TIME Behind the Photos

See the Most Dramatic Rescue From the Nepal Earthquake

A man was pulled from the rubble alive in Kathmandu after a 7.8-magnitude quake struck on Saturday

Photojournalist Narendra Shrestha was at home on Saturday when he felt the tremors of a 7.8-magnitude earthquake that struck central Nepal, killing more than 1130 people.

“I thought I was going to die,” Shrestha tells TIME. “It was horrifying. How did I get out of this? This is my lucky day.”

As soon as the tremors began, his daughter started crying—she did not want him to leave their newly built home, which was left intact. But, Shrestha said to himself, “I should capture this. This is my job”

Shrestha, 40, a staff photographer for the European Pressphoto Agency based in Kathmandu, has worked in the region and across the world for 17 years.

Shrestha was stunned by the devastation after the quake. “Everybody is in shock,” he said.

Not far from his home in Thamel, the main tourist hub in Kathmandu, he came across a hotel under construction. An old home next to the hotel had collapsed, trapping an undetermined number of people. Shrestha estimated 40 construction workers were on site, actively searching for people who were trapped, when they found a man.

“All you could see was his head,” he said. “The rest of his body was buried.”

As they worked to uncover him it was apparent he was still alive.

With dust still in the air and a flurry of rescue workers and volunteers scrambling to find survivors, Shrestha captured the scenes of chaos before returning to his office to transmit his photos, as aftershocks continued to be felt across the region.

Shrestha also checked on his father—who has lived through numerous earthquakes. “He’s never seen anything like this,” he said

As night approached in Kathmandu, people were still in shock, he added. “Nobody is going to sleep in their homes tonight. I’m going to move my family outside. I’m just grateful my family is OK.”

TIME A Year In Space

Watch NASA’s Spectacular First GoPro Video Captured on a Spacewalk

"Video like this is the whole reason we built the camera"

GoPro’s community of thrill seekers might have been upstaged permanently by a NASA astronaut who captured stunning footage of a spacewalk using a high definition camera for the very first time.

NASA astronaut Terry Virts strapped on the point-of-view camera last February before venturing out of the International Space Station (ISS) to do some exterior housekeeping on the berthing docks. He and astronaut Barry Wilmore were reconfiguring the ports for the upcoming arrival of commercial crews.

Along the way, they captured two stunning videos, one showing the ISS’ incomparable views of earth and the other floating beneath the station’s underbelly, bristling with panels, cables and dishes.

“This was the first time an astronaut captured HD video of a spacewalk while outside,” NASA public affairs officer Dan Huot told TIME. The GoPro helmet camera used features much higher resolution than the astronauts’ current helmet-cams. “They are small, simple and have great quality,” he said.

The camera used during the space-walk works much like the kind of GoPro you can buy here on Earth, only with a one-touch power up and record function. “This makes it much easier to execute while wearing large gloves,” Huot added.

The footage is quieter and slower than the typical GoPro images of say, roof jumpers or a great white shark lunging toward the camera. But then it’s hard to top the hypnotic movement of a camera in zero gravity, where even a belt buckle, floating into the frame, can be fascinating to watch.

“Video like this is the whole reason we built the camera,” Rick Loughery, a spokesperson for GoPro, said. “To be able to share that perspective with the world.”

Read next: A Year in Space

TIME weather

‘Snow Squall’ Causes New Year’s Day Pileup on Canadian Highway

Dozens of vehicles were involved in a series of collisions on a highway in Ontario

This video, captured by Mark Jesley en route from Toronto to Montreal Thursday, shows the aftermath of several multi-vehicle accidents caused by slippery road conditions across Canada.

“Within two minutes we saw a transport hit another car that was in front of us,” Jesley told TIME. The Ontario Provincial Police confirmed to The Weather Channel that “dozens of vehicles” were involved in a series of collisions on Highway 401 near Odessa, Ontario, on New Year’s Day.

“A lot of the cars around us didn’t have their lights turned on,” Jesley said. “The fact that we had ours on was at least partially to play that we didn’t get rear ended.”

An Ontario Provincial Police spokesperson told time that officers were still on the road following the crash, which occurred around 12 p.m. ET.

A public weather alert had been issued Thursday for snow squalls in the area.

TIME space

A Satellite Took Pictures of Another Satellite and Now It’s a GIF

The launch of DigitalGlobe's WorldView-3 is seen from Vandenberg Air Force Base on Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014.
DigitalGlobe The launch of DigitalGlobe's WorldView-3 is seen from Vandenberg Air Force Base on Aug. 13, 2014.

Well, this is pretty meta

A series of pictures provided to TIME by DigitalGlobe shows what kind of fun you can have when you own multiple satellites.

The images captured the launch of the company’s newest satellite launching into orbit this past Wednesday.

The new WorldView-3 satellite, worth roughly a half-billion dollars and about the size of a small RV, became the highest-resolution commercial satellite in space. DigitalGlobe, the company that funded its manufacture, said it will offer 31-centimeter resolution, much clearer than the current 50-cm aboard the WorldView-2.

Technology aboard the new satellite will, among other things, supply Google Maps with higher resolution photos for “satellite view.”

The satellite that shot the photos was flying at an altitude of over 300 miles, according to DigitalGlobe, and orbiting at a speed of 17,000 mph.

Video of the launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California can be seen below.

TIME space

Watch a High-Tech Satellite Get Launched Into Space

Updated 2:48 p.m. ET

A new satellite launched Wednesday is expected to provide imagery of Earth that is nearly 40% sharper than what’s currently available.

The new WorldView-3 satellite, worth a half-billion dollars and about the size of a small RV, will become the highest-resolution commercial satellite in space. DigitalGlobe, the company that funded its manufacture, said it will offer 31-centimeter resolution, much clearer than the current 50-cm aboard the WorldView-2.

That will give the satellite the ability to see through clouds and certain precipitation, the company added, potentially leading to shorter wait times for making and receiving images.

The U.S. government is DigitalGlobe’s No. 1 customer, but the general public is likely to benefit from its orbit. Technology aboard the satellite will, among other things, supply Google Maps with higher resolution photos for “satellite view” and should be able to help people like first-responders, who are trying to identify a wildfire’s origin or researchers who, using DigitalGlobe’s 10-year archive, are looking into crops at risk of disease or drought.

The launch took place at 2:30 p.m. E.T., from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

TIME celebrities

Here’s Footage From Lauren Bacall’s Wedding to Humphrey Bogart

That is one sexy cake cutting

This footage from Paramount pictures, shot on May 21, 1945, shows 20-year-old Lauren Bacall getting married to 45-year-old Humphrey Bogart, at a farmhouse in Lucas, Ohio. They look pretty darn in love.

TIME Music

See Coachella Through the Eyes of Google Glass

See the famed California music fest from a new angle

Jonathan D. Woods, TIME’s Senior Editor for Photo & Interactive, spent a weekend at Coachella. Here’s an intimate firsthand look at how he saw the music festival through a unique lens: Google Glass.

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