TIME Jordan

Jordan’s King Abdullah Says the War Against ISIS ‘Is Our War’

"It has been for a long time," he tells CNN

Jordan’s King Abdullah II has intensified his rhetoric in the kingdom’s fight against ISIS.

“It is our war. It has been for a long time,” King Abdullah told CNN’s Fareed Zakaria during an interview that aired on Sunday.

The King went on to describe the Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria’s fighters as “outlaws” of Islam and said ISIS had set up an “irresponsible caliphate to try to expand their dominion over Muslims.”

ISIS forces captured Royal Jordanian Air Force fighter pilot Moath al-Kasasbeh last December and later burned him alive during a notorious video that they published online. The killing sparked retaliatory attacks from Jordan led by King Abdullah personally.

Read more at CNN

TIME Research

A New Treatment for Migraines Is Showing Promising Results

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Getty Images

Treating migraines effectively might have gotten a lot easier, according to a new study published this month.

Researchers at the Albany Medical Center claim that a new innovative treatment offers chronic migraine sufferers prolonged relief from the debilitating headaches.

During the procedure, clinicians insert a spaghetti-size catheter through the patient’s nasal passages and administer lidocaine to the sphenopalatine ganglion — a nerve bundle behind the nose that is associated with migraines. It should be noted that no needles actually touch the patient during the process.

“When the initial numbing of the lidocaine wears off, the migraine trigger seems to no longer have the maximum effect that it once did,” said Dr. Kenneth Mandato, the study’s lead researcher at Albany Medical Center.

Following the procedure, 88% of patients reported that they required less or no migraine medication to provide additional pain relief.

[Science Daily]

Read next: 8 Things You Don’t Know About Supplements

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TIME viral

How #TheDress Went Viral

Tracking an Internet sensation

Everyone knows the Internet can spread information at lightning speed. But few demonstrations of that have been more conclusive to more people than a seemingly banal debate about the color of a dress.

Before the phrase “black and blue or white and gold?” became a universally recognized question, the Internet was pursuing its usual obsession with kittens or celebrities (or runaway llamas).

Then, on Thursday at 6:14 pm EST, Buzzfeed published the story “What Colors Are This Dress?” based on a Tumblr page, where the hue of a Scottish woman’s dress was being fiercely debated among her friends and subsequently other netizens.

In a matter of hours the likes of Taylor Swift were weighing in on the matter, while memes from as far away as Burma mocked the debate with a dose of political satire.

When this article was being posted, the original Buzzfeed story had notched up a record-breaking 20.8 million views.

“At one point tonight (ET) more than 670,000 people were on Buzzfeed.com simultaneously, 500k of those on mobile, and half of those people were reading the dress post,” said the website.

Gawker and Vox quickly followed suit with online outlines. So did TIME. Then came the scientific explainers (ours is here) and then interviews with the woman who took the original picture. Expect the chin-stroking academic takes in a few hours time, as European and East Coast professors awake to a world that is consumed by such things as the precise color of a garment, and ponder its significance.

The Internet may remain poles apart over where the article of clothing falls in the color spectrum but #thedress, and the speed with which debate over it spread, shows us just how connected we all actually are.

Oh, and by the way: it’s #blueandblack.

TIME viral

This May Be Why You’re Seeing the Dress as White and Gold

Science explains an Internet sensation

The Internet officially broke on Thursday night thanks to a dress that had defied the classification of color. Is it white and gold or is it black and blue?

“I’ve studied individual differences in color vision for 30 years, and this is one of the biggest individual differences I’ve ever seen.” Jay Neitz, a color-vision researcher at the University of Washington in Seattle, told Wired.

However, the actual physiology of your eye might come into play with how you perceive the dress. According to Neitz, an individual’s lens, which is part of the eyeball, changes over the course of one’s lifespan. Individuals are less sensitive to blue light when they are older. Which could explain why older netizens are seeing white and gold. But, in the absence of hard-core data relating to age and perceptions regarding the dress, this theory cannot be proved yet.

At the same time, the way the dress is captured on camera could also be playing a significant role in this debate. According to Science Daily, humans are blessed with something called color constancy, which means that while color should be easily identifiable whether you’re in bright or dull lighting, things can change if the lighting is colored.

MORE Taylor Swift Says the Dress Is Black and Blue

“The wavelength composition of the light reflected from an object changes considerably in different conditions of illumination. Nevertheless, the color of the object remains the same,” writes Science Daily.

So, because the photo is taken in lighting with a blue hue, it may be causing the blues in the dress to reflect a white color. And while the dress may in fact be blue and black, the lighting does, for some viewers, make it appear to be white and gold.

However, experts agree that the only individuals who can accurately identify “the dress” are those who see it in person.

“Anyone who has ever worked in color management knows that a digital image is subject to many variables, including screen brightness and contrast, color calibration and ICC profile, the type of screen material and it’s corresponding lighting method, as well as the ambient light present,” says Matthew Sexton, a web designer of nearly 10-years experience, who formerly worked in TIME’s international production department.

“If you’re viewing it on a screen … it’s both people!”

Read next: The Sports World Weighs In on the Colors of #TheDress

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Military

U.S. Military Records Longest Period Without a Combat Death Since 9/11

US Army Medevac Tends To The Wounded In Afghanistan
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images A U.S. Army doctor monitors a patient inside a MEDEVAC helicopter on June 20, 2010, in Kandahar, Afghanistan.

It’s been more than two months since a U.S. solider has died in a combat zone

The U.S. military is currently enjoying its longest stretch without a combat death since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Wednesday marked the 75th day since American forces suffered its last fatality, when two soldiers were killed in Afghanistan’s Parwan province on Dec. 12 after their vehicle hit an improvised explosive device, reports the Washington Post.

The newspaper tallied the figure following a panel discussion at New York University’s campus in Washington D.C., after the father of a deceased serviceman raised a question pertaining to combat deaths during a Q&A session.

Read more at the Washington Post.

TIME Singapore

Singapore’s Former Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew Is Still on Life Support

Lee Kuan Yew
Wong Maye-E — AP Singapore's first Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew attends the Standard Chartered Singapore Forum in Singapore on March 20, 2013

The former head of government was admitted to hospital earlier this month after falling ill with pneumonia

Singaporean officials confirmed on Thursday that the country’s founding Prime Minister, Lee Kuan Yew, remains on life support in an intensive care unit.

The Prime Minister’s office released a statement clarifying Lee’s condition, after rumors swirled earlier this week that the 91-year-old former head of government had died.

“Mr Lee Kuan Yew is still warded in ICU at Singapore General Hospital. He remains sedated and on mechanical ventilation,” read the statement. “His doctors have restarted him on antibiotics, and are continuing to monitor him closely.”

Lee, who is largely credited with creating the conditions that allowed the former British colony to transform into a thriving international business hub, was first admitted to Singapore’s General Hospital on Feb. 5 after succumbing to severe pneumonia.

According to an earlier statement, Lee was both “conscious and lightly sedated” over the weekend.

TIME Drugs

Police Arrest Four Wesleyan Students Tied to Mass ‘Molly’ Overdose

Undated handout of ecstasy pills, which contain MDMA as their main chemical
Reuters Ecstasy pills, which contain MDMA as their main chemical, are pictured in this undated handout from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration

Two students remain in the hospital

Police in Middletown, Conn., have arrested four Wesleyan students in connection with a mass MDMA overdose over the weekend involving a bad batch of “molly” that left 12 people hospitalized.

The four students are reportedly in police custody and authorities are collecting evidence related to the incident.

“We take very seriously allegations concerning the distribution of dangerous drugs, and the university will continue to cooperate with state and local officials,” said Michael Roth, Wesleyan’s president, in a statement released Tuesday night.

School officials also announced that only two Wesleyan students are still being treated at a hospital in nearby Hartford.

Molly is the street name for MDMA, colloquially known as ecstasy, that is thought to be unusually pure and normally consumed in capsule form.

TIME neuroscience

Three Guys in Austria Have Basically Become Cyborgs After Getting Robotic Hands

The bionic hand allows the patients to perform everyday activities

Robotic hands have been successfully attached to three amputees in Austria, using a new technique that allows the users to control their electronic limbs with their minds.

The operations were completed by using an innovative procedure called bionic reconstruction, which connects prostheses directly to a patient’s nerves, according to a study in British medical journal The Lancet.

The procedure first involves intense cognitive training to prepare the body and mind for the advanced robotic prosthesis, followed by elective amputation and replacement. Once attached, the bionic hand allows all three patients to perform everyday activities, like using kitchen utensils and opening doors.

“So far, bionic reconstruction has only been done in our center in Vienna,” said Professor Oskar Aszmann from the Medical University of Vienna. “However, there are no technical or surgical limitations that would prevent this procedure from being done in centers with similar expertise and resources.”

[Science Daily]

TIME Music

Clark Terry, Legendary Jazz Trumpeter and Educator, Dies at 94

Highlights20050310-109CTerry
Jack Vartoogian —Getty Images American Jazz musician Clark Terry performs on trumpet and flluegelhorn at Jack Kleinsinger's Highlights during a "Salute to Jimmy Cobb" at the Tribeca Performing Arts Center in New York City on March 10, 2005.

He dedicated his later years to sharing his love of music with subsequent generations

Jazz trumpet and flugelhorn virtuoso Clark Terry, whose illustrious career spanned more than seven decades, died in the company of family, friends and students on Saturday. He was 94.

“We will miss him every minute of every day, but he will live on through the beautiful music and positivity that he gave to the world,” wrote his wife Gwen, in a message posted on Facebook. “Clark will live in our hearts forever.”

The legendary trumpeter played along some of the greatest jazz musicians of all time, including Dizzy Gillespie, Charles Mingus, Thelonious Monk and Duke Ellington.

Outside of performing, Clark was heralded as an influential educator. Over the years, he held numerous high school and collegiate jazz clinics, hosted summer camps for musicians and was also an adjunct professor at William Paterson University in New Jersey.

Last year, the St. Louis native starred in the documentary Keep On Keepin’ On, which chronicled his relationship with budding student Justin Kauflin during his final years.

TIME Ukraine

Ukraine’s Maidan Protests Anniversary Met With Bombs, Fresh Fighting

APTOPIX Ukraine
Sergei Chuzavkov—AP People march in downtown Kiev on Feb. 22, 2015, to commemorate last year's Maidan protest that toppled the country's pro-Kremlin government

A bombing in Kharkiv raises new questions about the fragile cease-fire hammered out earlier this month

Violence erupted in eastern Ukraine’s largest city on Sunday, as thousands across the country commemorated the anniversary of the popular uprising that toppled the pro-Kremlin administration, sparking a separatist revolt that so far has claimed more than 5,000 lives.

In Kharkiv, a northeastern city of some 1.5 million people, a bomb exploded as some 500 pro-Ukraine demonstrators marched through the city. Representatives from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe confirmed that the blast killed two people, while 11 were injured.

Ukrainian officials have taken four suspects into custody in connection with the attack, according to Reuters.

Another explosive device was discovered inside a shopping bag in the Black Sea city of Odessa on Sunday, though it was defused before it could detonate.

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko described the bombings campaign as a terrorist attack designed “to spread panic and fear.”

“They are trying to make us afraid,” he said in a statement.

Earlier on Sunday, Poroshenko marched with the Presidents of Poland, Lithuania and Georgia, along with tens of thousands of ordinary Ukrainians, through the streets of Kiev to honor the Maidan protests, which culminated with the ousting of his predecessor Viktor Yanukovych one year ago.

In the separatist stronghold of Donetsk, a rebel spokesman said militants had begun pulling back their heavy weaponry from the front in accordance with the truce, according to the New York Times.

Over the weekend, the two adversaries successfully exchanged almost 200 prisoners of war, including 139 Ukrainian soldiers and 52 rebels, reports the BBC.

Nevertheless, the Kharkiv blast and reports that Ukrainian troops had held off a rebel offensive near the village of Shyrokyne continue to cast doubts over the staying power of a cease-fire signed in Belarus earlier this month.

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