TIME Food & Drink

7 Wines to Pair With Your Favorite Halloween Candy

Assortment of candy
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Here's what to eat and drink on October 31

This article originally appeared on Food & Wine.

One of the worst parts about being an adult is that, unless you want a weird neighborhood reputation, you can’t go trick-or-treating anymore. But one of the best parts about being an adult is that you can buy as much candy as you want and don’t have to wait for your parents to meter it out to you. Not only that, but now you can also drink while you eat it. To help us choose appropriate wines, we enlisted Alpana Singh, owner of the Boarding House in Chicago, judge on Food Network’s Food Truck Faceoff and the youngest woman to ever become a master sommelier (she was 23). Here are her recommendations for what to pair with whatever your favorite candy might be (NO CANDY CORN).

1. Sour Patch Kids and 2012 Hogue Late Harvest Riesling, Washington State ($9):

A mouth-puckering Riesling with sweet and sour notes of green apples, apricots and honey make for a seamless match with Sour Patch Kids.

2. Laffy Taffy and 2013 Quady Electra Moscato, California ($11):

Be it banana, green apple, watermelon or strawberry taffy, this versatile, slightly sparkling dessert wine with flavors of apricots, honey and green apples is sure to out a smile on your face.

3. Butterfinger and Pellegrino Sweet Marsala, Italy ($13):

Marsala isn’t just for making chicken. Enjoy the sweet raisin flavors with notes of toffee and buttered nuts with the slight salty and nutty flavors of Butterfinger candy.

4. Nerds and Dr. L Sparkling Riesling, Germany ($13):

Nerds are inherently sour and then sweet which perfectly describes this sparkling wine. The bubbles also act as a palate cleanser to get you ready for your next bite.

5. Mr. Goodbar and Sandeman Tawny Port, Portugal ($15):

Milk chocolate and roasted peanut flavors meld beautifully with the caramel, raisin, toffee and nutty notes of this delightful Port.

6. Nestle Crunch and 2012 Dashe Late Harvest Zinfandel, Dry Creek Valley ($24):

Sweet raspberry and strawberry flavors really bring out the crunchy milk chocolate goodness.

7. Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups and Emilio Lustau Solera Sherry, Spain ($37):

The raisin, caramel and almond flavors enhance the creamy peanut butter filling.

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TIME Food & Drink

15 Lessons from 20 Years of the French Laundry

Thomas Keller at The French Laundry
Thomas Keller at The French Laundry in 2004 Hoberman Collection—UIG/Getty Images

Chefs remember the wisdom they gained working for Thomas Keller

In honor of the 20th anniversary of Thomas Keller’s legendary Napa restaurant, The French Laundry, Food & Wine’s Kate Krader and Chelsea Morse have collected reminiscences and lessons from some of the chefs who worship him. Here are a few of his teachings.

Tasting Vinegar

In the early days of The French Laundry, Thomas made his own red wine vinegar. One afternoon, he was tasting it to make sure it was ready for bottling and release. I watched as he dipped a sugar cube into a bowl of vinegar and then sucked on it. When I asked what he was doing, he said, pretty matter-of-factly, “That’s how you should taste vinegar”—the sweetness of the sugar softens the vinegar’s edge. It was the first time I’d seen someone taste vinegar, much less use that method, so I tried it. And it worked. —Eric Ziebold, Cityzen, Washington, DC

Searing Fish

At The Laundry, I learned to wait until a pan is very hot before adding oil—it should be so hot that a little white smoke comes off the oil when you pour it in. The smoke means you are ready to sear and will get a nice crust on fish. I saw this technique when I worked on the garde-manger station, watching chef Keller train the new fish cooks. I learned to always pay attention to what others were being taught: Sometimes great lessons aren’t directed specifically at you. —Timothy Hollingsworth, Restaurant at the Broad (opening 2015), Los Angeles

Understanding Hospitality

On the last day of my stage, Chef told me to hand him my apron. I thought I was in trouble. He folded it perfectly and then escorted me to his office, where a place setting was arranged at his desk for dinner. The food was perfect, but more than that, the sense of hospitality was overwhelming. I have hesitated to go back to eat at TFL since then because this was one of the most important meals of my life—one that can never be topped. —Michael Voltaggio, ink., Los Angeles

READ THE FULL LIST HERE

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