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This Clown Takes You Behind the Scenes at the World’s Best Circuses

Lukas Berger discovers that the best way to photograph the circus is to join it

“Once the curtain opens, the show begins. The audience laughs, is amazed, some are beginning to cry. The emotions are noticeable. They are triggered by the gestures and movements of a man with a red nose, baggy trousers and a unique clumsiness.”

In 2010, while working for the Austrian civil service in Pakistan, Lukas Berger stumbled upon the traveling Lucky Irani Circus. An avid clown and juggler, he was completely enthralled. Lukas felt compelled to document circus life, but felt he lacked the photographic expertise to do it justice. He moved back to Hanover for three years to hone his skills at Hochschule Hannover’s Photojournalism & Documentary Program. Then in 2012 he returned to photograph and occasionally perform with three different circuses on three continents.

Yonas ShibeshiLukas Berger dressed as a clown at the Circus Debere Berhan in Ethiopia.

Pakistan: Lucky Irani Circus

“I slept in a different bed every day, the lions were roaring and one of the midget clowns was after me.”

All Lukas had to reconnect with the Pakistani circus was a single business card given to him by one of the acrobats. They did not have an active phone number or email address, and constantly traveled around the country. After weeks on their tail, including multiple 12-hour bus rides, he was finally able to catch up with them.

Lukas started off by tagging along. He didn’t have a place to sleep, often sleeping next to the monkey’s cage. The circus was a large-scale production, drawing crowds of up to 5,000 spectators and it was difficult for him to find his place. As he built trust with the circus, they allowed him to perform as a clown alongside two midgets, who performed a good cop–bad cop routine. In an initiation of sorts, the bad cop hit him over the head with a cricket stick during a performance hard enough to break it in half. After that incident he was allowed to travel with the circus.

Midget clowns Tareeq & Mohammed
Lukas BergerMidget clowns Tareeq & Mohammed

Germany: Circus Roncalli

“In the circus area there is a café, a caravan for teaching the children, an office caravan, horse stable, a ticket trolley, a workshop and stalls where you can buy popcorn and other goodies.”

Next, Lukas went to north Germany and traveled with the world-renowned Circus Roncalli for six months. This time, he lived in a small caravan of his own. The deal was that he could travel with the circus if he spent two days a week shooting images they could use for advertising and one day a week shooting for his project. The rest of the time, he trained with a few of Roncalli’s children and clowns. He also did odd jobs from selling tickets to working on the circus’s website. These duties, he said, were shared: “In a circus family, you do whatever is needed.”

He was impressed by the level of professionalism and the hierarchical structure of the circus. “Life there varies depending on contracts and level of fame. A minimum of six languages are spoken in this small circus town. Circus Roncalli is a great example of peaceful and friendly coexistence between different nationalities.”

Ethiopia: Circus Debere Berhan

“The troupe loves to perform on the streets of Ethiopian cities. Without great advertising and advance notice, half the city gathers around the performances. Shortly before the show, Yirgalem and Zakarias run on stilts through the streets to pick up as many people as possible. After the last act, young and old Ethiopians gather around the troupe and ask questions about the circus.”

After struggling to find a circus in Africa that would let him in, Lukas landed with Circus Debere Berhan. One of the few remaining circuses in the country, they perform near the capital, Addis Ababa, often walking between locations. Despite poor lighting and no heating or air-conditioning, Berger was impressed by the circus’s extreme discipline. “Despite all of these hardships, the circus manages not only to survive but to grow.” Most spectators don’t have the means to pay for tickets, as a result the circus is supported by NGOs and other European circuses. Lukas grew close to this circus, training its clowns and joining them for group meals. He loved their unique circus tradition of drinking their coffee with a side of popcorn.

Each time, Lukas was given the opportunity to stay on as a clown. Instead, he opted to move on, continuing his project elsewhere. Now he’s planning to approach a circus on another continent — his fourth — most likely in Chile.

Yirgalem Shemelis & Zekarias Kefyalew from Circus Debere Berhan
Lukas BergerYirgalem Shemelis & Zekarias Kefyalew from Circus Debere Berhan

Lukas Berger is a Hanover-based Austrian photographer. Circus was published as a book by Kettler. He is also the co-founder of the gallery–art space BOHAI.

Josh Raab is a contributor to TIME LightBox. Follow him on Instagram and Twitter.

TIME apps

Instagram’s New ‘Layout’ App Makes it Easy to Create Photo Collages

The new app is Instagram's second standalone product

Instagram is taking a page out of Facebook’s playbook by launching a standalone app that makes it easier to create collages from your favorite photos.

Layout, which launches Monday for Apple’s iOS, comes after the Facebook-owned Instagram found that one in five of its monthly active users were sharing images that combined multiple photos using third-party tools. That represents more than 60 million Instagram users turning to other companies’ software to create these collages.

While Instagram’s first stand-alone app, Hyperlapse, was the brainchild of two of the company’s software engineers, work on Layout started with a top-down decision from Instagram CEO and co-founder Kevin Systrom. Systrom felt the process of creating collages was too fragmented: Before Layout, users had to use multiple apps, save various versions of images on iPhones’ camera roll, then open the Instagram app to post the results.

With Layout, Instagram sought to make the process as straightforward as possible. When you first open the app, you’re greeted with your camera roll images and the option to sort your photos by most recent. But since 90% of all collage images shared on Instagram are of people, the company tells TIME, Layout also offers a “Faces” option, which instantly brings together all of the portraits available in your photo library.

Instagram's
Instagram’s “Layout”

Once you start selecting images – you can work with up to nine of your photographs at a time – you’re offered a choice of layout options from the traditional horizontal and vertical diptychs all the way to a seamless square grid of nine.

What distinguishes Layout from other collage apps is the complete absence of border options, which Instagram says was a conscious choice, especially since it’s encouraging users to experiment with symmetry effects to create out-of-this-world images. And that’s where the mirror and flip options come in, which, combined with the ability to zoom in and out of each element of your collage, can result in more creative images.

Once you’ve finally tweaked your collage, you’re offered the choice to share it directly on Instagram and Facebook, or to open it in another app.

Without a doubt, Layout’s simplicity – both in its ease of use and the small number of available editing options – will make this app popular among selfie aficionados, a fact from which Instagram doesn’t shy away. Layout even includes a predominant “Photo Booth” mode that will take up to four photos using your iPhone’s front-facing camera and automatically place them into one of 10 available layouts. The feature, says Instagram, is particularly popular in Asia, where the company is looking to grow in the coming months.

In the end, Instagram’s Layout app doesn’t reinvent the wheel, offering little by way of novelty other than a more streamlined collage experience for Instagram’s power users. But that’s all it needs to do: keep Instagram users happy and within the app’s own ecosystem.

TIME technology

You Won’t Believe These Incredible Photos Were All Taken With iPhones

These exclusive photos show how Apple is putting the focus on its customers photos, not products, in a new ad campaign

Apple is turning the spotlight on its users in a new international ad campaign that will see photos taken “by real people” displayed on billboards across the world.

The switch in tactic—a first for a brand that traditionally favors product shots—will highlight the iPhone’s increasingly prevalent role in photography, both among amateurs and professionals, and is inspired by the popular use of the #iphoneonly hashtag on Instagram.

"Shot on iPhone6" billboard in Herald Square, New York City on March 3, 2015.
Josh Raab For TIME“Shot on iPhone6″ billboard in Herald Square, New York City on March 3, 2015.

In recent years, Apple’s popular phone has become one of the most used cameras in the world, with various models topping Flickr’s Camera charts since early 2011.

The new ads, which will be displayed on billboards, bus stops and train stations, will remain minimalistic, featuring a photograph, with the words: Shot on iPhone. To coincide with the worldwide outdoor and print campaign, Apple has also unveiled a new online gallery of images shot by 77 photographers in 70 cities across 24 countries.

Some of the photographers featured are among Instagram’s most popular users from Pei Ketron to Austin Mann and Cole Rise. “[The campaign] was a slightly mysterious process,” says Rise. “An ‘un-named’ company had reached out to my photography rep looking for exceptional examples of photos taken on an iPhone 6 or iPhone 6 Plus. I spent a few days rummaging through the archives of photos taken on a variety of recent trips across the Northwest, selecting the 15 or so that told the best story. Learning that this company was in fact Apple was both a pleasant surprise and incredible honor, having carried every iPhone model since launch.”

Olivier Laurent is the editor of TIME LightBox. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @olivierclaurent

Josh Raab is a contributor to TIME Lightbox. Follow him on Instagram and Twitter

TIME medicine

7 Dizzying GIFs of Spinning Cannabis Strains

This new approach to cannabis photography was created by the San Diego based company Nugshots. Applying traditional still-life photography techniques, the company began by photographing buds of marijuana for local dispensaries. The images are created using a computer-controlled motor, rotating the marijuana buds only a few degrees at a time. The resulting 50 photographs were then color-corrected and uploaded onto a custom-built player that allows the viewer to rotate the images by dragging their cursor.

Each crop of plants produces unique buds, which requires the dispensaries to commission new photography for each shipment that comes in.

Nugshots has turned its attention toward more stable forms of marijuana-related income. They recently released T-shirts with their macro images printed on them. Soon they will be releasing a book of marijuana photography entitled Green: A Field Guide to Marijuana, featuring hi-resolution macro photography of over 170 different strains.

TIME On Our Radar

It Takes Two to Tango: Instagram Account Brings Photographers Together

Ben Lowy and David Scott Holloway—Echosight

On the Echosight Instagram account, photographers are invited to collaborate to create double-exposure works of art

Photography is rarely a team sport. However, Daniella Zalcman and Danny Ghitis have managed to turn it into one.

Two years ago they were living over three thousand miles apart and wanted to find a way to collaborate. The pair formed the Instagram account Echosight and began combining their photos into double exposures by superimposing the images onto each other. For Zalcman, this process allowed them to achieve something they could not have done on their own: There’s much more depth to the collaborative aspect. And I think there’s much more dialogue visually in what we produced.”

After six months they realized they did not have the bandwidth to continue posting daily and decided to do something that is rare in photography. They handed off their concept and platform, asking other photographers to pair up and take over the feed.

Each week-long collaboration yielded astoundingly different results, starting with Ed Kashi and Laura El Tantway.

We spoke with some of the photographers about working in pairs, and we also asked them to name the artists they would like to see collaborate on Echosight in the future.

Barbara Davidson & Chip Litherland

Years ago Davidson and Litherland worked together at the Dallas Morning News. For them, Echosight was a perfect excuse to work in a pair again. Litherland posted from Florida while Davidson, a staff photographer for the Los Angeles Times, was visiting family at home in Ireland. For her, Echosight was a welcomed change of pace. “I think it’s a freeing experience in many ways because there are so many guidelines that I have to follow when I am photographing as a photojournalist,” she says. “Whereas when we’re creating for the sake of creating and it’s much more of a conceptual artful image, we’re free to produce it anyway we see fit. That’s very liberating, very freeing and the images can be more poetic.” The two had a difficult time managing the nine-hour time difference though, and in the end Chip had to stitch together the images rather than engaging in a back and forth.

Davidson’s Dream Collaboration: Paolo Pellegrin & his wife Kathryn Cook

Matt Borowick & Nancy Borowick

The brother and sister team are close in age and live only a few miles apart, but their visual approaches to the world around them are surprisingly different. Their process began with Matt sending his favorite 35mm images to Nancy, including the image of the Empire State Building above. Nancy then shot images she felt would pair well with them. “I wanted the Echosight images to make sense and tell a little bit of a story,” says Nancy. “I wanted them to be very purposeful so the end result would be a more cohesive group of images.” She felt their images got stronger as the project progressed and she developed a better understanding of how Matt shoots. Nancy had always known her brother’s work but as a sibling, and after collaborating with him, she felt she understood it from a professional perspective as well.

Nancy’s Dream Collaboration: Ben Lowy & Marvi Lacar

Richard Koci Hernandez & Dan Cristea

Hernandez and Cristea teamed up after a chance encounter on Instagram. A mutual appreciation for one another’s work led to Skype conversations and eventually in-person meetings. For Echosight they took a purist approach, using an app that picked images at random from each photographer and combined them. For Hernandez, that element of chance was “frightening, freeing, and invigorating all at the same time,” he says. “Something new is born, something you can’t predict.” They felt Echosight should be more an act of happenstance than intentional creation.

Hernandez’s Dream Collaboration: Travis Jensen & Daniel Arnold

Ramsay de Give & Dylan Isbell

De Give and Isbell became friends at the Brooks Institute’s School of Photography when they discovered their shared a similar interest for botany. For their collaboration, they photographed plants together, and combined them with de Give’s portraits, creating a series of solid and consistent multiple exposures. Minimizing the element of chance that is standard for Echosight, they “wanted it to be structured and a full thought rather than just hoping it would work,” Isbell tells TIME. Despite having a set direction, they welcomed the elements of chance inherent in combining the images. “Collaboration is two people working together, two minds working towards the same idea,” says de Give. “But at the same time, both have to let go to let the vision speak for itself. It’s hard to do that but it really pays off in the end.”

Isbell’s Dream Collaboration: Michael Goldberg & Daniel Arnold

Ben Lowy & David Scott Holloway

This best friend duo have been working side by side for years. Rather than combining their best images, they went out searching for images that would combine well together. “Sometimes people fall too in love with their images,” says Lowy. “We created the images knowing that we were going to mold them together. We had ideas in our minds about how we were going to approach it, like who was doing background that day and who was doing foreground. Who was working more with negative space.” The foreground images had to have plenty of negative space to allow for the busier background images to show through. Lowy and Holloway became one of the most successful Echosight teams by cross-posting the images on their own Instagram accounts, which have a combined 170,000 followers.

Lowy’s Dream Collaboration: Sally Mann & Terry Richardson

Given the feed’s recent success, Ghitis and Zalcman plan to keep Echosight as a takeover account for the foreseeable future. In addition to the commonly artful mashups, Zalcman would like to see it take a newsier approach. She is “trying to move more in that direction because 95% of the photographers who have taken over Echosight are pure photojournalists and not fine art photographers, so that really is their wheel house. and I would love to see that happen more. But I do also like that it’s a space for news photographers to do something that is completely different and completely creative.”

Echosight is run by photographers Daniella Zalcman and Danny Ghitis. They can be contacted on Echosight’s Facebook page.

Josh Raab is a contributor to TIME Lightbox. Follow him on Instagram and Twitter.

TIME Toolbox

Here's What It's Like Inside the First Virtual Reality Documentary

Is virtual reality the future of documentary work? Danfung Dennis seems to think so as he unveils his first immersive film designed for Oculus Rift

Correction appended, Oct. 28.

Putting on a virtual reality headset feels a little like wearing the gaudiest pair of sunglasses ever: they’re awkward, unflattering — but they somehow manage to be kind of fun. Earlier this month, I was given the opportunity to try an Oculus Rift in one of TIME’s meeting rooms, sampling some imagery from Zero Point, the first movie ever shot in 3D, 360 degree video specifically for virtual reality.

I was transported to a whole new world.

I found myself in different settings — a virtual prairie surrounded by buffalos, a beach with a beautiful woman, and finally a military training session. The experience was a little overwhelming at first, but it didn’t take long for me to get used to it. It seemed that my brain was able to accept the virtual world almost as easily as it does the real one. When I finally returned to the conference room, though, it all seemed a little underwhelming.

Condition One
Condition One

The film Zero Point follows the pioneers, researchers, and developers of virtual reality, and is spearheaded by Danfung Dennis’s tech startup Condition One. The film uses footage from between three and 30 cameras, each shooting simultaneously at a slightly different angle, before being stitched together to create a seamless user experience. To view this film, you must own an Oculus Rift headset, which is currently only available to developers.

Nintendo Virtual Boy 1994; Oculus Rift 2014
Reuters; AP

Facebook’s recent $2 billion acquisition of Oculus VR, creators of the virtual reality headset Oculus Rift, has spurred a massive resurgence of interest in virtual reality technology. For decades, the gaming industry has unsuccessfully attempted to introduce immersive headsets, but only now is the technology reaching a point where it can be used as a new documentary tool.

“The traditional rules of filmmaking and storytelling do not apply,” Dennis tells TIME. “There is no frame and it’s actually the audience or the user who’s deciding the frame and what’s of interest to them.”

“Anything that helps storytellers create more understanding and empathy for the people and issues that we are covering is worth exploring,” adds Brian Storm, founder and executive producer of the multimedia production studio MediaStorm. “It may take some time, but it’s clear that important storytelling can be elevated in the virtual reality space.” Indeed, the immersive experience may make room for a deeper connection between the viewer and the content – even an emotional one.

Condition One
Condition One

Similar technologies are already being used by the military to create flight simulators, and by doctors to practice surgeries. Ford uses it to assist designers in developing car prototypes, and NASA has been experimenting with controlling robots remotely and even simulating walks on Mars.

Dennis and his team have equally grand ambitions for virtual reality. They see it as a way to connect people to current events by using it in breaking news situations; ones that the general public lacks personal connection to. Of course, these aspirations will have to contend with the exorbitant price tag currently associated with the production of these visual experiences.

Beyond breaking news, Dennis also imagines the technology could be introduce to schools to expand on the classic curriculum: “They’re not reading a textbook about ancient Rome,” Dennis says, “They’re in ancient Rome.”

Dennis would also like to direct nature documentaries on pressing ecological concerns, with the goal of putting viewers in remote areas of high biodiversity. Places that “are threatened by deforestation or coral reefs that are acidifying and disappearing, or species that are on the brink of extinction,” he says. “Distill really complex, abstract problems that humanity is facing into experiences that we understand.”

Zero Point as seen through the Oculus Rift headset
Zero Point

For Dennis, even that is just a starting point. Eventually we will want more than to simply look around, he says. “We’re going to want our bodies in there, our hands in there. We’re going to be able to stand up, start walking around a scene, moving around it. That’s going to be mind-blowing.”

Dennis agrees that a fully immersive virtual experience might seem scary, even dangerous, to some, but he believes that temporarily imitating reality to the fullest extent is a natural urge, at least for him.

And yet, there is a great deal of software innovation necessary to bring even his simplest technological ideas to fruition, but for the first time it seems a matter of when and not if.

Correction: The original version of this story misattributed a quotation. It was Brian Storm, founder and executive producer of the multimedia production studio Media Storm, who said, “Anything that helps storytellers create more understanding and empathy for the people and issues that we are covering is worth exploring. It may take some time, but it’s clear that important storytelling can be elevated in the virtual reality space.”


Zero Point is an immersive film created by Condition One for the Oculus Rift. It is now available for PC on Steam.

Danfung Dennis is a documentary photographer and videographer. He directed the award-winning documentary Hell And Back Again and produced the 360 degree film Condition One.

Josh Raab is a contributor to TIME LightBox. Follow him on Instagram @instagraabit.


TIME fashion

How the Apple Watch Might Look if Reimagined by Fashion’s Top Designers

Imagine these on the catwalk

When the Apple Watch is released in early 2015, there will be many different colors, designs, and interfaces to choose from. Some buyers, however, will always want more.

Online fashion site High Snobiety commissioned designer Finz Lo to create concept art of how the watches might look if they were designed by renowned fashion houses.

The collection is inspired by the work of fashion heavyweights such as Alexander Wang, Chanel, Louie Vitton, Givenchy, and Maison Martin Margiela.

TIME fashion

Watch an Entire Fashion Show in 1 Minute

Filmed on an iPhone using Hyperlapse

At Jenny Packham’s show on Sept. 9 during New York Fashion Week, the lights were dazzling, the dresses elegant and the models calm and collected. However, the process that goes into it all moves at a breakneck pace.

TIME takes you behind the scenes of the making of the show — from setup to takedown. Watch the runway construction, with its meticulous lighting, and the backstage insanity as models go through makeup, hair and dress. Then, after the last walk, see it all deconstructed as quickly as it was built. The show was filmed on an iPhone using Hyperlapse, a new time-lapse app from Instagram. When all is said and done, you’ll see the whole show in a single minute.

TIME Follow Friday

#LightboxFF: Experience a Night at the Museum

TIME follows Instagram photographer Dave Krugman inside the American Museum of Natural History, his latest behind-the-scene tour at some of New York City’s largest museums

Welcome to this week’s edition of TIME LightBox Follow Friday, a series where we feature the work of photographers using Instagram in new, interesting and engaging ways. Each week we will introduce you to the person behind the feed through his or her pictures and an interview with the photographer.

This week #LightBoxFF features photographer Dave Krugman (@dave.krugman), formerly a freelance photographer and retoucher for Annie Leibovitz who collaborated earlier this month with the American Museum of Natural History (@amnh) and uses his Instagram presence to lead exclusive tours for some of New York City’s largest museums.


When New York City’s museums close for the day, Dave Krugman begins his. Trailed by a select crew of prolific Instagramers and PR specialists, they methodically photograph the spaces and artifacts, showcasing what makes the institutions unique. Then, they transfer the images from their DSLRs onto their phones and post them to Instagram, tagging the museums. The goal is simple: to drive traffic to the museum’s online profiles, building up their presence on Instagram.

 

Josh Raab for TIME
Josh Raab for TIME

Krugman’s first foray into Instagram-led tours happened a year ago when he convinced the Metropolitan Museum of Art to open up its galleries for him after normal opening hours. Accompanied by other Instagram photographers, they tagged their images with the hash tag #emptymet. The project proved to be hugely successful. “Before the project, the MET had a little shy of 4000 followers,” Krugman tells TIME. “Basically the project really put them on the map in the [photo] community. Instagram took notice because a lot of the people in the Instagram community were involved in it. As we repeated the project and through the museum’s own efforts, [they now have] over 200,000 followers.”

Aside from Instagram, the New York Times and Fortune Magazine featured #emptymet in their pages, propelling Krugman to the top of the New York City Instagram community with more than 100,000 followers.

 

Jose Silva @jnsilva for @AMNH
Jose Silva @jnsilva for @amnh

He has since led tours for the New York Public Library and the Intrepid Air & Space Museum. The American Museum of Natural History took notice, reaching out to Krugman for help in finding a voice on Instagram.

For Anne Canty, AMNH’s Senior Vice President of Communications and Marketing the Instagram tour is “for people that have never been here, and maybe don’t have the ability to come here. Hopefully it will be a way for them to appreciate interesting natural history content. Both content that’s timeless as well as showing how the museum changes.”

Krugman selected his team carefully, choosing top Instagrammers Jose Silva @jnsilva, Karim Mustafa @karim.mustafa, Sam Morrison @Sam the Cobra, and John Suarez @jm_suarez. Together they spent six hours touring the museum, photographing its main attractions as well as rooms that are off-limit to the public such as the ichthyology, mineralogy and entomology collections. The images will then be curated by the Museum’s public relations team and released over time on the museums feed @amnh.

Karim Mustafa @karim.mustafa for @amnh
Karim Mustafa @karim.mustafa for @amnh

Aside from exclusive access, Krugman was able to secure a budget for the project, something he wasn’t able to do in the past. “Instagram was very young when we started this project. Very very few brands or institutions were paying [Instagram] photographers. Now, I’m paying photographers, I’m paying myself. It’s actually becoming an incredible opportunity for paid work.”

For Krugman, this success is representative of a new golden age of photography, with Instagram helping to elevate smartphone photography. “When the printing press came out, it didn’t invent books but it democratized literacy,” he says. “When the iPhone came out, it didn’t invent the camera but it democratized visual literacy. I think some people view the phone as an assault on photography while it’s really not, it’s exactly the opposite. Everybody has a camera now, and if you have experience with something, you have a deeper appreciation for it.”

 

Josh Raab for TIME
Josh Raab for TIME

Dave Krugman is an Instagram Consultant. Follow him on Instagram @dave.krugman

Josh Raab is a contributor to TIME LightBox. Follow him on Instagram @instagraabit

Diane Tsai is an Associate Video Producer at TIME.com. Follow her on Instagram @tsaiclops


TIME photo essay

Photographer Captures Sweet Moments of Summer

Photographer Bryan Derballa captures moments that exist between the borders of childhood and adulthood with his considered, affectionate portraits of a summer getaway

Raised in North Carolina and educated in California, the Brooklyn-based photographer Bryan Derballa has an unwavering love for the outdoors. For the last four summers, he’s set aside his work in order to head into the country with his friends. For him, these journeys are essential to his livelihood. As he enters his thirties, they allow him to hang onto what he calls the “liminal state between youth and adulthood. It’s a period of uncertainty that occurs sometime after college but before homeownership, when friends become family and time becomes finite.”

This theme of chasing childhood translates directly into Derballa’s work. Images of diving into the sea, setting off fireworks, and cuddling on the beach illustrate the sweet moments of summer everyone wishes they had more of.

As the responsibilities of adulthood quickly replace the recklessness of adolescence, Derballa has become increasingly aware of the importance of holding onto the fleeting moments of adolescence. “Now, I’ve got real responsibilities and strict deadlines and client relationships to manage,” Derballa says. “I spend equal amounts of time looking at real estate properties online as I do watching skate videos on the Thrasher website.”

For him, both adulthood and his increasing successes are exciting, but there is also an inherent fear in growing up. “As we get older and inevitably jaded, the world loses its mystery,” he says. His images show this, succinctly capturing the final moments of youth.

Despite the fear and anxiety of living in the delicate space between youth and age, caution and danger, Derballa has found ways to deal with it. “The feeling I get just before jumping 60 feet into the bottom of a waterfall has no rational value in my adult life, but I live for it. I’m not sure how much longer I’ll be able to stare down mortality with the invincibility of youth, but I cherish all the remaining seconds that I can.”


Bryan Derballa is a documentary photographer and creator of the photo blog Lovebryan. He was recently selected as one of PDN 30’s emerging photographers of 2014.

Josh Raab is a contributor to TIME LightBox. Follow him on Instagram @instagraabit


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