individual’s commitment to the Sun Devil Way.”

Sarafin’s openness about his sexuality comes months after the NFL drafted its first ever openly gay player Michael Sam, who is currently a linebacker for the St. Louis Rams. On Wednesday, Sam sent out a congratulatory tweet to Sarafin.

Correction: The original version of this story misstated Sarafin’s position.

TIME Food

This Is How the Potato-Salad Kickstarter Guy Plans to Spend the Money

Potato salad at a picnic
Lauri Patterson—Vetta/Getty Images

The guy who raised over $55,000 to make potato salad is throwing a festival and donating money to fight homelessness in Ohio

The guy who raised over $50,000 on Kickstarter to make potato salad has big (and charitable) plans for the funds 6,911 people helped him raise.

On Sept. 27, Zach Brown will host a free family-friendly festival called PotatoStock in a Columbus, Ohio, park. The festival is set to feature local artists and reportedly boasts relevant sponsors like Hellmann’s and Idaho Potatoes.

On Twitter, the account for Idaho Potatoes seemed excited about the event.

The festival, which Mashable reports will feature an estimated 200 lb. to 300 lb. of potato salad, also has a philanthropic ingredient. Proceeds from concessions sold at the festival will be donated to help end homelessness in Central Ohio.

“We are going to contribute a significant portion of the remaining money to the fund at the Columbus Foundation,” Brown wrote in July announcement. “This will create a permanent fund to help Central Ohio’s non-profits end hunger and homelessness. These types of funds gain interest every year and grow over time, so, while our little internet joke will one day be forgotten, the impact will be felt forever.”

In an interview with Mashable, Brown said he’s still working to secure a big name that will draw a significant crowd to his potato fest — but he’s sure his Kickstarter backers will show up.

“I keep hearing people saying that they plan to road trip to PotatoStock from [out] of town,” Brown told Mashable. “I’d love to see a huge pilgrimage to Columbus.”

TIME Crime

2 Journalists Arrested, Detained in Ferguson, Mo., While Covering Protests

They were covering protests in the Missouri town that have been raging in the wake of the deadly shooting of 18-year-old Mike Brown

Updated August 14 at 1:00 a.m. ET

Two journalists said they were arrested and detained Wednesday in Ferguson, Mo., while covering protests that have been raging in the wake of the deadly police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown last week.

Ryan Reilly of the Huffington Post and Wesley Lowery of the Washington Post tweeted they were arrested while doing reporting at a McDonald’s restaurant in Ferguson. “Police came into McD where me and @ryanjreilly working,” Lowery tweeted. “Try to kick everyone out.”

Reilly later tweeted that they were arrested for “not packing their bags quick enough” at the McDonald’s. The two journalists have been covering the aftermath of the shooting of the unarmed teen in Ferguson, which has sparked protests in the suburban St. Louis town. Lowery said on the Rachel Maddow Show on Wednesday that the McDonald’s was located near “ground zero” of protests that have drawn national media attention.

In a first-hand account of his own arrest published in the Washington Post late Wednesday night, Lowery offered a detailed account of the arrest, as well as video of a police officer telling him to stop filming. Although he did not resist the officers taking him into custody, Lowery writes, they slammed him into a soda machine.

His account of the arrest includes this exchange:

“I hope you’re happy with yourself,” one officer told me. And I responded: “This story’s going to get out there. It’s going to be on the front page of The Washington Post tomorrow.”

And he said, “Yeah, well, you’re going to be in my jail cell tonight.”

A strong police force greeted protesters on Wednesday—Huffington Post‘s Reilly tweeted images of officers with assault weapons, wearing helmets, and peering from out of armored vehicles.

Lowery said police detained the two, though they were later released without charges.

Calls to the St. Louis County Police Department to confirm the arrests were not immediately returned.

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