TIME celebrities

Detailed Online Allegations About Josh Duggar Were Made Years Ago

Duggar has admitted he acted “inexcusably” as a teenager

In May 2007, an online commenter, known simply as Alice, published a detailed account on a blog at ibiblio.org alleging that Josh Duggar had a history of molesting young girls, PEOPLE reports.

Late last week, the 19 Kids and Counting star acknowledged that he had acted “inexcusably” with several young girls as a teenager. Duggar has since resigned from the Family Research Council and TLC has yanked 19 Kids and Counting from its official schedule.

According to PEOPLE, Alice alleged that Duggar was a “child molestor” and said that “he should be removed from the home.”

Read more at PEOPLE

TIME Baseball

New York Yankees Retire Bernie Williams’ Number

Texas Rangers v New York Yankees
Al Bello — Getty Images Bernie Williams waves to the crowd during the ceremony to retire his number in Monument Park before the game against the Texas Rangers at Yankee Stadium on May 24, 2015 in New York City.

No one will ever don the pinstripes and the no. 51 in Yankee stadium again

The New York Yankees paid the ultimate respect to five-time all-star Bernie Williams on Sunday night by retiring his no. 51 jersey and placing a plaque dedicated to him in Monument Park alongside those of the team’s myriad other legends.

“This is unbelievable,” said Williams. “Never in my wildest dreams would I have thought that a skinny little 17-year-old kid from Puerto Rico could be here this day in this celebration.”

Although the center fielder last played with the Yankees in 2006, he didn’t officially retire until last month.

Williams by all indication has been rocking out hard since leaving the organization almost a decade ago. The former music student and avid guitarist has been jamming with the likes of Gregg Allman as of late and is slated to perform at the Laid Back Festival in Wantagh, New York in August.

TIME Research

Study Finds Possible Association Between Autism and Air Pollution

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Getty Images

Research suggests that early exposure to air pollution may have wide-ranging negative effects

A new study from the University of Pittsburgh suggests that exposure to fine particulate air pollution from pregnancy up and through the first two years of childhood may be linked with developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public Health conducted “a population-based, case-control study” of families living in southwestern Pennsylvania, which included children with and without ASD, reports Science Daily.

The research team was then able to estimate an individual’s exposure to specific categories of air pollution based on where their mothers lived before, during and after pregnancy.

“There is increasing and compelling evidence that points to associations between Pittsburgh’s poor air quality and health problems, especially those affecting our children and including issues such as autism spectrum disorder and asthma,” said Grant Oliphant, president of the Heinz Endowments, which funded the research project.

However, the members of the study stressed that their findings “reflect an association” but does not ultimately prove causality.

[Science Daily]

TIME Crime

Colorado Triathlon Canceled in the Wake of Multiple Shootings and Sniper Fears

Bicyclist Fatally Shot
Jason Pohl — AP Windsor Police investigate the area where a cyclist was fatally shot in Windsor, Colo.

Federal agents join investigation into possible serial shooter

A popular triathlon in northern Colorado has been canceled following a rash of shootings near the small town of Windsor, which has left one person dead and another injured.

John Jacoby, 48, was shot dead earlier this week while cycling along a stretch of road just outside of Windsor, reports ABC News. The incident occurred in close proximity to an earlier shooting late last month, when a 20-year-old woman survived being shot in the neck while driving along Interstate 25 outside of nearby Fort Collins.

Local officials are working in tandem with federal investigators, who are scrambling to see if the two events are connected. In the wake of the shootings, organizers of Pelican Fest Sprint Triathlon have canceled the race slated for this weekend because of security concerns.

“My decision was based on the overall safety of all the athletes, volunteers, traffic control personnel, spectators and vendors,” wrote Dennis Vanderheiden, the race’s director, in a post published online. “The proximity of the shooting death and the bike course gave me real concerns.”

TIME society

Couple Who Immigrated to America Leaves $847K Estate to U.S. Government

Mystery continues to surround their generous donation

A Seattle couple, who met after the husband fled Nazi-occupied Europe to American shores, have left their entire estate the “to the government of the United States of America” in their identical wills, reports ABC.

Earlier this month, the U.S. Department of Treasury received a cashier’s check for $847,215.57 on behalf of the estate of Peter and Joan Petrasek.

Although the couple never explicitly stated their reason for the donation, officials have pointed to the couple’s immigrant roots and the husband’s escape from Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia as a possible reason behind the generosity. Joan was also an immigrant originally from Ireland.

“This case is interesting because it seems to be that these were two immigrants who felt grateful to have this adoptive country open its arms to them after having a hard time in Eastern Europe during World War II,” said Peter Winn, the U.S. assistant attorney who helped handle the case, told the broadcaster.

“It’s pretty obvious these folks felt pretty proud they were U.S. citizens.”

[ABC]

TIME human behavior

Researchers Unlock the Secret Behind Successful Hitmen

They all share a very particular personality trait

Successful contract killers are people who are able to see what they do purely as a job, according to a new study published by researchers at England’s Birmingham City University.

According to the study’s findings, hitmen tend to operate best when they’re able to compartmentalize and detach themselves from their victims’ humanity, regarding killing as simply a means to a profitable end.

The researchers behind the study, leading criminologists Professor David Wilson and Mohammed Rahman, point to the Irish Republican Army’s infamous hired gun Jimmy Moody as a paragon of the profession.

Moody, despite having no political affiliation to the militant group, succeeded in large part, Rahman argues, because he was able to separate his grisly work from other aspects of his life.

“Moody reframed his victims as targets, seeing getting the job done as a normal business activity,” said Rahman. “These sorts of killers are akin to ‘criminal undertakers’, who have given themselves ‘special liberty’ to get things done in the name of business.”

TIME Television

Read President Obama’s Simple Tribute as David Letterman Signs Off

Letterman ended his 33-year run as a late-night legend on Wednesday

President Barack Obama summed up the feelings of a nation in one tweet as David Letterman ended his 33-year run as a late-night legend on Wednesday night.

Obama has appeared as a special guest on the Late Show on three different occasions. The two appeared to establish a rapport.

During his final appearance on the Late Show two weeks ago, the President suggested meeting up with Letterman after he left office for a game of dominoes or a trip to Starbucks to swap stories.

TIME Burma

U.S. Condemns Burma’s Treatment of Rohingya as Migrant Crisis Intensifies

Nearly 4,000 people remain stranded at sea with dwindling supplies

Washington called on the nations of Southeast Asia to marshal their forces to help thousands of Burmese and Bangladeshi migrants who have been marooned on the high seas for weeks.

UNHCR, the U.N. refugee agency, warned on Tuesday “that time was running out” for the migrants fleeing sectarian violence in Burma and poverty in neighboring Bangladesh.

“We estimate that nearly 4,000 people from [Burma] and Bangladesh remain stranded at sea with dwindling supplies on board,” Adrian Edwards, a UNHCR spokesman, told journalists in Geneva. “Unconfirmed reports suggest the number could be higher.”

On Wednesday, fishermen from the Indonesian province of Aceh helped rescue more than 430 stranded migrants, many of whom were suffering from dehydration and starvation after spending months on rickety trawlers.

Indonesian, Thai and Malaysian officials held an emergency meeting in Kuala Lumpur on Wednesday to address the desperate plight of the migrants, who were abandoned by traffickers following a crackdown on their smuggling networks in Thailand. Following the meeting, both Indonesia and Malaysia agreed to stop pushing boats back to sea and provide temporary shelter to thousands adrift at sea. (Thailand made no such guarantee.)

On Tuesday, the U.S. State Department lambasted Burma, officially called Myanmar, for failing to address the root cause of the crisis, which observers say stems largely from the government’s refusal to recognize the Muslim minority as lawful citizens.

“What needs to change here is that the Rohingya need to feel welcome in the country of their birth, in the country of their parents’ birth, of their grandparents’ birth,” Tom Malinowski, Assistant Secretary of State for democracy, human rights and labor, told CNN during an interview on Tuesday.

“They need to be treated as citizens with dignity and human rights.”

Within Burma, the Rohingya are widely discriminated against by the country’s Buddhist majority and are commonly viewed as interlopers from Bangladesh, despite overwhelming evidence that they’ve lived in the country for generations.

The Burmese government has even refused to discuss the migrant issue with other nations who used the term Rohingya instead of Naypyidaw’s preferred, and racially loaded, term of Bengalis.

“If we recognize the name, then they will think they are citizens of Myanmar … Myanmar cannot take all the blame for these people who are now at sea,” Zaw Htay, a director in the office of Burmese President Thein Sein, told CNN.

The Rohingya were effectively rendered stateless after being stripped of their citizenship by the former ruling junta in 1982 and have been systemically excluded from Burmese society since.

Following a rash of ethnosectarian rioting in 2012, more than 120,000 Rohingya have been forced to reside in squalid displacement camps, bereft of adequate food or medical supplies, which has been instrumental in pushing thousands to flee by boat with the hopes of reaching Malaysia.

In a bulletin published on the front page of the state-backed daily the Global New Light of Myanmar on Wednesday, Burma’s Foreign Ministry promised to begin providing humanitarian assistance to “anyone who suffered in the sea.”

Read next: The Rohingya, Burma’s Forgotten Muslims by James Nachtwey

However, analysts argue that little will change in the long run until Burma and neighboring countries address the systemic conditions that prompt this wretched community to risk their lives at sea rather than live in the country of their birth.

“The governments need to pull Myanmar to the table regardless of whatever excuses they try to come up with,” Lilianne Fan, co-founder of the Indonesia-based Geutanyoe Foundation that works to assist the refugees and migrants in Aceh, tells TIME.

According to the statistics compiled by the International Organization for Migration, more the 88,000 people have made the dangerous voyage across the Bay of Bengal since 2014, including 25,000 who arrived during the first quarter of this year.

At least 1,000 are believed to have died at sea because of “the precarious conditions of the voyage, and an equal number because of mistreatment and privation” wrought by human traffickers.

TIME mma

Ronda Rousey Says She’d Only Fight Floyd Mayweather ‘if We Were Dating’

Take that Floyd

Undefeated UFC bantamweight champion Ronda Rousey said she’d have no problem taking down controversial boxing icon Floyd Mayweather if push came to shove.

During an interview with Access Hollywood this week, the former Olympian said it’s unlikely the two will ever meet in the ring, before delivering a pop shot at the boxer’s checkered history with domestic violence.

“Well, I would never say that I can’t beat anyone, but I don’t think me and him would ever fight, unless we ended up dating,” said Rousey.

In 2012, Mayweather spent almost three months behind bars after being found guilty of assaulting his ex-girlfriend.

[Access Hollywood]

TIME viral

This 5-Year-Old’s Random Act of Kindness Brought Waffle House Customers to Tears

Dickens couldn’t have scripted it better

Kids often say the darnedest things, but other times they act in the most humane fashion.

At a Waffle House in Prattville, Ala., 5-year-old Josiah Duncan shocked fellow customers after he asked his mother to help a destitute man who walked into the eatery and was being ignored.

As the visibly impoverished customer waited, Duncan begged his mother to buy the man a meal after learning that he was likely homeless.

“He came in and sat down, and nobody really waited on him,” Ava Faulk, the boy’s mother, told local news outlet WSFA. “So Josiah jumped up and asked him if he needed a menu because you can’t order without one.”

After ordering a burger topped with bacon, the child insisted on saying a prayer before breaking bread with the homeless patron, eliciting tears from fellow customers.

“Watching my son touch the 11 people in that Waffle House tonight will be forever one of the greatest accomplishments as a parent I’ll ever get to witness,” said Faulk.

[WSFA]

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