TIME Somalia

Somali Militants Overrun Base for African Union Forces

The attack in the small farming town of Janale started with a suicide car bombing at the base's gate

(MOGADISHU, Somalia) — Islamic extremists overran an African Union base in southern Somalia after a firefight with troops there early Tuesday, a Somali military official said.

The attack in the small farming town of Janale started with a suicide car bombing at the base’s gate, followed by a firefight which lasted more than an hour, said Col. Ahmed Hassan.

The Islamic extremist group al-Shabab claimed responsibility for the attack, saying it had killed many troops.

Hassan told The Associated Press by phone that the militants overran the base after damaging a nearby bridge with a massive bomb to prevent troops from escaping.

There were no official details about casualties.

Despite losing most of its key strongholds in south and central Somalia, al-Shabab continues to carry out attacks on the government and African Union troops across the Horn of Africa nation.

In June, al-shabab fighters overran another African Union base in Lego, a small town in the Lower Shabelle region in southern Somalia, killing dozens of soldiers and seizing military armaments.

TIME Alaska

Obama Paints Doomsday Scene of Global Warming in Alaska

"We will condemn our children to a planet beyond their capacity to repair"

(ANCHORAGE, Alaska) — President Barack Obama is painting a doomsday scenario for the Arctic and beyond if climate change isn’t dealt with fast: entire nations submerged underwater, cities abandoned and refugees fleeing in droves as conflict breaks out across the globe.

It’s a harrowing image of a future that Obama insists is inevitable unless the world follows his and America’s lead by making sweeping cuts to greenhouse gases. Lest his sense of urgency get lost, Obama was to drive the message home on Tuesday by hiking a melting glacier in Alaska.

Obama is counting on Alaska’s exquisite but deteriorating landscape to elicit a sense of urgency that his previous calls to action on climate change have not. He opened his three-day trip to the nation’s largest state on Monday with a speech to an Arctic climate summit, calling global warming an escalating crisis already disturbing Alaskans’ way of life.

“We will condemn our children to a planet beyond their capacity to repair,” Obama said. Alluding ironically to the threat of rising seas, he castigated leaders who deny climate change as “increasingly alone — on their own shrinking island.”

Meanwhile, amid concerns that the U.S. has ceded influence to Russia in strategic Arctic waters, the White House announced Tuesday that it would ask Congress to speed up construction of new icebreakers to protect U.S. interests and natural resources. The U.S. currently has two working icebreakers, compared to Russia’s 40.

On his first day in Alaska, Obama offered no new policy prescriptions or federal efforts to slow global warming, but said the U.S. is doing its part by working to cut emissions of heat-trapping gases by up to 28 percent over the next decade. Obama set that target as the U.S. commitment to a major global climate treaty to be finalized in December, and has urged fellow leaders to make similarly ambitious pledges as works to secure a cornerstone of his environmental legacy.

Yet by turning to Alaska’s majestic mountains and stirring coastlines to make his point on climate, Obama also brought fresh attention to deep and persistent divisions in the U.S. over how to balance the nation’s energy and environmental needs.

Heavily dependent on energy revenues, Alaska is suffering economically due to the recent plunge in oil prices, a blow made all the more poignant by the fact that the cost of energy here is exceedingly high. Alaska leaders of all political stripes have implored Obama to open up more of the state to drilling to help alleviate a $3.5 billion budget deficit that has triggered steep cuts to state services — a critical lifeline for poor and rural Alaskans.

“For a population as small as we are, it’s pretty significant,” Alaska Gov. Bill Walker told reporters aboard Air Force One as he flew with Obama to Anchorage.

Yet even Obama, who has elevated global warming as a rallying point in his second term, has a complicated record on energy that has muddied his clarion call on climate.

The president has struggled to explain how his dire warnings square with steps he’s taken to expand energy production, even at the risk of higher emissions. Environmental groups took particular offense at the administration’s move to allow expanded drilling by Royal Dutch Shell off Alaska’s northwest coast — just a few weeks before Obama came to Alaska to preach on climate change.

Obama has defended those decisions by arguing that some fossil fuel development is a necessity as the U.S. undergoes a longer-term shift to clean, renewable fuels that don’t cause the planet to get warmer. But that explanation rang hollow for environmental groups, who called the Shell decision a stain on his climate legacy.

“The timing of President Obama’s trip to Alaska and the Arctic could not be more ironic, given that his administration just approved dangerous drilling plans that put the region’s well-being in serious jeopardy,” said Michael Brune, the Sierra Club’s executive director.

On a presidential trip more about powerful visuals than words, the high point was to come Tuesday when Obama flies by helicopter to Seward to hike the famed Exit Glacier, a sprawling expanse of ice in Kenai Fjords National Park that’s liquefying under warmer temperatures.

Some 700 square miles in the Kenai Mountains are blanketed by glacier ice, remnants of the Ice Age, when roughly a third of the Earth was covered with sheets of ice. One of nearly 40 glaciers springing out from Harding Icefield, Exit Glacier has been receding for decades at an alarming rate of 43 feet a year, according to the National Park Service.

After hiking the glacier, Obama planned to put his survival skills to the test while taping an episode of the NBC reality TV show “Running Wild with Bear Grylls.” Then the president was to board a U.S. Coast Guard vessel to tour the national park before returning late Tuesday to Anchorage.

TIME Kentucky

Supreme Court Rules Against Kentucky Clerk in Gay Marriage Case

Kim Davis Rowan County Kentucky Clerk
Timothy D. Easley—AP Rowan County Kentucky Clerk Kim Davis speaks to a gathering of supporters during a rally on the steps of the Kentucky State Capitol in Frankfort, Ky. on Aug. 22, 2015.

She will now have to issue same-sex marriage licenses or possibly face jail time

(MOREHEAD, Ky.) — The Supreme Court on Monday ruled against the Kentucky county clerk who has refused to issue same-sex marriage licenses, and the clerk will arrive at work Tuesday morning to face her moment of truth.

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis will have to choose whether to issue marriage licenses, defying her Christian conviction, or continue to refuse them, defying a federal judge who could pummel her with fines or order that she be hauled off to jail.

“She’s going to have to think and pray about her decision overnight. She certainly understands the consequences either way,” Mat Staver, founder of the law firm representing Davis, said on Monday, hours before a court-ordered delay in the case expired. “She’ll report to work tomorrow, and face whatever she has to face.”

A line of couples, turned away by her office again and again in the two months since the U.S. Supreme Court legalized gay marriage across the nation, plan to meet her at the courthouse door.

Davis stopped issuing all marriage licenses in the days after the landmark decision. Two gay couples and two straight couples sued her, arguing that she must fulfill her duties as an elected official despite her personal religious faith. A federal judge ordered her to issue the licenses, and an appeals court upheld that decision. Her lawyers with the Liberty Counsel filed a last-ditch appeal to the Supreme Court on Friday, asking that they grant her “asylum for her conscience.”

Justice Elena Kagan, who oversees the 6th district, referred Davis’ request to the full court, which denied the stay without comment. Kagan joined the majority in June when the court legalized gay marriage across the nation.

Meanwhile, a couple that had been turned away went to Rowan County Attorney Cecil Watkins to ask that she be charged with official misconduct, a misdemeanor defined by state law as a public official who “refrains from performing a duty imposed upon him by law or clearly inherent in the nature of his office.” The crime is punishable by up to a year in jail.

Watkins cited a conflict of interest and forwarded the complaint to Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway, whose office will decide whether to appoint a special prosecutor, generally a county attorney from a surrounding jurisdiction, who would decide whether to file charges.

As the clock wound down for Davis on Monday, the tension intensified between dueling groups of protesters outside her office window on the courthouse lawn.

Hexie Mefford has stood on the lawn waving a flag nearly every day for more than two months. The flag is fashioned after Old Glory, but with a rainbow instead of the red and white bars.

Mike Reynolds, a Christian protesting in Davis’ defense, shouted at her that he found the flag offensive: He is an Army veteran, he complained, and they had desecrated the American flag. The two groups roared at each other. The Christians called on the activists to repent; the activists countered that their God loves all.

It was a marked difference from the cordial protests that unfolded there every day since Davis declared she would issue no licenses.

Rachelle Bombe has sat there every day, wearing rainbow colors and carrying signs that demand marriage equality. One particularly hot day, Davis, the woman she was there to protest against, worried Bombe would get overheated and offered her a cold drink. In turn, Bombe said she’s checked in on Davis, whose lawyer says she’s received death threats and hate mail, to make sure she’s holding up despite the difficult circumstances.

“She’s a very nice lady, I like her a lot,” Bombe said of Davis. “We’re on the opposite sides of this, but it’s not personal.”

On Monday, the Christians stood on the grass and sang “I am a Child of God.”

The marriage equality activists chimed in after each refrain: “So are we.”

TIME climate change

Obama Focuses on Climate During Alaska Trip

"They don't get a lot of presidents in Kotzebue"

(ANCHORAGE, Alaska) — President Barack Obama brought the power of the presidential pulpit to Alaska on Monday, aiming to thrust climate change to the forefront of the global agenda with a historic visit that will put the state’s liquefying glaciers and sinking villages on graphic display.

During his three-day tour of Alaska, Obama planned to hike a glacier, converse with fishermen and tape a reality TV show with survivalist Bear Grylls — all part of a highly orchestrated White House campaign to illustrate how climate change has damaged the state’s stunning landscape. The goal at each stop is to create powerful visuals that show real-world effects of climate change and drive home Obama’s message that the crisis already has arrived.

After arriving mid-afternoon in Anchorage, Obama planned to meet with Alaska Natives before addressing a U.S.-sponsored summit on climate change and the Arctic. Later in the trip, Obama will become the first sitting president to travel north of the Arctic Circle when he visits Kotzebue — population 3,153 — to address the plight of Alaska Natives, who face dire economic conditions amid some of the worst effects of global warming.

“They don’t get a lot of presidents in Kotzebue,” Alaska Gov. Bill Walker quipped as he joined Obama for the seven-hour flight from Washington.

Aboard Air Force One, the White House unveiled a new National Park Service map bearing the name Denali where Mount McKinley used to be. As a prelude to the trip, Obama announced his administration was renaming the tallest mountain in North America and restoring its traditional Athabascan name, a move that drew applause from Alaska’s leaders but harsh condemnations from Ohio politicians angry that Ohio native and former President William McKinley’s name will be erased from the famed peak.

“You just don’t go and do something like that,” said Ohio Gov. John Kasich, a Republican presidential candidate.

As he traverses Alaska this week, Obama has two audiences in mind: Alaskans, who are hungry for more energy development to boost the state’s sagging oil revenues, and the broader public, whose focus Obama hopes to concentrate on the need for drastic action to combat global warming, including a climate treaty that Obama hopes will help solidify his environmental legacy.

Whether Obama can successfully navigate those two competing interests — energy and the environment — is the prevailing question of his trip.

The president has struggled to explain how his dire warnings and call to action to cut greenhouse gases square with other steps he’s taken or allowed to expand energy production, including oil and gas. Environmental groups took particular offense at the administration’s move to allow expanded drilling off Alaska’s northwest coast — just a few weeks before coming to Alaska to preach on climate change.

White House press secretary Josh Earnest told reporters traveling with the president that Obama’s all-of-the-above approach to energy aims to facilitate the longer-term transition to cleaner, renewable fuels. “Alaska is a place where that approach is on display,” Earnest said.

Even Alaska Natives, who have echoed Obama’s warnings about environmental changes, have urged him to allow more oil and gas to be sucked out of Alaska’s soil and waters. Alaska faces a roughly $3.5 billion deficit this year as a result of falling oil prices, forcing state budget cuts that have wreaked havoc on rural services.

“History has shown us that the responsible energy development which is the lifeblood of our economy can exist in tandem with, and significantly enhance, our traditional way of life,” leaders of the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation, which represents Inupiat Eskimo shareholders, wrote Monday in a letter to Obama.

Following his speech Monday night, Obama was to board a U.S. Coast Guard cutter on Tuesday to tour Kenai Fjords National Park and to hike to Exit Glacier, a sprawling expanse of ice that is retreating amid warming temperatures. In southwest Alaska on Wednesday, Obama will meet with fishermen locked in conflict with miners over plans to build a massive gold and copper mine in Bristol Bay, home to the world’s largest salmon fishery.

 

 

TIME Crime

White Supremacist Convicted of Killing 3 People at Kansas City Jewish Sites

Frazier Glenn Miller murder trial conviction
Shane Keyser—AP Frazier Glenn Miller Jr. argues with the court while requesting a continuance during his capital murder trial in the Johnson County Courthouse on Aug. 27, 2015, in Olathe, Kansas.

Frazier Glenn Miller could face the death penalty

(OLATHE, Kan.) — The man who admitted killing three people at two suburban Kansas City Jewish sites was convicted of murder and other charges Monday, shortly after he told jurors he hoped to “die a martyr” for the shootings.

After the jury of seven men and five women returned the verdict, Frazier Glenn Miller, 74, of Aurora, Missouri, said “the fat lady just sang.” Next, the jury will deliberate the sentence for Miller, who could face the death penalty.

During the prosecution’s closing, District Attorney Steve Howe cited a “mountain of evidence” against Miller, who is charged with capital murder in the April 2014 shootings at two Jewish sites in Overland Park, Kansas. Although he has admitted to killing the three people, he has pleaded not guilty, saying it was his duty to stop genocide against the white race. None of the victims was Jewish.

“He wants to be the one who decides who lives and dies,” Howe said of Miller.

The Passover eve shootings killed William Corporon, 69, and Corporon’s 14-year-old grandson, Reat Griffin Underwood, at the Jewish Community Center in Overland Park, and Terri LaManno, 53, at the nearby Village Shalom retirement center.

During his closing, Miller said he had been “floating on a cloud” since the killings. Earlier, he objected when Howe alleged he wanted to kill as many people as possible. Miller interjected: “I wanted to kill Jews, not people.”

Miller urged jurors to “show great courage” and find him not guilty.

“You have the power in your hands to inspire the world,” he said. “You can become a man or woman your forefathers will be proud of for your bravery.”

The proceedings were marked with frequent outbursts from Miller, who objected repeatedly while jurors were out of the courtroom during discussions about what instructions should guide deliberations. At one point, he said, “I object to everything on the grounds of George Washington, our founding father.”

The objections became so heated that Judge Thomas Kelly Ryan temporarily ejected Miller from the courtroom when Miller said he didn’t respect the process and used an anti-Semitic comment to criticize the court system. Ryan told Miller that if there were further outbursts, he would permanently eject him or declare a mistrial.

Miller groused before finally agreeing, “I will take it under advisement and try to improve.”

TIME Virginia

Family and Friends Celebrate Life of Slain TV Cameraman

The loved ones remember Adam Ward "loved life and he was truly kind to people"

(ROANOKE, Va.) — The scene inside a Virginia high school auditorium sounded more like a celebration of life Monday than a visitation after a death as the family of a cameraman who was slain on live TV greeted mourners at a hometown reception.

Adam Ward’s father, Buddy, exchanged long hugs with just about anyone he came in contact with at the stage, where the slow-moving line went past his son’s open casket. Pop music softly played on the speakers.

Salem High School opened its doors to the community to honor Ward, an alumnus. The 27-year-old cameraman for Roanoke television station WDBJ-TV, along with reporter Alison Parker, were gunned down last week by a former co-worker.

The family of Ward, a 2007 graduate of the school, asked visitors to wear colors of his favorite teams, Virginia Tech and Salem High, where he played football for the Spartans on two state championship teams. His funeral is set for Tuesday at First Baptist Church in Roanoke.

Members of Salem High’s football team, wearing the team jerseys, were among the first people to enter the school.

Salem High School Principal Scott Habeeb said Ward “loved life and he was truly kind to people.” Habeeb was the offensive line coach when Ward played middle school football, was one of his teachers as a high school freshman and was an assistant principal for Ward’s final three years of high school.

Ward’s father, Charles, is a guidance counselor at the school, which Adam chose to attend even though he lived in another district.

The Ward family had stayed out of the spotlight since the Wednesday shootings. Ward and Parker had been on an early morning assignment at Smith Mountain Lake when Vester Lee Flanagan walked up and shot them and Vicki Gardner, a Chamber of Commerce official, with a 9mm Glock pistol during a live interview. Ward and Parker died at the scene and Gardner is recovering in a hospital.

They were shot down as thousands of viewers across the central Virginia community watched and the footage quickly spread to millions on social media. Flanagan shot himself as police pursued his car. He died hours later.

Tributes to Parker and Ward quickly poured in on social media. Parker was considered a rising star at the station and had recently moved in with her boyfriend, WDBJ anchor Chris Hurst.

Ward was engaged to morning show producer Melissa Ott, who had recently gotten a job in Charlotte, North Carolina. She was celebrating her last day working in Roanoke when the shooting happened. Ward and Ott, of Gibbstown, New Jersey, were planning to get married in July 2016.

“Adam, I will never find a man so happy, selfless, protective, funny, or charming like you. You were the one. You understood me. My soulmate. I will always love you. Please watch over me and keep me strong. Enjoy the endless tech games in your heaven. I love you so much,” Ott wrote in a Facebook post.

Pictures of the couple frequently show them at football games, which Ward loved to attend when he wasn’t playing tennis. Even when cheering for Ott’s alma mater, Penn State, pictures show Ward continued to wear a Virginia Tech hat with a Penn State shirt. He graduated from Virginia Tech in 2011 with a degree in communication.

“Adam was the one with the painted chest in 20 degree weather screaming the loudest from the end zone,” his obituary says.

In 2013, Ward took a picture of himself donating blood the week of a Virginia Tech football game against arch rival Virginia, noting the blood’s resemblance to one of the school’s official colors.

“Its fact. I bleed chicago maroon. #beatuva,” Ward said in a Tweet.

The only other school that rivaled his love for Virginia Tech was Salem High.

Friends have described Ward as especially close with his parents, and he and his father were scheduled to cover Salem High football games for WDBJ on Friday night before the shootings occurred.

“I don’t know if there has ever been another person who better embodied what it meant to be a Spartan than Adam Ward. To know him was truly to love him. His smile was the brightest; his heart was the biggest; his enthusiasm was the most contagious; his work was the hardest. Adam was without a doubt the easiest-to-like kid who ever walked the halls of SHS,” Habeeb wrote on Facebook.

TIME Election 2016

State Department to Release 7,000 Pages of Hillary Clinton Emails

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Charlie Neibergall—AP Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks a news conference at the Des Moines Area Community College on Aug. 26, 2015, in Ankeny, Iowa.

About 150 of the released pages are censored for classified information

(WASHINGTON) — The State Department will release roughly 7,000 pages of Hillary Rodham Clinton’s emails Monday, including about 150 emails that have been censored because they contain information that is now deemed classified.

Department officials said the redacted information was classified in preparation for the public release of the emails and not identified as classified at the time Clinton sent or received the messages. All the censored material in the latest group of emails is classified at the “confidential” level, not at higher “top secret” or compartmentalized levels, they said.

“It’s somewhere around 150 that have been subsequently upgraded” in classification, State Department spokesman Mark Toner told reporters.

Still, the increasing amounts of blacked-out information from Clinton’s email history as secretary of state will surely prompt additional questions about her handling of government secrets while in office and that of her most trusted advisers. The Democratic presidential front-runner now says her use of a home email server for government business was a mistake, and government inspectors have pointed to exchanges that never should have been sent via unsecured channels.

Toner insisted that nothing encountered in the agency’s review of Clinton’s documents “was marked classified.”

Government employees are instructed not to paraphrase or repeat in any form classified material in unsecured email.

Monday evening’s release will amount to more pages of email than released in the previous three months combined. Once public, it will mean roughly a quarter of all of the correspondence Clinton qualified as “work emails” has been published. Clinton provided the State Department some 30,000 pages of documents late last year, while deleting a similar amount from her server because she said they were personal in nature.

TIME Theater

David Bowie Has Written a Song for the SpongeBob SquarePants Musical

Nickelodeon

John Legend, Cyndi Lauper, Dirty Projectors, and the Flaming Lips have also written tunes

(NEW YORK) — There’s a “SpongeBob” musical in the works but the music is no kiddie stuff.

Nickelodeon said Monday it will produce the world premiere of “The SpongeBob Musical” in Chicago next summer with original songs from John Legend, David Bowie, Cyndi Lauper, Dirty Projectors, The Flaming Lips, T.I., Plain White T’s, They Might Be Giants, Lady Antebellum, Panic! At the Disco, and Aerosmith’s Steven Tyler and Joe Perry.

It is co-conceived and directed by Tina Landau with a book by Kyle Jarrow and music supervision by Tom Kitt. The show will play Chicago’s Oriental Theatre starting June 7 with an eye to Broadway.

Producers call it “a rousing tale of a simple sea sponge who faces the unfathomable. It’s a celebration of unbridled hope, unexpected heroes, and pure theatrical invention.”

Kids’ material has made the leap to stage before, including “The Addams Family,” ”Annie” and “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.” And writer, director and producer Adam McKay is currently working on an “Archie” musical.

TIME Crime

Ambushed Houston Sheriff’s Deputy Was Shot 15 Times, DA Says

Shannon J. Miles is charged with capital murder and held without bond

HOUSTON — A man charged with killing a suburban Houston officer first shot the 10-year veteran in the back of the head and fired a total of 15 times, authorities said Monday.

Shannon J. Miles, who is accused of capital murder and whose criminal record includes convictions for resisting arrest and disorderly conduct with a firearm, appeared briefly in state District Court in handcuffs and shackles. The 30-year-old Houston resident said little, other than to answer the judge’s questions. He’s being held without bond.

Harris County District Attorney Devon Anderson would not comment on a motive, saying investigators were still trying to figure that out. When asked if it might be connected to heightened tensions around the country between law enforcement and civilians, Anderson said, “I have no idea whether it does or not.”

This weekend, Sheriff Ron Hickman said the attack was “clearly unprovoked,” and there is no evidence Goforth knew Miles. “Our assumption is that he (Goforth) was a target because he wore a uniform,” the sheriff said.

Anthony Osso, one of Miles’ two court-appointed attorneys, told The Associated Press that his client intends to plead not guilty.

“He had indicated to the investigating officers that he was not involved in the case,” Osso said in a telephone interview after Monday’s hearing.

Osso said Miles’ defense team is distancing itself from the sentiments expressed by the sheriff, the district attorney and others.

“What I want to do is investigate the case and defend my client based on the facts of the case and not opinion in the public eye or rhetoric that’s espoused on social media. It’s difficult enough to handle these types of cases,” Osso said.

In court, Anderson read the probable cause statement, saying that police first received a call at 8:20 p.m. Friday. When authorities arrived at the gas station in the Houston suburb of Cypress, they found Deputy Darren Goforth, face-down. He was already dead, she said.

Surveillance video from the gas station showed Goforth, 47, had just come out of a convenience store after he had pumped gas and that Miles got out of his red truck, she said.

“He runs up behind Deputy Goforth and puts the gun to the back of his head and shoots. Deputy Goforth hits the ground and then he continues to unload his gun, shooting repeatedly into the back of Deputy Goforth,” Anderson said.

Goforth was shot 15 times and a witness saw the shooting, Anderson said. She added that the shell casings match the .40-caliber Smith and Wesson handgun found at Miles’ home.

Miles’ next court date is Oct. 5.

The killing evoked strong emotions in the area’s law enforcement community, with Hickman linking it to heightened tension over the treatment of African-Americans by police. Goforth was white and Miles is black.

The nationwide “Black Lives Matter” movement has sought sweeping reforms of policing. Related protests erupted in Texas recently after Sandra Bland, a black woman, was found dead in a county jail about 50 miles northwest of Houston three days after she was arrested on a traffic violation.

“We’ve heard Black Lives Matter, All Lives Matter. Well, cops’ lives matter, too,” Hickman said Saturday.

Houston Police Lt. Roland De Los Santos, a childhood friend of Goforth’s, called the deputy a “simple guy” who was focused on providing for his family, noting that Goforth’s wife is a teacher and the couple has a 12-year-old daughter and a 5-year-old son. Goforth’s funeral is planned for Friday, he said.

Miles’ criminal record stretches from 2005 to 2009, with three convictions for resisting or evading arrest, as well as convictions for disorderly conduct with a firearm, criminal mischief and giving false information to police. Records show he was sentenced to several short stints in jail, anywhere from six to 10 days.

___

Associated Press writers Seth Robbins in San Antonio and Alan Scher Zagier in St. Louis contributed to this report.

TIME Football

Tom Brady and NFL Fail to Reach ‘Deflategate’ Settlement

Patriots QB could be forced to sit out four games

(NEW YORK) — Last-minute settlement talks between lawyers for NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady have failed, leaving a judge to decide the fate of “Deflategate.”

Federal Judge Richard Berman announced at a conference in Manhattan on Monday that both sides tried hard to reach a deal during the morning but failed.

He says he expects to rule as early as Tuesday whether Brady must serve a four-game suspension to start the season for his role in using underinflated footballs during the playoffs last season.

Goodell upheld the suspension in July, saying Brady colluded with two Patriots ball handlers to deflate balls before New England routed the Indianapolis Colts in January’s AFC championship game. The NFL Players Association wants the suspension nullified.

The Patriots then won the Super Bowl.

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