TIME Television

Anne of Green Gables Star Jonathan Crombie Dead at 48

Ahmanson Theatre Opening Performance Of "The Drowsy Chaperone"
Ryan Miller—Getty Images Jonathan Crombie during the party for the opening night performance of "The Drowsy Chaperone" held at the CTG Ahmanson Theatre on July 9, 2008 in Los Angeles.

The actor was best known for his role as Gilbert Blythe

Jonathan Crombie, the actor who played Gilbert Blythe in the CBC miniseries Anne of Green Gables, has died. He was 48.

His sister Carrie Crombie told CBC News that her brother died of brain hemorrhage in New York City on April 15.

Crombie’s best-known role was as Gilbert Blythe, the love interest and boy next door in the Anne of Green Gables TV movies. Cast in the first film at the age of 17, Crombie beat out many actors including Jason Priestley. Crombie was also the son of David Crombie, the mayor of Toronto from 1972 to 1978.

“He was funny, he was sweet, he loved acting, he loved comedy and singing and dancing. As a little kid, he just loved Broadway shows and all of that kind of stuff and would sing and dance in the living room,” his sister said.

TIME england

Titanic Deckchair Sells for 100,000 Pounds at Auction

MAHOGANY DECK CHAIR RECOVERED FROM TITANIC IS SEEN IN THE MARITIME MUSEUM OF THE ATLANTIC IN HALIFAX
Paul Darrow—Reuters /Landov A mahogany deck chair from the Titanic recovered by the crew aboard the CS Minia is seen in the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic in Halifax, UK, January 27, 2012.

A crew dispatched to gather bodies from the water found the chair in 1912

A deckchair that was pulled from the wreckage of the Titanic more than a century ago has found a new home.

The chair was sold at an auction in England on Saturday, fetching just over 100,000 pounds including taxes and fees, or nearly $150,000, a representative of the Wiltshire auction house told TIME.

The chair sat on the first-class deck of the luxury ship that sank after hitting an iceberg in 1912, killing 1,500 people.

It was discovered floating on the surface of the ocean by a crew dispatched to recover bodies from the wreckage in 1912, the Guardian reports. The chair originally belonged to a member of that crew, and then to an English Titanic collector who owned it for the last 15 years and used it as a display item in his home.

It was sold by auctioneer Henry Aldridge and Son to an unnamed collector in the U.K.

 

TIME health

Meet the Utah Teen Who Is Allergic to Water

Only 50 cases of the condition have been documented worldwide

Ever since she was a little girl, Utah teen Alexandra Allen has broken out in hives every time her skin was exposed to water.

In 2013, her family discovered that her condition was most likely aquagenic urticarial, an allergy to water when it comes in contact with the skin. There are only 50 cases documented in medical journals worldwide.

To avoid water exposure, Allen takes five-minute cold showers twice a week, cut her hair short and became a vegetarian so her body would produce less oil.

Read more at People.com.

TIME animals

These Endangered Penguins Are Getting ‘Honeymoon Suites’

Biologists hope privacy will encourage endangered African penguins to breed

Things are about to get a little racy between the animals at the New England Aquarium.

Aquarium experts are building “honeymoon suites” for eight pairs of endangered African penguins, as a way of encouraging them to breed more chicks, the Associated Press reports. The aquarium hopes to grow the population of the birds, which are expected to be extinct in the wild by 2025.

The honeymoon suites will be plastic igloo-like homes and private nooks built off of the main exhibit to protect the penguins’ modesty from the prying eyes of the aquarium’s visitors.

 

TIME Companies

Alfred Taubman, Inventor of Indoor Shopping Malls, Dies at 91

Al Taubman
Carlos Osorio—AP This Oct. 10, 2008 photo shows shopping mall mogul A. Alfred Taubman in Waterford Township, Mich.

He capitalized on the trend of Americans moving to the suburbs in the 1950s

Alfred Taubman, a real estate developer who invented the concept of indoor suburban shopping malls, has died at 91.

His son, Robert Taubman, the chairman of his father’s company, shared the news on Friday.

“He was so proud of what this wonderful company he founded 65 years ago has accomplished,” Robert Taubman said in a message to the company’s employees. “Tonight, after dinner in his home, a heart attack took him from us, ending what was a full, extraordinary life that touched so many people in so many wonderful ways around the world.”

Alfred Taubman was born to German Jewish immigrants in Michigan in 1924, CNN reports. When he noticed in the 1950s that Americans were moving to the suburbs, he thought they would need centralized places to shop. It was a brilliant innovation. In 2015, Forbes put his net worth at $3.1 billion.

But Taubman’s business life was not always rosy. He bought Sotheby’s auction house in 1983 and was sent to jail for nine months in 2002 after he was convicted of conspiring with Christie’s to fix auction house commission rates. He maintained his innocence.

TIME Environment

Millions of Jellyfish Invade Pacific Northwest Beaches

JELLYFISH BOUNTY
Kathy Quigg—AP Alan Rammer of the Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife's marine conservation and education division, holds a handful of the blue-hued velella jellyfish in Ocean City, Wash., on May 14, 2004.

Jellyfish are washing up on shore in Oregon and Washington

Beach-goers beware.

Millions of jellyfish are washing up on the shores of beaches in Washington and Oregon, CNN reports.

It is not unusual for the bluish-purple species called Velella velalla to turn up in the spring, but a sail fin on their body usually keeps them away from the shore. This spring, though, their sails were no match for the wind.

The species, also known as “purple sailor,” has stinging cells that are not seriously harmful to humans, but the Oregon State website warns it’s best to avoid rubbing your eyes after touching them or walking barefoot through them on the beach.

TIME Japan

Japan’s Population Falls to 15-Year Low

More than 1 in 4 people in Japan is now 65 or older

Japan’s population has dropped for the fourth year in a row, bringing it to a low not seen since 2000.

There were just more than 127 million people living in Japan as of last Oct. 1, which marked a decrease of 215,000 people compared to one year earlier, according to newly released government data reported by The Guardian.

The biggest problem for Japan may be the rate at which its population is aging. The number of people aged 65 or older in Japan has reached 33 million. More than 1 in 4 people are older than 65 and they outnumber people 14 and younger 2 to 1. The government estimates the population will drop to 86.7 million by 2060, with people over 65 making up 40% of the country.

Though the problem of falling birthrates and aging population is particularly acute in Japan, a similar problem is also brewing in Europe and the U.S. The federal government’s data from late last year showed that 2013 birthrates hit a record low in the U.S. in 2013, down 9% from a high in 2007, as American women delay having children.

 

TIME animals

Watch 3 Escaped Zebras Run Through Brussels

A video captures three zebras galloping calmly through the city


Three zebras were caught on video running through the streets of Brussels on Friday, after escaping from a ranch in Vilvorde near the city, the Guardian reports. The city dispatched two police crews and a traffic team to apprehend them. The zebras ran loose for about an hour. The best part is the sound of their hooves clopping on the street.

TIME Television

Why Stephen Colbert Wouldn’t Want to Take Over The Daily Show

George Lucas, Stephen Colbert
Charles Sykes—Invision/AP George Lucas, left, and Stephen Colbert attend the Tribeca Talks: Director Series during the Tribeca Film Festival at the BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center on April 17, 2015, in New York.

“I don’t want to be the guy who takes over for Jon Stewart"

Stephen Colbert had a quick response when George Lucas asked him on Friday why he wasn’t taking over The Daily Show from Jon Stewart.

“Don’t you think the perfect choice to replace that Jon Stewart fella would have been you?” Lucas asked Colbert at a Tribeca Film Festival panel, according to Deadline. “And now you’re working at Late Show where nobody sees you. Who stays up past 1 a.m.? Wouldn’t you say, I’m taking over the crown?”

Colbert replied, “I don’t want to be the guy who takes over for Jon Stewart. I’ve worked with him, and my memories of him is that he’s the keenest, most intelligent, most beautifully deconstructive mind—the clearest thinker I ever worked for. I would never get underneath his shadow. Someone else who doesn’t love him as much might have a better time on that show than I ever would.”

Stephen Colbert is taking over from David Letterman as the host of The Late Show on CBS, starting this fall. Comedian Trevor Noah is set to be Jon Stewart’s replacement on The Daily Show.

[Deadline]

TIME small businesses

Celebrate Record Store Day With Exclusive Vinyl Releases

BRITAIN-MUSIC-VINYL
Oli Scarff—AFP/Getty Images Joe Blanchard, an employee of the music shop 'Record Collector', arranges their vinyl stock ahead of tomorrow's 'Record Store Day' in Sheffield, Northern England on April 17, 2015.

Get a copy of Elvis' first recording

It’s time to celebrate vinyl.

Saturday is Record Store Day, an annual event that promotes independent record stores. Participating record stores across the world sell a limited supply of records released just for the day.

This year’s selection of 400 exclusive releases include David Bowie’s “Changes,” Bob Dylan’s “The Night We Called It a Day” and “15 Everly Hits” from The Everly Brothers.

Jeff Harrigfeld, co-owner of The Woodstock Music Shop in Woodstock, N.Y. said people were already lining up in front of the store before it opened at 9 a.m., with the first customer showing up at 5:30 a.m. to get first dibs. Harrigfeld’s personal favorite this year is a copy of Elvis’ first recording, a 10-inch record in a paper sleeve, recently purchased at auction by Jack White, lead singer and guitarist for The White Stripes. The record features two songs, “My Happiness” and “That’s When Your Heartaches Begin.”

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