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This App Is Supposed to Prevent You from Sending Drunk Tweets

bottles of alcohol
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You have to input how many hours you plan to be drunk—between one and ten

This article originally appeared on Food & Wine.

A drunk text can wreak havoc on a single relationship, but a drunken social media post can ruin hundreds of connections (maybe even thousands if you’re particularly popular) with just a tap on your touchscreen. Now there’s an app to stop you from becoming an inebriated social media nightmare. Drunk Message Blocker will completely shut down your access to social media. No Facebook, no Twitter, no Instagram, no Snapchat. It’s not the first app designed to protect the drunk smartphone user, but what sets it apart is that it’s the first one to stop you from using your social networks. It’s also incredibly strict. Even if you delete the app from your phone you still aren’t going to be able to put up that embarrassing picture on Facebook.

As with other apps designed to avoid drunken mistakes you’ll later regret, this one does require some advanced planning. You have to input how many hours you plan to be drunk—between one and ten (if you’re going to be drunk for ten hours you should probably just leave your phone at home because there is a 100 percent chance you’re going to lose it). But until your phone can detect your blood-alcohol level through your skin, there will always be a manual component. Still, an app that can keep you from messing up your life in 140 characters is something we could all use from time to time.

Drunk Message Blocker is free in the Google Play store.

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This Food Can Glow in the Dark

Happy Halloween!

This article originally appeared on Food & Wine.

A transcontinental couple is changing the reputation of glowing food, proving that it doesn’t have to be radioactive, third-arm inducing, dangerous fare. And they’ve come up with the best use for a blacklight that we haven’t seen since college. For their blog Luma Bites, Minnesota-based Steven Johnson and his Croatian chef-fiancée Martina Županić use ordinary ingredients that just happen to give off an eerie glow under ultra-violet light. One classic example is to make Jell-O with tonic in place of water. The quinine in tonic water lends its bitter taste and glows icy blue under black light. But Martina never much cared for Jell-O so she developed a whole array of dishes that glow in unnatural colors thanks to naturally fluorescing compounds occurring in ingredients like mustard, honey and some secret oil mixtures she’s keeping to herself. Steven and Martina dream of opening a glow-in-the-dark restaurant , but until then you can just enjoy looking at these spooky crepes, sushi and more.

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The 5 Best NHL Arenas for Food

An overall view of the interior of the arena at the NHL season opener at Staples Center on October 8, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.
An overall view of the interior of the arena at the NHL season opener at Staples Center on October 8, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. Stephen Dunn—Getty Images

Here are the best places in the NHL to pound on the glass and have a bite to eat

This article originally appeared on Food & Wine.

It’s hockey season. Oh you didn’t know? That’s because hockey is usually degraded as the least major of the major American sports. Heck, at this point Nascar and professional wrestling get more love than hockey. But we find that exceedingly unfair. Hockey is faster than football, takes as much skill as baseball and has at least as many missing teeth as professional wrestling. NHL arenas also offer some great food for hungry fans. Here are the best places in the NHL to pound on the glass and have a bite to eat.

1. Bridgestone Arena, Home of the Nashville Predators

There’s not much in the way of actual ice and snow in Nashville, but the city still scored a hockey team in 1998. Predators’ fans can eat what is most likely the best if not the only chicken-and-waffles in all of professional sports. And the Nashville Hot Chicken sandwich is another local pick that’s worth the wait.

2. Rogers Arena, Home of the Vancouver Canucks

This year the Canucks have introduced lobster rolls and a dozen variations on stadium tube steaks, including a “perogy dog” topped with cheese and potato perogies and sauerkraut and a croque monsieur dog topped with ham and gruyere. They’ll also pour you a Negroni right from a concession stand. Not a bad way alternative to the $8 swill beer most arenas offer.

3. The Staples Center, Home of the L.A. Kings

Nachos and hot dogs are available, but a lot of the menu options at the home of the defending Stanley Cup champions read fit L.A.’s health conscious stereotype: roasted beet salad, sesame-crusted tuna, even gluten-free beer. The big winner here though is the sushi that’s made fresh at every game.

4. Nationwide Arena, Home of the Columbus Blue Jackets

Columbus, Ohio is on this list for one reason and it ain’t fancy. The arena here serves the ultimate “drunk at the stadium” food. The Dancing Kevin sandwich is named after this guy, Dancing Kevin. And like him it is a fantastically oversized piece of work. A pork bomb on a pretzel bun, the sandwich features ham, pulled pork and bacon topped with mozzarella sticks.

5. Bell Centre, Home of the Montreal Canadians;

Montreal takes a few things very seriously: French, food and hockey. The latter two are on display at the Bell Centre, which sells smoked meat sandwiches from Lesters Deli, which has been cranking out delicious, fatty sandwiches in Montreal for over 60 years. And because this is Canada, expect mountains of poutine.

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The Deep-Fried Candy Corn Recipe Your Body Was Hoping You’d Never Find

Amy Erickson

This article originally appeared on Food & Wine.

Here’s a fun trick you can play on attendees’ coronary health at your upcoming Halloween party: Give ‘em deep-friend candy corn.

The recipe comes from one of our favorite fryers of things, Amy over at the blog Oh Bite It and the concoction is surprisingly simple. You can whip up these little sugar bombs with nothing more than candy corn, a roll of Pillsbury Seamless Crescent Dough and a little touch of powdered sugar “for dusting.”

Plus, you know, a giant pan full of artery clogging frying oil.

If any candy could use some help, it’s candy corn and frying it is definitely the way to go. As Amy points out on the site, each one contains a “warm, sweet and slightly chewy colorful Nougat that has transformed into just a shadow of that seasonal, sad, tooth-buster of a treat it used to be!”

Plus, they certainly beat the Necco Wafer crusted pumpkin seeds I was going to serve at my party.

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7 Wines to Pair With Your Favorite Halloween Candy

Assortment of candy
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Here's what to eat and drink on October 31

This article originally appeared on Food & Wine.

One of the worst parts about being an adult is that, unless you want a weird neighborhood reputation, you can’t go trick-or-treating anymore. But one of the best parts about being an adult is that you can buy as much candy as you want and don’t have to wait for your parents to meter it out to you. Not only that, but now you can also drink while you eat it. To help us choose appropriate wines, we enlisted Alpana Singh, owner of the Boarding House in Chicago, judge on Food Network’s Food Truck Faceoff and the youngest woman to ever become a master sommelier (she was 23). Here are her recommendations for what to pair with whatever your favorite candy might be (NO CANDY CORN).

1. Sour Patch Kids and 2012 Hogue Late Harvest Riesling, Washington State ($9):

A mouth-puckering Riesling with sweet and sour notes of green apples, apricots and honey make for a seamless match with Sour Patch Kids.

2. Laffy Taffy and 2013 Quady Electra Moscato, California ($11):

Be it banana, green apple, watermelon or strawberry taffy, this versatile, slightly sparkling dessert wine with flavors of apricots, honey and green apples is sure to out a smile on your face.

3. Butterfinger and Pellegrino Sweet Marsala, Italy ($13):

Marsala isn’t just for making chicken. Enjoy the sweet raisin flavors with notes of toffee and buttered nuts with the slight salty and nutty flavors of Butterfinger candy.

4. Nerds and Dr. L Sparkling Riesling, Germany ($13):

Nerds are inherently sour and then sweet which perfectly describes this sparkling wine. The bubbles also act as a palate cleanser to get you ready for your next bite.

5. Mr. Goodbar and Sandeman Tawny Port, Portugal ($15):

Milk chocolate and roasted peanut flavors meld beautifully with the caramel, raisin, toffee and nutty notes of this delightful Port.

6. Nestle Crunch and 2012 Dashe Late Harvest Zinfandel, Dry Creek Valley ($24):

Sweet raspberry and strawberry flavors really bring out the crunchy milk chocolate goodness.

7. Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups and Emilio Lustau Solera Sherry, Spain ($37):

The raisin, caramel and almond flavors enhance the creamy peanut butter filling.

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15 Lessons from 20 Years of the French Laundry

Thomas Keller at The French Laundry
Thomas Keller at The French Laundry in 2004 Hoberman Collection—UIG/Getty Images

Chefs remember the wisdom they gained working for Thomas Keller

In honor of the 20th anniversary of Thomas Keller’s legendary Napa restaurant, The French Laundry, Food & Wine’s Kate Krader and Chelsea Morse have collected reminiscences and lessons from some of the chefs who worship him. Here are a few of his teachings.

Tasting Vinegar

In the early days of The French Laundry, Thomas made his own red wine vinegar. One afternoon, he was tasting it to make sure it was ready for bottling and release. I watched as he dipped a sugar cube into a bowl of vinegar and then sucked on it. When I asked what he was doing, he said, pretty matter-of-factly, “That’s how you should taste vinegar”—the sweetness of the sugar softens the vinegar’s edge. It was the first time I’d seen someone taste vinegar, much less use that method, so I tried it. And it worked. —Eric Ziebold, Cityzen, Washington, DC

Searing Fish

At The Laundry, I learned to wait until a pan is very hot before adding oil—it should be so hot that a little white smoke comes off the oil when you pour it in. The smoke means you are ready to sear and will get a nice crust on fish. I saw this technique when I worked on the garde-manger station, watching chef Keller train the new fish cooks. I learned to always pay attention to what others were being taught: Sometimes great lessons aren’t directed specifically at you. —Timothy Hollingsworth, Restaurant at the Broad (opening 2015), Los Angeles

Understanding Hospitality

On the last day of my stage, Chef told me to hand him my apron. I thought I was in trouble. He folded it perfectly and then escorted me to his office, where a place setting was arranged at his desk for dinner. The food was perfect, but more than that, the sense of hospitality was overwhelming. I have hesitated to go back to eat at TFL since then because this was one of the most important meals of my life—one that can never be topped. —Michael Voltaggio, ink., Los Angeles

READ THE FULL LIST HERE

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