TIME Crime

Slender Man Stabbing Suspect Deemed Incompetent for Trial

Enthusiasts Enjoy Comic Con As It Opens In London
Yasmin Ouard poses as Slenderman from the series Mobile Hornets ahead of the MCM London Comic Con Expo Dan Kitwood—Getty Images

A 12-year-old suspect in the stabbing linked to the fictional online character reportedly believes she has Vulcan Mind control

A Wisconsin circuit court judge ruled Friday that one of the two 12-year old girls charged with stabbing a classmate in Wisconsin is incompetent to stand trial for attempted homicide.

This May, two girls allegedly stabbed their classmate during a sleepover to prove their loyalty to the popular online fictional character Slender Man. The creepy figure has been linked to three separate acts of violence, according to ABC News.

Wisconsin law requires any person age 10 and over to be charged as an adult for severe crimes. In this case, the victim was allegedly stabbed 19 times in a nearby woods, with the blade narrowly missing an main artery near her heart. She managed to crawl out of the woods and was found by a passing biker.

Psychologist Brooke Lundbohm of the Wisconsin Forensic Unit analyzed the suspect in question this June. According to the Journal Sentinal, Lundbohm said the 12-year old claimed she could hear and see things like unicorns, the Slender Man and the Harry Potter character Voldemort. Psychiatrist Kenneth Robbins testified that the suspect believes she has Vulcan mind control and is more concerned with angering Slender Man than the prospect of a long prison sentence.

The defendant’s attorneys hope to move the case from adult to juvenile court, where the maximum sentence would be 25 years.

[Journal-Sentinal]

TIME Family

Sisters Make You Popular, According to Baboon Study

Christian Heinrich—Getty Images/Imagebroker
Yellow Baboons with babys sitting on a trunk, Moremi Nationalpark in Botswana, Africa. Christian Heinrich—Getty Images/Imagebroker

Mothers pass their high ranks onto their daughters, and sisters help give that a boost

A study of dominance in female baboons reveals two keys to a high rank in primate society: a close bond with your mother and a circle of supportive sisters.

Duke University biology professor Susan Alberts and her colleagues studied a population of yellow baboons in Kenya, observing the rise and fall of females on the baboon social ladder.

“Daughters of high-ranking females generally mature more quickly, produce more offspring, and have better access to food and mates. It’s like being born with a silver spoon in your mouth,” said Alberts.

Baboon mothers often assist their daughters in competition for food and mates, helping establish their daughters’ position in the animal kingdom.

Researchers also discovered the power of sisterhood among baboons; female’s with many sisters were more likely to reach the rank of their mothers.

Sisters are willing to gang up on rival families in order to boost their siblings’ rank. But when it came to competition within the family, that support drifted away; baboon sisters helped each other only as long as their own rank wasn’t in jeopardy.

The study, published in August’s issue of Animal Behaviour, suggests that the secret to the Kardashian family’s popularity might not be its reality show, but rather sisterhood. And that baboon theory could also explain why Kim is always the queen bee.

TIME Marvel

Guardians of the Galaxy Has Already Made More Than $11 Million

Guardians of the Galaxy 2014
Marvel

Marvel unleashes its new summer blockbuster

Updated August 1 at 5:12 p.m. ET

Guardians of the Galaxy earned $11.2 million in late-night screenings on Thursday, Variety reports, for the year’s largest preview opening, and is on track to rake in an estimated $90 million from weekend showings, according to Friday estimates.

The comic book adaption will have the largest screening in August history—showing at 4,080 threatres on Friday. It surpassed recent forecasts that predicted $70 million in weekend earnings, and will unseat previous August record holder, The Bourne Ultimatum ($69.3 million).

Amidst the popularity of Marvel’s The Avengers and its prequel and sequel films, it’s no surprise that this intergalactic team is gaining fans. Actor Chris Pratt—among the only human characters in the film—is flanked by a quirky talking raccoon, a CGI tree, a hulk-ish green brute and a female alien assassin.

The film already boasts a 91% critic rating on Rotten Tomatoes — read TIME’s review by Richard Corliss here.

 

TIME India

At Least 60 Dead, Scores Missing in India Landslide

Eight people have been rescued so far

Search teams continue to dig through the mud from a landslide that buried a village in western India on Wednesday as the death toll has reached 66, officials said Friday.

The evening landslide crashed into the small village of Malin, taking its approximately 150 residents by surprise, the BBC reported. Workers have managed to reach the central part of the village, but no survivors have been recovered in the past 48 hours.

The torrential rain that caused the disaster continues to hamper rescue efforts, said officials, despite the attempts of the 250 disaster response workers and 100 ambulances on the scene. The eight villagers thus far rescued are receiving treatment at a government hospital 60 kilometers away.

India’s monsoon season runs from June to September.

[BBC]

TIME celebrity

Katy Perry Doesn’t ‘Need A Dude’ to Have a Baby

Rolling Stone

The pop icon opens up to Rolling Stone

Pop star Katy Perry talked babies and cultural appropriation for Rolling Stone’s new cover story.

The star says she’s interested in having a child someday, but does not need society to tell her how to do it. In other words: a man is not key to Perry’s baby plans.

“I don’t need a dude,” said Perry. She cited friends and celebrity couple Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka,”I mean, Neil and David, their twins are beautiful. It’s 2014! We are living in the future; we don’t need anything. I don’t think I’ll have to, but we’ll see. I’m not anti-men. I love men. But there is an option if someone doesn’t present himself.”

Perry also commented on criticism about several aspects of her stage show, including a geisha-inspired American Music Award performance and dancers dressed as mummies with big, fake butts on her current tour. But Perry says none of the costumes are meant to play up racism and cultural stereotypes.

“Those girls aren’t African-American,” she told Rolling Stone. “But it’s actually a representation of our culture wanting to be plastic, and that’s why there’s bandages and it’s mummies. I thought that would really correlate well together… It came from an honest place.”

But for now, Katy Perry is just going to focus on making music.

 

TIME movies

Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar: Watch the New Trailer

Interstellar will launch in theaters this November

+ READ ARTICLE

A new trailer for Christopher Nolan’s upcoming deep-space epic, Interstellar, was released Wednesday.

The Batman director sends actor Matthew McConaughey, accompanied by Anne Hathaway, on a space mission to explore a newly discovered wormhole and to “surpass the limitations on human space travel.”

This new trailer offers more than sci-fi action scenes among the stars — the clip shows the movie’s soft side, focusing mainly on McConaughey’s relationship with his daughter, played by Twilight actor Mackenzie Foy. Actors aside — Michael Caine returns with Hathaway — the trailer has an eerie resemblance to the Dark Knight trilogy.

TIME Diet/Nutrition

Decoding Menus Can Help You Slim Down

Menu
Getty Images

Menu design can affect your dietary habits

Diners beware—the items in flashy fonts and bolded lettering are not always the best choice for your health. A new study released this month shows that the dishes we order at restaurants have less to do with our preferences and more to do with a menu’s description and design.

The Cornell study—published in the International Journal of Hospitality Management—examined 217 menus and the meal choices of 300 diners. Two factors impact our decisions, say the researchers: how food is presented on the menu and how we imagine our food will taste.

Tantalizing descriptions and highlighted fonts pull diners into certain items on a menu. “In most cases, these are the least healthy items on the menu,” said Brian Wansink in a statement, the study’s lead author and author of Slim by Design: Mindless Eating Solutions for Everyday Life.

Wansink and his co-author Katie Love altered the names of some menu items, changing things like “seafood filet” to “Succulent Italian Seafood Filet” and “red beans and rice” to “Cajun Red Beans and Rice.” And when they did? Sales of these menu items increased by 28%. On average, diners were willing to pay 12% more for foods with descriptive, enticing names.

Wansink says the secret to healthy dining is talking to your server. “Ask ‘What are your two or three lighter entrées that get the most compliments?’ or ‘What’s the best thing on the menu if a person wants a light dinner?’”

If you are not cooking at home, decoding the restaurant menu may be the ticket to not spoiling your diet when you dine out.

TIME royals

Jumping in Heels: Kate Middleton’s Newest Skill

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge plays the South African game of Three Tins during a visit to the Commonwealth Games Village in Glasgow, Scotland on July 29, 2014 .
Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge plays the South African game of Three Tins during a visit to the Commonwealth Games Village in Glasgow, Scotland on July 29, 2014 . Danny Lawson—WPA Pool/Getty Images

A performance fit for a Queen

Most avoid athletic endeavors while in heels, but not Kate Middleton—The Duchess of Cambridge showed off her jumping skills in wedges on Tuesday at the Glasgow Commonwealth Games.

Prince William and Kate showed their support at the athletes’ village, said the Daily Mail, partaking in festivities including ‘three tins’, a jumping game requiring players to hop over three stacked tins.

Kate Middleton—inspiring wedged athletes everywhere.

 

 

 

 

 

TIME health

NCAA Proposes $70M Concussion Fund To Settle Lawsuit

NCAA President Mark Emmert News Conference
NCAA President Mark Emmert speaks to the media during a press conference at AT&T Stadium on April 6, 2014 in Arlington, Texas. Jamie Squire—Getty Images

The settlement includes funding for testing current and former college athletes

The National Collegiate Athletic Association will pay $70 million for concussion testing as part of a proposed settlement over an ongoing head-injury lawsuit, the organization announced Tuesday. The money would pay for symptom identification for current and former college athletes.

If accepted, the proposed deal, which would also offer $5 million for concussion research, would put an end to an ongoing class-action lawsuit facing the NCAA in federal court. According to the plaintiffs in that case, a 2010 NCAA internal study showed that almost half of college trainers put athletes with signs of concussions back on the field. The suit has been riding a wave of accusations that the NCAA and college teams across the country have put players at risk of brain injuries.

“Student-athletes — not just football players — have dropped out of school and suffered huge long-term symptoms because of brain injuries,” the lead plaintiff’s lawyer, Steve Berman, told The New York Times. “Anything we can do to enhance concussion management is a very important day for student-athletes.”

The settlement would affect men and women across all NCAA divisions. In addition to football, ice hockey and soccer squads, the settlement also affects basketball, wrestling, field hockey and lacrosse teams. All current and former athletes in the NCAA would be eligible for concussion screening and possible damage claims under the proposal.

As part of the deal, college athletes will be required to take a baseline neurological test at the beginning of each year, which will help doctors monitor the effects of potential concussions during the season. Concussion education will also be required for coaches and athletes.

“We have been and will continue to be committed to student-athlete safety, which is one of the NCAA’s foundational principles,” said NCAA Chief Medical Officer Brian Hainline in a statement. “Medical knowledge of concussions will continue to grow, and consensus about diagnosis, treatment and management of concussions by the medical community will continue to evolve. This agreement’s proactive measures will ensure student-athletes have access to high quality medical care by physicians with experience in the diagnosis, treatment and management of concussions.”

TIME Science

2 New Holes Mysteriously Appear in Siberia

More holes are discovered in Siberia, leaving scientist puzzled

+ READ ARTICLE

Two new mysterious holes have appeared in the Siberian permafrost, the Siberian Times reports—just two weeks after the first crater appeared in the northern Yamal peninsula.

The second hole, some 15 meters wide, was found a few hundred kilometers away from the first, also in the Yamal peninsula. Like the first, the second hole has piles of dirt surrounding the perimeter, indicating an excavation or explosion. However, scientists have yet to confirm what’s causing the strange phenomena. Some believe they’re a result of meteorite impacts, while others look towards natural gas explosions under earth’s surface.

Mikhail Lapsui, a deputy of the regional parliament, inspected the second hole, reports the Siberian Times, while also gathering information from locals.

“According to local residents, the hole formed on 27 September 2013,” Lapsui told the Times. “Observers give several versions. According to the first, initially at the place was smoking, and then there was a bright flash. In the second version, a celestial body fell there.”

Reindeer herders stumbled upon the third crater alongside a pasture trail in the Taymyr peninsula to the east of Yamal. Scientists estimate that hole to be 60 to 100 meters deep with a diameter of 4 meters.

The two new holes will undergo investigations. The first hole—70 meters deep—revealed an ice-covered lake at the bottom.

[Siberian Times]

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