TIME Art

Google Doodle Celebrates Corita Kent, Feminist Nun Turned Artist

Google

It would have been her 96th birthday

Google celebrated what would have been the 96th birthday of artist Corita Kent on Thursday — also known as Sister Corita Kent.

In 1936, Kent started her career as a Catholic nun. She began taking art classes, and received a masters in art history — chairing the art history department at Immaculate Heart College. In 1968, she left the order and decided to pursue a full-time career as an artist.

Kent was known for her silk screens, and she often juxtaposed spiritual writing alongside symbols of consumerist culture. She was a well-known activist, fighting for civil rights, anti-war causes, and women’s rights.

She died in 1986.

TIME celebrity

Raven-Symone Denies Rumors She Was Sexually Assaulted by Bill Cosby

"I was practically a baby on that show"

As more and more women have come forward to accuse comedian Bill Cosby of sexual assault, actress Raven-Symone’s name has been pulled into the discussion.

Raven-Symone, who was just three years old when she began appearing on The Cosby Show, took to Instagram on Wednesday to deny the claims swirling online. Along with a picture of herself as a child wagging a finger, she writes:

I was NOT taken advantage of by Mr Cosby when I was on The Cosby Show! I was practically a baby on that show and this is truly a disgusting rumor that I want no part of. Everyone on that show treated me with nothing but kindness. Now keep me out of this!

MORE: Here’s Everything We Know (and Don’t Know) About the Bill Cosby Rape Allegations

TIME movies

Here’s Where to Watch Mike Nichols’ Movies Online

Signature Theatre Company's 20th Anniversary Gala
Director Mike Nichols attends the Signature Theatre Company's 20th Anniversary Gala at Espace on November 8, 2010 Jim Spellman—WireImage

From The Graduate to Charlie Wilson's War

Beloved director Mike Nichols, husband of Diane Sawyer, died suddenly of cardiac arrest Wednesday. He was 83.

Hollywood is mourning the loss of a great director, writer and producer, whose work included directing The Graduate and The Birdcage, and serving as a producer on HBO’s Angels in America . Nichols was one of only 12 people to win an EGOT — Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony — over the span of his career.

For those who want to revisit some of Nichols’ work, here’s a list of some of his movies that are available to rent and stream online:

  • Charlie Wilson’s War, 2007 — Amazon (rent)
  • Closer, 2004 — Amazon (rent)
  • Angels in America, 2003 — HBO (streaming), Amazon (streaming)
  • Primary Colors, 1998 — Amazon (rent)
  • The Birdcage, 1996 — Netflix (streaming, Amazon (streaming)
  • Wolf, 1994 — Netflix (rent)
  • Regarding Henry, 1991 — Amazon (rent)
  • Postcards from the Edge, 1990 — Amazon (rent)
  • Working Girl, 1988 — Amazon (rent)
  • Biloxi Blues, 1988 — Amazon (rent)
  • Heartburn, 1986 — Netflix (streaming), Amazon (streaming)
  • Carnal Knowledge, 1971 — Amazon (rent)
  • Catch-22, 1970 — Amazon (rent)
  • The Graduate, 1967 — Netflix (streaming), Amazon (streaming)
  • Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, 1966 — Amazon (rent)
TIME society

Mattel Apologizes for Making Barbie Look Incompetent in Barbie: I Can Be a Computer Engineer

Barbie

The sexist picture book has been slammed online

One of Barbie’s future careers should be in damage control.

Mattel and Random House found themselves at the center of an online firestorm this week when the Internet lampooned a book called Barbie: I Can be a Computer Engineer. A more accurate title would be Barbie: I Can be a Computer Engineer… If the Boys Do All the Work For Me.

Although Amazon lists the book as being published in July 2013, VP of Barbie’s Global Brand Marketing Lori Pantel told TIME that it came was published in 2010 and that “since that time we have reworked our Barbie books.”

On Monday, comedian Pamela Ribbon found the book at a friends house and ripped it to shreds on her blog, inspiring major backlash.

So what did the Twitterverse get in a tizzy about? Although the book’s title would indicate that its fights stereotypes against the tech industry’s gender gap, readers only need only get it to the second page to find out that Barbie is completely incompetent. While she’s capable of conceptualizing a game about a cute robot puppy (gender cliche, but we were ready to go with it — who doesn’t like robot puppies?), Barbie needs boys to actually do the computer programing for her. When Skipper asks if she can see the program, “Barbie says, laughing, ‘I’ll need Steven’s and Brian’s help to turn it into a real game!’” Silly Skipper and your high expectations!

The rest of the book involves Barbie crashing her computer (duh), passing a virus to Skipper (a pillow fight ensues… I mean, really), ignoring her female computer teacher’s advice on how to fix the virus (because if we’ve learned one thing, it’s that ladies should not be trusted with such things), and finally letting brogrammers come to her rescue. While Steve and Brian seem like nice enough guys, they don’t even teach Barbie what to do on her hot pink laptop.

“The portrayal of Barbie in this specific story doesn’t reflect the Brand’s vision for what Barbie stands for,” says Pantel. “We believe girls should be empowered to understand that anything is possible and believe they live in a world without limits. We apologize that this book didn’t reflect that belief. All Barbie titles moving forward will be written to inspire girls imaginations and portray an empowered Barbie character.”

In case they were in need of inspiration, people have been tweeting funny rewrites of the text so that it actually empowers women.

Barbie has been derided for a lot of things — her anatomically impossible figure, for example — but her career goals seemed on track if not admirable. She has been to space and business school But success involves more than just dressing the part. If you pair a doll with a hot pink laptop, she better know how to use it.

Maybe we should all just stick to GoldieBlox, a toy that teaches and encourages girls to do engineering themselves.

Read next: Watch Little Kids React to a Realistic-Looking Barbie Alternative

TIME Body Image

Watch Little Kids React to a Realistic-Looking Barbie Alternative

"She looks like a regular girl going to school."

The dolls kids are used to playing with are often nipped and tucked to have impossibly big eyes and a ridiculously small waist. So when Nickolay Lamm presented a Pennsylvania class of second graders with his Barbie alternative, his newly created Lammily doll which has the measurements of an average 19-year-old woman (according to CDC data) rather than an anatomically impossible mutant, he didn’t know how they were going to react.

Most of the kids thought the doll, available for purchase Wednesday, looked kind of familiar.

“She looks like my sister!” one girl exclaimed, smiling. “She kind of looks like my aunt Katie,” said another.

“She looks like a regular girl going to school.”

“She looks like she would help someone if they were hurt.”

“She’s not like other dolls… she looks real.”

That reality check didn’t prove to be a bad thing. When presented with a blonde and busty Barbie, the children said that they’d rather have the one who, if real, “would be able to stand.” A very apt observations, considering previous research showing Barbie wouldn’t be able to lift her head fully if she were an actual human.

Of course unrealistic looking dolls are still very popular whether it’s Barbie or the Monster High collection with their mini-skirts and platform-heeled thigh-high boots. In 2012, researchers asked 60 girls, ages six to nine, to choose one of two paper dolls: one dressed in a tight “sexy” outfit and the other wearing a “fashionable” but loose and covered up outfit. Sixty-eight percent of the girls wanted to look like the sexy doll and 72% thought she would be “more popular” than the conservative looking paper doll. That study had a limited sample size, and paper dolls are no match for 3D toys, but the results are an indication of how difficult it is to change cultural trends.

But perhaps after a decade during which dolls have gotten ever more racy, perhaps parents and kids are ready for an appealing alternative to the bug-eyed, wasp-waisted creatures that now populate the girls aisle. At least that’s what Lamm is betting on.

Read more about the Lammily doll — and her strange accessory packs — here.

Read next: Mattel Apologizes for Making Barbie Look Incompetent in Barbie: I Can Be a Computer Engineer

TIME Body Image

The New ‘Normal Barbie’ Comes With an Average Woman’s Proportions — and Cellulite-Sticker Accessories

"I wanted to show that reality is cool," says the creator of the Lammily doll

Screen shot 2014-11-19 at 3.57.10 AMIt’s a month before the holidays and you’re grappling with a serious toy buyer’s dilemma: 0n the one hand, you kind of just want to get your kid a Barbie; on the other hand you’d rather not perpetuate the peddling of anatomical ideals that are so impossible to achieve — and impractical. (Were Barbie human, she’d have to walk on all fours because of her tiny feet and because she would only have room for half a liver.)

That’s why graphic designer turned toymaker Nickolay Lamm created the Lammily doll — what the Barbie would look like if she actually had the measurements of an average 19-year-old woman’s body (based on CDC data). And brown hair. (She also comes with a sticker-extension pack, complete with cellulite, freckles and acne, but we’ll get to that later.)

What started as an art project in July 2013 became available for purchase and delivery Wednesday. “Parents and their kids were emailing and asking where they could buy the ‘normal Barbie’ — but they didn’t exist,” Lamm, 26, tells TIME. And so he decided to crowdfund his creation, raising $501,000 for his $95,000 target goal. “To be honest, I knew it was either going to bomb or blow up, there was no in between,” Lamm says.

Lamm also created a video that transforms a Lammily doll into a Barbie to really get his point across:

“I wanted to show that reality is cool,” Lamm says. “And a lot of toys make kids go into fantasy, but why don’t they show real life is cool? It’s not perfect, but it’s really all we have. And that’s awesome.”

But real proportions and movement weren’t enough. Before putting the $24.99 dolls on sale — 19,000 dolls are going to backers, but 25,000 more are ready to be shipped before the holidays — Lamm decided to take things a step further.

Enter the $5.99 sticker-extension pack, available in January. Lamm says it took four months to find the proper sticker material, that gives the doll’s face acne, freckles, moles and the ability to blush:

Lammily
Lammily
Lammily

Lamm also decided to include scrapes and bruises. “Some people were like ‘Oh my God,’ as if I’m promoting domestic violence or something,” says Lamm, before assuring TIME that that was far from his intention. “Look, we all get boo boos and scratches. Life isn’t perfect, we all sometimes fall down but we get back up.”

Lammily

Lamm’s aunt recommended he add scars, he says, “because, you know, some kids have scars and are really shy about them.”

Lammily

But then there’s the cellulite and the stretch marks:

Lammily
Lammily

Unleashing a doll with stretch marks on the Internet is basically asking for trouble. But Lamm insists that it came from a sincere place, and that some people will welcome the option. “Demi Lovato even tweeted about it,” he says:

“You know, people were saying this whole project was a joke from the beginning, so I have no doubt some people will take it as a joke,” Lamm says. “But I hope there are enough people who believe what I believe. I think 25% to 30% will think the stickers are stupid and the rest will think it’s good.”

The Lammily will have other fashion options in January:

Lammily

“This is the doll people have been waiting for,” Lamm says. Stretch marks and all.

See More: Watch Little Girls React to the Realistic Barbie Alternative

Read next: New GoldieBlox Doll Takes Aim at ‘Barbie’ Beauty Standards

TIME weather

These Photos From Buffalo’s Snowstorm Will Make You Want to Stay Inside Until Spring

Winter isn't just coming — it's here. Buffalo, NY experienced its first big snow storm of the year, seeing upwards of 5 ft. of snow. Just how bad is it? Check out these photos pulled primarily from Twitter and Instagram of the storm.

Read next: State of Emergency Declared as Buffalo Pounded by Snowstorm

TIME Television

Billy Eichner and Julie Klausner to Star in Amy Poehler’s New Hulu Comedy

In a new series called Difficult People

—You can shout the news to New York City, pedestrians! Billy Eichner will star in Amy Poehler’s new comedy series for Hulu!

The company announced Tuesday a series called Difficult People, which will star Eichner and comedic writer and performer Julie Klausner, with whom he collaborates on Billy on the Street — a show that largely involves shouting pop culture trivia to people on the street.

In case you’re not familiar with the very funny Klausner yet, here’s her appearance as “the cat whisperer” in this Funny or Die short.

“This hilarious series follows Billy Eichner and Julie Klausner as best friends and struggling comedians in New York City who can’t figure out why they aren’t likable,” Hulu Head of Originals Beatrice Springborn wrote on the company blog. “Klausner wrote the pilot and will also serve as an executive producer for the series alongside Amy Poehler (Parks and Recreation) and Dave Becky (Louie).”

Hulu is working in collaboration with Universal Cable Productions. Shooting will begin early in 2015.

Now to celebrate, let us watch Poehler and Eichner sing carols to innocent bystanders:

TIME movies

Watch the First Peanuts Movie Trailer

Good grief!

Paul Feig, the director of Bridesmaids and producer of the highly anticipated Peanuts 3-D movie, just learned that he can “never trust a beagle.”

While 20th Century Fox initially pegged the 2015 film’s first trailer to premiere on Thanksgiving, it “leaked” 10 days early.

Rats!

TIME celebrity

Kim Kardashian on Nude Photo Shoot: ‘I Did It for Me’

"I love the photos"

It seems like just about everyone has an opinion about Kim Kardashian’s Internet-”breaking” nude photoshoot for Paper magazine. The reality star herself is no exception.

“I’m never one to preach, but I felt really positive and really good about myself,” she said on the Australian show The Project Tuesday. “I love the photos, I did it for me, I hope other people like them.”

Kardashian also praised photographer Jean-Paul Goude: “I was so honored and excited to work with him because he is a legend. And she added that the poses, which included balancing a champagne glass on her butt, made her “back hurt for about a week.”

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