TIME Crime

Police Officer Shot in Ferguson

Police-Shooting-Missouri
Missouri State Highway Patrol troopers stand posted at the corner of Chambers Road and West Florissant Avenue on Sept. 27, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo., as police search for a suspect in the shooting of a Ferguson police officer. Christian Gooden—AP

Was shot in the arm and is expected to survive

FERGUSON, Mo. — A search for two suspects in a St. Louis suburb that’s undergone racial unrest continued Sunday after a Ferguson police officer was shot in the arm following an encounter with two men at a community center who ran from him and then opened fire during a foot chase, authorities said.

St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar said at a media briefing early Sunday that the officer approached the men around 9:10 p.m. Saturday because the community center was closed. As the officer approached, the men ran away. When the officer gave chase, “one of the men turned and shot,” Belmar said.

The officer was shot in the arm and is expected to survive, he said. Belmar did not identify the officer or give further details about his condition. He said the officer returned fire but said police have “no indication” that either suspect was shot.

A search was underway for the suspects early Sunday in Ferguson, where some community members remain uneasy in the wake of the August shooting death of an unarmed black 18-year-old by a white police officer.

Belmar said he did not think the officer’s shooting was related to two separate protests about Michael Brown’s shooting that were going on Saturday night around the same time.

Around midnight at the police station, approximately two dozen officers stood near a group of about 100 protesters who mingled on a street corner, occasionally shouting, “No justice; no peace.”

Nearby, part of a road was closed in town as police conducted a search for the suspects. Numerous law enforcement agencies were responding, and police helicopters were canvassing the area.

The officer’s shooting comes after Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson issued a videotaped apology to Brown’s family earlier in the week and attempted to march with protesters, an effort that led to a clash with activists and several arrests on Thursday.

Brown’s parents told The Associated Press on Saturday they were unmoved by the apology.

Brown’s mother, Lesley McSpadden, said, “yes,” when asked if Jackson should be fired, and his father, Michael Brown Sr., said rather than an apology, they would like to see the officer who shot their son arrested.

A county grand jury is weighing whether to indict Ferguson officer Darren Wilson in Brown’s shooting.

The Justice Department, which is investigating whether Brown’s civil rights were violated, is conducting a broader probe into Ferguson police. On Friday, it urged Jackson to ban his officers from wearing bracelets supporting Wilson while on duty and from covering up their name plates with black tape.

Ferguson residents complained about the bracelets, which are black with “I am Darren Wilson” in white lettering, at a meeting with federal officials this week.

Brown’s shooting has also focused attention on the lack of diversity in many police departments across the country. In Ferguson, of 53 officers in a community that is two-thirds black, only three are African-American.

Also early Sunday, not far from Ferguson, an off-duty St. Louis city police officer was injured on Interstate 70 when three suspects fired shots into his personal vehicle, a police spokeswoman said.

Schron Jackson said the officer, who has nearly 20 years of experience, was being treated at a hospital for a minor injury to his arm from broken glass. She said there is no reason to believe the two shootings were related.

TIME Infectious Disease

NIH to Care For US Doctor Exposed to Ebola Virus

Ebola virus
Getty Images

WASHINGTON — The National Institutes of Health is preparing to care for an American doctor who was exposed to the Ebola virus while volunteering in Sierra Leone.

As early as Sunday, the physician is expected to be admitted to the special isolation unit at NIH’s hospital out of what the agency called “an abundance of caution,” for observation.

NIH infectious disease chief Dr. Anthony Fauci wouldn’t discuss details about the patient but said that in general, an exposure to Ebola doesn’t necessarily mean someone will become sick.

Four other American aid workers who were infected with Ebola while volunteering in the West African outbreak have been treated at hospitals in Georgia and Nebraska. One remains hospitalized while the rest have recovered.

TIME

James Traficant, Convicted Ex-Congressman, Dies

CLEVELAND — James Traficant, the colorful Ohio politician whose conviction for taking bribes and kickbacks made him only the second person to be expelled from Congress since the Civil War, died Saturday. He was 73.

Traficant was seriously injured Tuesday after a vintage tractor flipped over on him as he tried to park it inside a barn on the family farm near Youngstown. He died four days later in the hospital, said Dave Betras, chairman of the Mahoning County Democratic Party.

The Democrat’s expulsion from Congress in 2002 came three months after a federal jury in Cleveland convicted him. Prosecutors said he used his office to extract bribes from businesspeople and coerced staffers to work on his farm and his house boat on the Potomac River in Washington. He also was charged with witness tampering, destroying evidence and filing false tax returns. He spent seven years in prison.

Traficant’s notoriety was rivaled only by his eccentricity.

He loved to play the buffoon during his 17 years in Congress. He got plenty of notice within the staid, buttoned-down Capitol and airtime on C-SPAN for his messy mop of hair — revealed to be a wig when he went to prison — his typical wardrobe of cowboy boots, denim or polyester suits, and his bombastic speaking style.

His made-for-TV rants on the House floor invariably ended with the signoff “Beam me up,” which Traficant borrowed from “Star Trek” to show his disgust or bemusement at whatever he found particularly outrageous.

He was born May 8, 1941, in Youngstown and was a quarterback for the University of Pittsburgh, where he played with future NFL coaches Mike Ditka and Marty Schottenheimer.

He worked as a drug counselor for 10 years before running for Mahoning County sheriff at a colleague’s suggestion.

He endeared himself to voters in the early 1980s by defying the courts and going to jail for three nights rather than foreclose on the homes of workers laid off from the city’s dying steel industry.

The antagonism between Traficant and federal law enforcement authorities lasted throughout his public career, with Traficant trumpeting it as proof that he was on the side of “the little guy” against powerful government interests.

He faced his first federal bribery and corruption trial in 1983, when he was Mahoning County sheriff. Prosecutors accused Traficant of taking bribes to protect mobsters’ criminal activity. He defended himself in court, although he was not a lawyer, and won. He argued that he was conducting a one-person sting.

He was elected to Congress the following year and was easily re-elected eight times.

TIME Syria

US-Led Planes Strike Fighters Attacking Syria Town

Syrian Kurdish boys, fleeing an onslaught by ISIS, sit in a truck as they cross the Syria Turkey border at the southeastern town of Suruc in Sanliurfa province, on Sept. 27, 2014.
Syrian Kurdish boys, fleeing an onslaught by ISIS, sit in a truck as they cross the Syria Turkey border at the southeastern town of Suruc in Sanliurfa province, on Sept. 27, 2014. Bulent Kilic—AFP/Getty Images

BEIRUT — U.S.-led coalition warplanes struck Islamic State fighters in Syria attacking a town near the Turkish border for the first time Saturday, as well as positions in the country’s east, activists and a Kurdish official said.

The Islamic State group’s assault on the Syrian Kurdish town of Kobani has sent more than 100,000 refugees streaming across the border into Turkey in recent days as Kurdish forces from Iraq and Turkey have raced to the front lines to defend the town.

Nawaf Khalil, a spokesman for Syria’s Kurdish Democratic Union Party, or PYD, said the strikes targeted Islamic State positions near Kobani, also known as Ayn Arab, destroying two tanks. He said the jihadi fighters later shelled the town, wounding a number of civilians.

The United States and five Arab allies launched an aerial campaign against Islamic State fighters in Syria early Tuesday with the aim of rolling back and ultimately crushing the extremist group, which has created a proto-state spanning the Syria-Iraq border. Along the way, the militants have massacred captured Syrian and Iraqi troops, terrorized minorities in both countries and beheaded two American journalists and a British aid worker.

The latest airstrikes came as Syria’s Foreign Minister Walid al-Moallem told the Lebanon-based Al-Mayadeen TV that airstrikes alone “will not be able wipe out” the Islamic State group. Speaking from New York where he is attending the U.N. General Assembly, al-Moallem said in remarks broadcast Saturday that the U.S. should work with Damascus if it wants to win the war.

“They must know the importance of coordination with the people of this country because they know what goes on there,” al-Moallem said. The U.S. has ruled out any coordination with President Bashar Assad’s government, which is at war with the Islamic State group as well as Western-backed rebels.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said the coalition’s strikes near Kobani came amid heavy fighting between the Islamic State group and members of the Kurdish force known as the People’s Protection Units, or YPK.

The Britain-based group, which relies on activists inside Syria, had no immediate word on casualties from Saturday’s strikes. The Observatory reported Friday that 13 civilians have been killed by the strikes since they began.

Kurdish fighter Majid Goran told the Associated Press by telephone from Kobani that two bombs were dropped over the nearby village of Ali Shar, at 6 a.m. (0300 GMT), but that the positions they struck were empty.

Turkey’s Dogan news agency reported Saturday that the sound of heavy fighting could be heard from the Turkish border village of Karaca. The agency said Kurdish forces retook some positions they had lost to the Islamic militants a few days ago. It did not cite a source for the report.

Dozens of people wounded in the fighting arrived in Turkey for treatment on Saturday, it said.

Another Kurdish fighter, Ismet Sheikh Hasan, said the Turkish military on Saturday night retaliated after stray shells landed on Turkish territory, firing in the Ali Shar region. He said the Turkish action left Kurdish fighters in the middle of the crossfire.

He said that on Friday, the Islamic militants were attacking the Kobani area from the east with tanks and artillery, advancing on Ali Shar and Haja. He said some 20 people were killed, including Kurdish fighters and civilians, while another 50 people were wounded.

The fighting around Kobani sparked one of the largest single outflows of refugees since Syria’s conflict began more than three years ago. The Syrian Kurdish forces have long been one of the most effective fighting units battling the Islamic State, but the tide has turned in recent weeks as the Islamic militants have attacked with heavy weapons likely looted from neighboring Iraq.

The Observatory said other coalition airstrikes targeted Islamic State compounds in the central province of Homs and the northern regions of Raqqa and Aleppo. The group said 31 explosions were heard in the city of Raqqa, the group’s de facto capital, and its suburbs.

The Local Coordination Committees, another activist group, said the strikes in the east hit the province of Deir el-Zour as well as Raqqa. The LCC also said the coalition targeted grain silos west of Deir el-Zour city.

It was not immediately clear why the silos were targeted.

Max Blumenfeld, a spokesman for U.S. Central Command, said the U.S. airstrikes “don’t target food or anything else than can be used by the civilian population.” But he said that until the military reviews images from planes that participated in the strikes, he could not rule out that silos were hit.

He said the airstrikes are aimed at specific Islamic State targets such as command and control centers, transportation and logistics, and oil refineries, “but not food that could have an impact upon the civilian population.”

“Our targets are structures that combatants would use,” he said.

In recent days coalition warplanes had struck oil-producing facilities in eastern Syria in a bid to cut off one of the Islamic State group’s main revenue streams — black market oil sales that the U.S. says generate up to $2 million a day.

The coalition striking Syria includes Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Bahrain and Jordan, and the strikes are an extension of the U.S. campaign in neighboring Iraq launched in August.

Near the capital Damascus, Syrian troops meanwhile entered the once rebel-held northeastern suburb of Adra after days of clashes, Syrian state TV said. The advance came two days after troops captured the nearby Adra industrial zone.

 

TIME Hong Kong

Hong Kong Protesters Brace for More Police Confrontations

HONG KONG (AP) — Thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators at Hong Kong government headquarters braced for a second night of confrontations with authorities Saturday after police arrested dozens during a chaotic protest against Beijing’s refusal to allow genuine democratic reforms in the semiautonomous city.

Wearing goggles and plastic wrap to protect against police pepper spray, the protesters — most of them students — occupied a street outside government headquarters. They defended their position with metal crowd-control barricades originally brought in by authorities, placing them at both ends of the street.

Earlier in the day, police arrested 74 people who had stormed into a courtyard in the government complex late Friday, some of them scaling a tall fence. They refused to leave until police cleared them out by early Saturday afternoon. The protesters, the youngest of whom is 16, were arrested for offenses including assault and disorderly conduct.

The standoff follows a weeklong strike by students demanding China’s Communist leaders allow Hong Kong fully democratic elections in 2017. Thousands of university and college students who had spent the week boycotting classes were joined Friday by a smaller group of high school students.

At least 34 people have been injured since the protest began, including four police officers and 11 government staff and guards, authorities said. One of the officers suffered a gash after being poked by one of the umbrellas the protesters have been using to deflect pepper spray.

Police issued a news release urging the protesters to leave peacefully and avoid obstructing officers, saying that otherwise they would “soon take actions to restore public order.”

Ingrid Sze, a 22-year-old student at the Hong Kong Institute of Education, said she joined the demonstrators after seeing the police take action.

“I didn’t participate in the boycott all week. But I saw what was happening to the students live on TV and I thought what the police were doing was so outrageous I had to come out tonight to support the students and my friends,” she said.

Hong Kong Secretary for Security Lai Tung-kwok told reporters that police acted appropriately and gave students sufficient warning before starting the process of clearing the square.

China, which took control of the former British colony in 1997, has promised that Hong Kong can have universal suffrage. But tensions over the Asian financial hub’s political future boiled over after China’s legislature last month ruled out letting the public nominate candidates, instead insisting they be screened by a committee of Beijing loyalists similar to the one that currently picks the city’s leader.

Hong Kong’s young people have been among the most vocal supporters of full democracy in recent years, fueled by anger over widening inequality. They also fear that Beijing’s tightening grip is eroding the city’s rule of law and guaranteed civil liberties unseen on the mainland such as freedom of speech.

“We really want real democracy, so we’ll stay here and fight to get what we want,” said Jo Tai, a 28-year-old teacher. “We don’t want everyone else to decide our future; we want the right to decide our future for this generation and the next generation.” She and others said they were prepared to be arrested.

Demonstrators chanted slogans including “Fight to the end” and “Free the protesters” and carried placards calling for civil disobedience. Supporters dropped off piles of water bottles, energy drinks, bread, chocolate, biscuits, fruit and other provisions.

Organizers said those arrested at government headquarters included Joshua Wong, a 17-year-old leader of the activist group Scholarism, who was dragged away by four officers. Wong, a recent high school graduate, gained prominence two years ago after he organized protests that forced Hong Kong’s government to back off plans to introduce a Chinese national education curriculum that some feared was a form of brainwashing.

“Our movement is peaceful and does not use aggression,” said University of Hong Kong students’ union president Yvonne Leung. “Students who decided to storm inside (the government complex) knew about their legal responsibility.”

The student protest was organized independently of Occupy Central, an alliance of pro-democracy activists planning to blockade Hong Kong’s financial district to call for genuine democratic reforms.

On Saturday, several Occupy Central members joined students protesting outside the square.

Benny Tai, a key leader of the Occupy Central movement, told reporters that the group would “stay with the students until the end and risk getting arrested ourselves.” Tai criticized the amount of force police used on students.

Occupy Central has hinted that its blockade will begin Wednesday, China’s National Day holiday. But the organizers canceled a planned announcement Sunday to confirm the timing, saying they wanted to focus on supporting the students.

TIME celebrities

Chelsea Clinton Gives Birth to Baby Girl

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bill and Hillary Clinton are grandparents. The couple’s daughter, Chelsea Clinton, has given birth to her first child, a daughter named Charlotte.

Chelsea Clinton, the daughter of the former president and ex-secretary of state, announced the baby’s birth on Twitter and Facebook early Saturday, saying she and husband Marc Mezvinsky are “full of love, awe and gratitude as we celebrate the birth of our daughter, Charlotte Clinton Mezvinsky.”

Clinton spokesman Kamyl Bazbaz said the child was born on Friday but did not immediately provide additional details. The couple lives in New York City. The Clintons quickly retweeted their daughter’s message on Twitter but did not immediately comment on the baby’s arrival.

The baby arrives as Hillary Clinton deliberates on whether to seek the White House in 2016, a decision that could put her on a path to becoming the nation’s first female president. Clinton is the leading Democratic contender to succeed President Barack Obama, her former 2008 campaign rival, and has said she expects to make a decision around the beginning of next year.

The baby has been eagerly anticipated as Hillary Clinton considers her political future — she has called the prospect of becoming a grandmother her “most exciting title yet.” She even has picked out the first book she intends to read to her grandchild, the classic “Goodnight Moon.”

She has said she didn’t want to make any decisions about another campaign until the baby’s arrival, pointing to her interest in enjoying becoming a grandmother for the first time. If Clinton decides to run for president, her campaign would coincide with the baby’s first two years.

The former president has been eager to become a grandfather. During an event with former President George W. Bush in September, Mr. Clinton’s cell phone rang on stage and he joked that only two people had the number “and they are related to me,” musing that he hoped he wasn’t becoming “a premature grandfather.”

“Every day I get up and I say, ‘You have to remember whose child this is. Do not interfere. Be there when you are welcome. Be loving but not judgmental,” Clinton said to laughs in an interview with CNN at his annual Clinton Global Initiative, only days before the baby’s arrival.

Even Obama got into the act. Addressing the annual Clinton confab, Obama quipped if Chelsea Clinton went into labor during his speech, “she has my motorcade and will be able to navigate traffic.”

The 34-year-old Chelsea Clinton said in an interview with Glamour magazine last year that she and her husband had hoped to make 2014 “the year of the baby.” She announced her pregnancy in April at the end of a forum in New York on female empowerment.

“I just hope I will be as good a mom to my child and, hopefully, children as my mom was to me,” she said at the time.

Chelsea Clinton grew up in the public eye as a teenager in the White House, later graduating from Stanford and Columbia universities. She worked in finance in New York and in public health, earning a doctorate from Oxford University.

She serves as vice chair of her family’s foundation, which was renamed the Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation, and helps direct the organization’s humanitarian and philanthropic efforts around the globe. She recently departed NBC News, where she served as a special correspondent.

The new parents, who married in 2010, were friends as teenagers in Washington and both attended Stanford. Mezvinsky is a hedge fund manager and the son of former Reps. Majorie Margolies of Pennsylvania and Edward Mezvinsky of Iowa, longtime friends of the Clintons.

TIME

Hornets’ Taylor Banned from Team Activities

Hornets Taylor Arrested Basketball
In a photo provided by East Lansing, Mich., authorities, Charlotte Hornets forward Jeffery Taylor appears in a photo after his arrest, Sept. 25, 2014, in East Lansing, Mich., on domestic assault charges. City of East Lansing/AP

Hornets forward Jeffery Taylor will not be participating in any team-related activities during an NBA investigation into his arrest on domestic assault charges, the team announced Friday.

“As an organization, we understand and appreciate the seriousness of this matter, and will assist the NBA and law enforcement in any way we can until this comes to an acceptable resolution,” the Hornets said in a statement Friday. “We have spoken with Jeffery and his representatives and they fully understand our position.”

NBA spokesman Mike Bass said that the league supports “the Charlotte Hornets’ decision to separate Jeffery Taylor from the team during the investigation.”

East Lansing Police in Michigan said in a press release Thursday the 25-year-old Taylor has been charged with one count of domestic assault, one count of assault and one count of malicious destruction of property. According to the release, police officers responded to an incident at the East Lansing Marriott at University Place around 1a.m. Thursday.

The Hornets open the preseason on Oct. 8 in Philadelphia, the same day Taylor has a pre-trial court date at East Lansing District Court.

Ingham County prosecutor Stuart Dunnings announced the date Friday.

A jury selection for the case is set for Oct. 14, Dunnings said, adding that Taylor also has the option for a bench trial, rather than a jury trial.

Taylor, who is not married, is from Norrköping, Sweden and resides in Charlotte, North Carolina. It is unclear why he was in Michigan.

The prosecutor said the police report will not be released while the incident is under investigation.

The Hornets cancelled a media luncheon with coach Steve Clifford scheduled for Friday so team officials could focus on dealing with the Taylor issue.

Taylor is the latest professional athlete in Charlotte charged in a domestic abuse case.

Greg Hardy, a defensive end for the Carolina Panthers, was convicted July 15 of assault on a female and communicating threats after the woman said he threw her down on a bed of guns and tossed her into the shower.

Hardy is appealing the ruling and a jury trial is set for Nov. 17.

The Panthers removed Hardy from their active roster last week, ending three weeks of indecision regarding his playing status. He played Week 1 and sat out the next game before being placed on the exempt-commissioner’s permission last week after the NFL came under public fire for its penalties in domestic violence cases.

The Hornets have their media day with player availability on Monday and will open training camp Tuesday in Asheville, North Carolina.

A second-round pick in 2012 out of Vanderbilt, Taylor missed most of last year with a ruptured Achilles tendon but is healthy now.

The 6-foot-7, 225-pound Taylor has been competing for the past two seasons with Michael Kidd-Gilchrist for a starting spot at small forward. He played in 26 games with eight starts last season before suffering his injury in late December.

As a rookie in 2012, he played in 77 games with 29 starts. He has averaged 6.6 points and 2.0 rebounds for his career.

Taylor is the second Hornets player involved in offseason incidents.

Rookie guard P.J. Hairston has a court date set for Nov. 14 for a misdemeanor charge of assault and battery following an altercation with a high school basketball player during a pickup game in July. Hairston was issued a summons but police did not arrest him.

In court documents Kentrell Barkley, a senior at Northern Durham High School, said Hairston “punched him twice in the head” during a heated basketball game at the Durham YMCA.

TIME

Teacher Gets 10 Years in Custody in Student Rape

(BILLINGS, Mont.) — A Montana teacher was sentenced Friday to 10 years in custody in a student rape case that led to the censure of a judge who partially blamed the victim.

Stacey Dean Rambold, 55, was resentenced by Judge Randal Spaulding exactly a year after he completed an initial one-month prison term for the crime.

Rambold appeared to grimace as the new sentence was read. He was then handcuffed and led away by deputies, pausing briefly to exchange words with family as he exited the courtroom.

Rambold pleaded guilty to a single count of sexual intercourse without consent in the 2007 incident involving 14-year-old Cherice Moralez, a freshman in his Billings Senior High School business class. She committed suicide in 2010.

The state Supreme Court overturned Rambold’s initial sentence, citing in part comments from Judge G. Todd Baugh who suggested the victim shared responsibility.

Baugh was censured and suspended for 31 days. He’s stepping down when his terms ends in January.

Yellowstone County Attorney Scott Twito said he was pleased with the sentence that included five additional years that were suspended.

“The criminal justice system worked today,” he said.

John Moralez, the father of the victim, had hoped for a longer sentence but said it was better than the one-month previously serviced by Rambold.

During the hearing, Twito asked Judge Spaulding to reject defense attempts to make the victim’s conduct in the case a factor in Rambold’s sentencing.

That included references by the defendant’s attorney to video-taped interviews of the victim recorded by law enforcement prior to her death. Those recordings, which have never been made public, had been cited by Baugh during his sentencing.

Under state law, children under 16 cannot consent to sexual intercourse.

“The last thing we want to do is sit here in the criminal justice system and say, ‘What is the age?’ It doesn’t matter. Fourteen is way too young,” Twito said. “There has to be punishment. … Punishment means prison.”

Rambold’s attorney, Jay Lansing, responded that there was no statute preventing the court from considering Moralez’s conduct. He pointed out that similar objections were never raised by prosecutors during Rambold’s first sentence, and said they were seeking a “do-over,” which Lansing asserted was not allowed under state and federal law.

In a letter to the court, Rambold sought forgiveness and lamented the international publicity his case has generated.

“No one can really appreciate and understand what it feels like to have so many people actually hate you and be disgusted by you,” Rambold wrote. “I do not mention this for the sake of sympathy, but it has been hard.”

Twito asked the court to impose a 10-year prison sentence with another 10 years suspended. That is the same sentence prosecutors sought last year when the case was before Baugh, who instead adopted the much more lenient term suggested by Rambold’s defense attorney.

Without Moralez, their primary witness, prosecutors struck a deal with Rambold that initially allowed him to avoid prison altogether.

Rambold, however, violated that agreement by having unauthorized visits with relatives’ children and entering into a relationship with an adult woman without telling his counselor. As a result, the case was revived and Rambold pleaded guilty last year to the count of sexual intercourse without consent.

During the first sentencing, Baugh suggested the victim had as much control over her rape as the defendant and said she “appeared older than her chronological age.” He gave Rambold a 15-year term with all but one month suspended.

That triggered an appeal from prosecutors and ultimately resulted in the case being reassigned to Spaulding.

Baugh’s comments and the lenient sentence he handed down landed him before the state Supreme Court for disciplinary proceedings, which resulted in a 30-day suspension from the bench and a public censure for his misconduct in the case.

In a sentencing memorandum filed this week, Twito wrote that a tough sentence for Rambold was warranted given his position of authority over Moralez.

“His position of trust as a high school teacher, abuse of that position, and violations against the victim overshadows all mitigating circumstances,” Twito wrote.

TIME

Diamondbacks Fire Manager Kirk Gibson

(PHOENIX) — The Diamondbacks have fired manager Kirk Gibson three years after he won the NL’s manager of the year award for leading Arizona to the playoffs.

The Diamondbacks are assured of at least a tie for the worst record in the majors this season, having lost 96 games entering the final series of the year.

The move came as the Diamondbacks front office restructures under chief baseball officer Tony La Russa following a third disappointing season in a row. Arizona went 81-81 in 2013 and 2012. Former major league pitcher Dave Stewart was hired Thursday as the team’s new general manager.

TIME

Stocks Rise at the End of a Rough Week; Nike Jumps

(NEW YORK) — The U.S. stock market bounced back Friday as investors welcomed good news on the U.S. economy at the end of a turbulent week of trading. Nike jumped after turning in higher profits, leading the Dow Jones industrial average higher.

KEEPING SCORE: The Dow was up 178 points, or 1.1 percent, to 17,124 as of 2:57 p.m. Eastern. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose 17 points, or 0.9 percent, to 1,983 and the Nasdaq composite climbed 46 points, or 1percent, to 4,512.

The S&P 500, the benchmark for most mutual funds, remains on track to lose 1 percent this week. The biggest drop came Thursday, the worst day for the stock market since July 31.

A VIEW: A steep drop one day is often followed by gains the next as investors hunt for beaten-down stocks. “After yesterday, it’s only normal to get a little bit back because people tend to buy on the dips,” said Jason Pride, director of investment strategy at Glenmede Trust.

Pride said he expects the market to resume its climb as the economy improves. “I think we’ll continue to grind higher because the economic momentum is still there,” he said. “Maybe the market gets overvalued. So, sometimes a little breather is helpful.”

SURPRISE: After a dismal winter, the U.S. economy expanded at an annual rate of 4.6 percent in the spring, the fastest pace in more than two years, the government reported Friday. Some economists expect the momentum to carry through the rest of the year.

SWOOSH: Late Thursday, Nike said its quarterly net income surged 23 percent thanks to solid sales and lower taxes. Both its earnings and revenue beat Wall Street’s estimates. Nike’s stock gained $9.68, or 12 percent, to $89.41, the largest gain among the 30 big companies in the Dow.

MOVING ON: Famed bond-fund manager Bill Gross, a founder of bond giant PIMCO, is leaving to join Janus Capital. Janus said Gross, who ran the world’s largest bond fund at PIMCO, starts work next Monday. Janus soared $4.17, or 38 percent, to $15.28.

CAJOLING: An investment fund with a stake in Yahoo sent a letter to Yahoo’s CEO urging the company to consider merging with AOL. Jeffrey Smith, who heads Starboard Value, wrote that a deal could save as much as $1 billion and create a more competitive company. Yahoo climbed $1.59, or 4 percent, to $40.53.

EUROPE: Major markets in Europe were mixed. Germany’s DAX slipped 0.2 percent and France’s CAC 40 gained 0.9 percent. Britain’s FTSE 100 index picked up 0.1 percent.

CURRENCIES: The dollar strengthened to 109.10 yen from 108.56 yen in late trading Thursday. The euro fell to $1.2729 from $1.2760.

BOND MARKET: Prices for U.S. government bonds fell, nudging yields up. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.54 percent from 2.50 percent late Thursday.

METALS: In commodity trading, precious and industrial metals made slight moves. The price of gold fell $6.50 to settle at $1,215.40 an ounce. Silver slipped 10 cents to $17.54 an ounce. Copper was little changed at $3.03 a pound.

OIL: Benchmark crude oil for November delivery rose $1.01 to $93.54 a barrel on the New York Mercantile exchange.

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