TIME How-To

How to Hide Anything on Your iPhone

TIME.com stock photos Social Apps iPhone
Elizabeth Renstrom for TIME

You have a right to privacy. Here’s how to protect it.

The eyes may be the window to your soul, but your iPhone is the peephole into your daily life. Who you contact, which apps you use, which selfies you snap — it’s all right there. So if you care about your privacy, it’s worth taking some simple steps to protect it. Here are seven ways to keep digital snoops at bay.

Pair Touch ID With a Complex Password

If you’re already using your fingerprint to unlock your iPhone, you’re on the right track. (If not, tap Settings >Touch ID & Passcode and add it now.) Here’s another trick: add a complex password to enter each time you power up your phone. (Tap Settings > Touch ID & Passcode, disable Simple Passcode and follow prompts). For a stronger passcode that’s quick to enter, stick to all numbers and aim for up to 12 digits. That won’t stop a dedicated hacker, but it’s tougher for an unwanted onlooker to figure out than a standard 4-digit password.

Nix the Notifications on Your Lock Screen

Hide your notifications by going to Settings > Notifications and toggling off the Show on Lock Screen slider. Alternately, you can also fine tune this setting so that only certain apps can place notifications on your lock screen using the options right below this setting. You can even block notifications from individual message threads: go into the message, tap the word Details on the upper right hand corner of your screen and slide the Do Not Disturb Button to the left. Voila.

Hide Clandestine Contacts

There’s no built-in setting for hiding individual contacts, but there are some smart workarounds. The simplest way is never to save the person’s name so only their number appears in your recent calls list. To hide all your recent and favorite contacts in the App Switcher – which appears atop your screen when you press the home button twice – tap Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars > Contacts > Show in App Switcher and toggle off Phone Favorites and Recents.

Deep-Six Secret Texts

This one’s easy – just delete them. Swipe left on the Messages screen to delete entire exchanges at once. If you only want to nix certain parts of a thread, hold your finger on the offending text bubble, tap More when it pops up, select each bubble you want to delete using the check marks at left, then tap the trash icon at the bottom left of your screen.

Zap Photos and Videos

Here’s one case when you’re better off using a third-party app instead of the iPhone’s built-in option. While you can hide any photo from your camera roll by holding your finger on it, then selecting Hide, the Hidden Album is not password-protected. Instead, try a free app like KYMS or Private Photo Vault, which require a password to access. Just remember to permanently delete the originals from the default iPhone photo app afterwards.

Make Apps Disappear

Don’t want anyone who borrows your phone to know you’re on Tinder or have a Private Photo Vault? There are two ways around this. First, you can hide apps inside another folder like your “Extras” by holding down the app icon until it starts shaking, then dragging it into the desired folder. Second, you can hide app icons altogether by dragging them into the dock, then using Spotlight to access it. Get a detailed explanation for how to do both tricks here.

Hide Your Search History in Safari

If you just want to browse privately for a while, open Safari, tap the page icon in the lower right corner, then tap Private. To clear your entire browser history, go back to your phone’s home screen, tap Settings > Safari > Clear History and Website Data. Pro tip: download the DuckDuckGo search engine and use it instead. Unlike Safari, it never stores your search history.

TIME Diet/Nutrition

A Guide to What Kind of Eggs You Should Buy

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Andy Roberts—Getty Images/OJO Images RF

Here's what you're really getting when you buy cage-free, vegetarian or the new California-certified varieties

Whether you like your eggs sunny side up or hard-boiled, deciphering the claims on the carton has never been such a scramble. You’ve already seen everything from “organic” to “Omega-3-enriched.” Now, there’s a new designation that debuted on January 1, when California began requiring all eggs sold there to come from hens with room to move around without bumping into each other. While the law technically applies only to the Golden State, the new labeling is already popping up on eggs sold across the country.

No matter which variety of egg you choose, remember that all are good sources of protein (6g per) as well as choline and lutein, which promote brain and eye health, respectively. There’s no nutritional difference between brown and white eggs, and you can eat one—or two, depending on who you ask—per day, yolks included, without running up your cholesterol. (Check out “Should I Eat Eggs?” for more on this.)

Here’s your cheat sheet to popular label claims, some of which come with legal definitions and health benefits—and some of which do not.

“Omega-3″: This label claim comes when these fatty acids, linked to heart, brain and eye health, are fed to hens in the form of flaxseed, algae or fish oil. A regular egg has about 30mg of Omega-3s, while an “enriched” one can have as much as 350mg. “That might make it a tad healthier,” says Keri Gans, RD, a dietitian in New York, “but you are probably better off eating lots of fish, nuts and seeds.” While the FDA regulates egg labeling and requires truthfulness, it typically only checks if there is a complaint.

Organic: These eggs must come from uncaged hens that have access to the outdoors and are fed a diet grown without synthetic pesticides or fertilizers. Unlike most other label claims, which are voluntary and without strict legal definition, USDA certification for organic eggs is mandatory for producers with more than $5,000 in annual sales. Farms get inspected regularly for compliance. “Organic does mean something,” says Pat Curtis, a poultry scientist at Auburn University.

Vegetarian: This voluntary label means that the hens are not fed any animal protein and have a diet typically consisting of corn and soybeans. Interestingly, free-range chickens are unlikely to be 100% vegetarian because birds are scavengers, notes Purdue University poultry scientist Todd Applegate. That means they will naturally seek out worms, bugs and larvae found outdoors. That’s why, the Humane Society says, “This label often signifies that the hens spend no time outside foraging.”

Cage-Free: Chickens raised in cage-free environments stay indoors but have unlimited access to food and water. “They can be packed in as tightly as on the subway, but they are not in a cage,” notes Gans. While no federal regulations define how much space cage-free chickens get, industry groups such as the United Egg Producers offer voluntary certifications requiring that each bird has at least one square foot of space – more than twice as much as hens in standard “battery cages” – along with perches and nesting areas for laying eggs.

Free-Range: “These chickens have a shelter but can go outside,” explains Mayo Clinic dietitian Katherine Zeratsky. There are no regulations on how long the birds stay outside—just that they can if they want to. Free-range hens with eggs that are “Certified Humane,” meanwhile, must have access to at least two square feet of outdoor space for up to six hours a day. And while free-range eggs were shown in a study to have slightly higher Omega-3 levels (thanks to those worms and insects they forage outside), “the difference would have no impact whatsoever on humans,” notes study author Ken Anderson of North Carolina State University.

California Shell Egg Food Safety Compliant: Enacted on January 1, the new state regulation means that eggs sold in California must come from hens that have enough room to lie, stand, turn around and spread their wings without touching another bird. State farm inspectors check cage sizes and animal control officers can cite violations, which are misdemeanors. Cartons may use the abbreviation “CA SEFS COMPLIANT” to indicate compliance.

Pasture-Raised: There’s no federal regulation for the term “pasture-raised,” but many farmers who use this claim appear to raise their birds in lush, open spaces. Whereas free-range birds may get only a few feet of outdoor space, pasture-raised hens get more than 100 square feet each on fields where they can forage on plants and insects. Nutritionally, however, pasture-raised eggs have not been shown to be any different from factory-farmed ones.

TIME Exercise/Fitness

5 Tricks to Get More From Your Fitness Tracker

The Jawbone UP3, on sale in early 2015, will incorporate heart rate monitoring. Jawbone

You won't get healthier just by strapping on the new Jawbone. You need to learn how to game the system too

If you’re counting on using a new fitness tracker from Jawbone, Fitbit, Microsoft or the like to help get in shape for 2015, you may want to adjust your expectations: “We don’t know whether or not these devices really make people more active or healthier,” says Glenn Gaesser, an Arizona State University professor and Director of the Healthy Lifestyles Research Center. “There really is no evidence.” Still, even as some people complain of gaining unwanted weight after they started wearing a fitness tracker, many more say their gadgets are just what they need to move around more—and when you consider many Americans spend upwards of seven or eight hours a day on their tush, that’s a very good thing.

But since the devices are not a fast-track to fitness all on their own, we asked experts for tips on how to make the most of them—despite their shortcomings:

1. Assume at least a 10% margin of error for calories burned.

A recent Iowa State University study found that trackers’ calorie-burn estimates were off by 10-15%, on average. Anyone who wants to lose weight would be wise to assume that trackers are overestimating their efforts, suggests Kristin Kirkpatrick, a registered dietitian at Cleveland Clinic. “You only need to consume an extra 500 calories a day to gain a pound a week,” she warns, so it’s smart to err on the side of caution.

2. Realize that calorie-burn estimates can be completely off. Enter them yourself.

Unless your tracker includes a built-in heart-rate monitor (like the Microsoft Band, Jawbone UP3 and Basis Peak), it will grossly underestimate how many calories you burn during many activities, including biking, weight training and yoga, because its built-in accelerometer can’t as readily detect the movement. A 2013 study in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise found that trackers underestimate energy expenditure from cycling, for example, by up to 55%. “They don’t work as well on resistance exercises,” says the study’s co-author Ray Browning of Colorado State University. Even bands with heart rate monitors are imperfect because they don’t perfectly capture your radial pulse, especially during intense exercise when you are moving your wrist a lot.

3. The buddy system can be a double-edged sword.

Jawbone reports that its users who have at least 3 “teammates” with whom they share their activity data take 1,000 steps per day more than those who don’t. Fitbit, meanwhile, claims that users with at least one friend on their system take 27% more steps. Fitbit friends can also take challenges such as the “Work Week Hussle”—which tracks your steps for a week and awards a virtual trophy to the winner. But Colorado State researcher Browning points out that the motivating effect from being part of a group only works when you’re winning. As an alternative, consider setting short-term goals that build on your own baseline activity level instead. An increase of 20%, for example, is a good start.

4. It’s still on you to follow through.

An activity tracker can be fun to play around with for a few months. But it’s easy to get bored, take it off your wrist and never pick it up again. Ultimately, your motivation must come from within. “These devices get you thinking about [fitness], but in the end, it’s your decision,” says John Jakicic, Director of the Physical Activity and Weight Management Research Center at University of Pittsburgh.

5. It’s not all about structured exercise.

Trackers may be the best way to quantify how much energy you spend on routine activities like puttering around the house or taking out the garbage—movement that can be as, or more, important for overall health than formal exercise. “Getting up and moving the rest of the day is better for you than just exercising once a day and being sedentary the rest of the time,” says University of Pittsburgh’s Jakicic. Do enough of these activities, and you may be surprised to see how it all adds up—no marathon-running required.

TIME Books

A TV Thanksgiving Dinner: Recipes Inspired by Your Favorite Shows

Channel your TV-watching into an original holiday meal with recipes based on Orange Is The New Black, Downton Abbey and other hit shows

If the stress of holiday cooking makes you want to curl up on the couch and binge watch old episodes of Portlandia, you can combine your fondness for addictive TV-watching with your desire to eat a decent holiday meal. Here’s a menu made up of recipes from new cookbooks based on some of your favorite shows. (After all, what soooort of rhymes with Kardashian? Tryptophan.)

 

 

  • FIRST COURSE

    Nick Briggs

    Cream of Watercress Soup

    From A Year in The Life of Downton Abbey, by Jessica Fellowes

    If you’re counting down the days until the January 4th season premiere, this photo-packed cookbook may help ease the wait. Nestled between hints about the upcoming season and behind-the-scenes shots are 24 classic British recipes, including one for this elegant soup.

    3 ½ tablespoons butter
    1 large onion, peeled and chopped
    1 large leek (white part only), washed and sliced
    1 large potato, peeled and chopped
    Salt and pepper
    3 cups hot chicken stock or water
    9 cups watercress, de-stalked and chopped (can substitute sorrel or spinach)
    Large pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
    ⅔ cup light cream

    Melt the butter in a heavy-based saucepan, then add the onion, leek and potato and stir to coat them in the butter. Season with salt and pepper, turn the heat to low and let the vegetables sweat with the lid on for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. When the vegetables are tender, add the hot stock or water. Bring back to the boil, then add the watercress and cook for a further 5 minutes. Season with salt, pepper and nutmeg. Take the pan off the heat and liquidise the soup. Stir in the cream and pour into bowls to serve. Serves 4.

    Copyright © 2014, reprinted by permission of St. Martin’s Press, LLC.

  • SECOND COURSE

    Shrimp Saganaki

    From The Portlandia Cookbook, by Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein with Jonathan Krisel

    The show that lovingly parodies all things Portland has spawned an eclectic collection of recipes for foodies and freegans alike, such as this variation on sautéed shrimp.

    ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    1 large onion, thinly sliced
    Crushed red pepper flakes
    1½ pounds ripe plum tomatoes, peeled and coarsely chopped with seeds
    1½ pounds cleaned and deveined medium shrimp
    ½ cup (about 3 ounces) pitted kalamata olives, coarsely chopped
    Kosher salt
    ¼ cup chopped fresh dill
    6 ounces Greek feta, crumbled

    In a large skillet, heat the oil over high heat until shimmering. Add the onion and red pepper flakes and cook over high heat, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes and cook until softened, crushing with the back of a wooden spoon, about 5 minutes longer. Add the shrimp and olives and season with salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the shrimp are curled and cooked through, about 3 minutes. Stir in half the dill and half the feta and cook just until the cheese is heated through, about 1 minute. Transfer to plates, sprinkle with the remaining dill and feta, and serve with crusty bread. Serves 4 to 6.

  • THE MAIN EVENT

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    finearts

    Pennsatucky’s Family Beer Can Bird from Orange Is the New Black Presents: The Cookbook, by Jenji Kohan and Tara Hermann

    Remember when Crazy Eyes went nuts in the cafeteria and hurled a piece of pie at Alex? Now you can make that same dessert and 50 other treats to remind you of the funniest/saddest/craziest moments at Litchfield prison—including the entree to your TV dinner.

    For the rub:
    2 teaspoons dry mustard powder
    2 teaspoons smoked paprika
    1 teaspoon garlic powder
    1 teaspoon onion powder
    1 teaspoon dried thyme
    1 teaspoon dried oregano
    1 teaspoon ground cumin
    1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    2 teaspoons salt
    ½ teaspoon ground cayenne

    One 12- to 14-pound (5.5- to 6.25-kg) free-range turkey
    1 medium chunk of smoking wood, such as apple wood
    One 24- or 25-ounce (740-ml) can of beer

    Fire up a smoker or grill to 325F (160C) on one side. In a small bowl, combine all the rub ingredients. Remove and discard the neck and giblets from the turkey. Rinse the turkey under cold water and pat dry with paper towels. Rub the cavity with about 1 tablespoon of the rub. Using your fingers, gently separate the skin from the meat underneath the breasts and around the thighs. Spread about 1 tablespoon of the rub under the breast and thighs. Open the beer can and pour yourself about one third of the beer. Make a few more openings in the can using a can opener and leave the rest of the beer in the can. Add about 1 tablespoon of the rub to the beer can. Sprinkle the remaining rub into the cavity of the turkey and all over the turkey, inserting it under the skin.

    When the grill comes up to temperature, add the wood chunk. When the wood ignites and starts to smoke, place the beer can on the grill over the unheated portion. Carefully lower the turkey onto the beer can, legs down. Adjust the legs so the bird is stable on the grill. (If it’s hard to get it to stay stable, you could place the bird, beer in butt, in a roasting pan before placing it on the grill.) Cover and smoke until an instant-read thermometer registers 160F (70C) in the thickest part of the breast, 2 to 3 hours. Remove the turkey from the smoker, place it on a carving board, and let it rest for about 20 minutes. Remove the beer can, carve, and serve.

  • SIDE DISH

    Herbed Garlic Bread from In the Kitchen With Kris, by Kris Jenner

    Even if you can’t afford a personal chef or Hermès china for your celebrity offspring, you can still get a taste of the Kardashian life. Here’s an amped-up garlic bread recipe to go with dinner:

    6 garlic gloves, minced
    2 teaspoons olive oil
    4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature
    ¼ cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
    ¼ cup finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
    2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh oregano
    2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh thyme
    Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
    1 large, elongated crusty bread, such as ciabatta, cut in half horizontally

    Preheat over to 350°F. Heat the garlic and olive oil together in a small skillet over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, until the garlic is tender but not browned, about 2 minutes. Scrape the mixture into a medium bowl and let cool completely. In the same medium bowl, combine the Parmesan, parsley, oregano, and thyme. Using a rubber spatula, mash the mixture together until combined. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Divide and spread the herb mixture on the cut sides of the bread. Wrap the loaf in a double thickness of aluminum foil. Bake for 20 minutes. Open up the foil and continue baking until the loaf is crisp, about 5 minutes, Cut into 1-inch wide slices and serve warm. Makes 8 to 12 servings.

  • DESSERT

    Blue Meth Crunch from Baking Bad, by Walter Wheat

    How did Walt get his bake so pure? You won’t learn Heisenberg’s secret recipe in this hilarious (and drug-free) parody cookbook inspired by Breaking Bad. But you will find novelties like Mr. White’s Tighty Whitey Bites, Ricin Krispie Squares and this blue rock candy:

    ½ cup (118ml) water
    ¾ cup (177ml) light corn syrup
    Do not use chili powder. It’s for amateurs
    14 ounces (350g) granulated sugar
    2 teaspoons (10ml) peppermint extract
    Blue gel food coloring
    You will need a candy thermometer

    Line a baking tray with aluminum foil, or use a heatproof glass tray. Spray with non-stick baking spray. Find yourself a decent accomplice. Underachieving ex-students are a good choice, though psychologically fragile. In a medium saucepan, combine the water, corn syrup and sugar. Stir the mixture over medium heat until the sugar dissolves, then turn up the heat to bring to a boil. Stop stirring and insert the thermometer and use a pastry brush dipped in water to wet the sides of the pan (this will prevent crystals forming). Cook the mixture until the temperature reaches 285F(140C). Immediately remove the pan from the heat and take out the thermometer. Let the mixture stand until all the bubbles have stopped forming on the surface.

    At some point you’re going to need a distributor. But don’t worry about that now. Add a few drops of peppermint flavoring and enough blue color to give the correct Blue Meth hue. Quickly pour the mixture onto the baking tray, lifting the tray from side to side to spread the mix. Don’t worry if it’s not perfectly smooth or has holes in it. Let the candy cool to room temperature. Once the candy has cooled, use a hammer to break it up. Put into little plastic baggies or serve as is, whichever your clients prefer.

    All recipes reprinted with permission.

TIME relationships

15 Guys Explain Why They Date Women Over 30

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Tom Merton—Getty Images/OJO Images RF

Here's why older is better in some men's eyes

We’ve all heard the sobering statistics: given a choice, straight men of all ages would rather date women in their twenties. Women, on the other hand, prefer guys closer to their own age. In September, a study of 12,000 Finns reaffirmed what prior research had already established.

But there’s something fishy about all that data. If dudes were really so set on their caveman-era mating habits, wouldn’t we see more single ladies over 30 home knitting tea cozies on Friday nights? (Then again, just because a guy wants to date a younger girl, doesn’t necessarily mean she wants to date him!)

As a woman over 30, I decided to try to get to the bottom of this conundrum by asking a series of straight, unmarried men in their 20s, 30s, 40s and 50s to find out why some actually prefer to date “older” women. Turns out, there’s lots to love about women of a certain age.

Men in their 20s date women over 30 because:

“They understand better how to interact in a relationship.”
— José Fernández, 24 (single)

“I appreciate the grace and expression of slightly older women. Certain facial features, like smile lines, can be charming.”
— Niv, 25 (single)

“They know what they want. There is more of an end game. So if you meet their criteria, they’re good.”
— Billy, 27 (has a girlfriend)

“I think women in their 30s are in their prime. Sexual maturity, the way that they carry themselves — for me something about it screams woman.”
— Alex Sanza, 28 (single)

“They are more stable.”
— Solomon, 29 (just started seeing someone over 30)

While men in their 30s say:

“Generally more expert at the multisensory/theatrical aspects of the whole dance.”
— Anonymous, 30 (single)

“Much better sex”
— Anonymous, 32 (actively dating)

“When I was in my 20s, I was drawn to older women because it gave me a certain level of confidence because she was established. She’s not as needy.”
­— Peter Bailey, 34 (“not married”)

“More nurturing.”
— Percy Baldonado, 38 (single)

Men in their 40s add:

“Women over 30 have stopped putting metal through their lips and tongues which makes it easier to kiss them. And they’ve figured out their makeup routine so they won’t keep you waiting as long when you’re trying to get to an event.”
— Anonymous, 49 (seeing someone)

“Age has never really played a role in who I date … I have dated my own age, younger than me, and older. What it comes down to is, I like this girl, she’s cute, and I’d like to see her again.”
— Chris Dinneen, 41 (in a relationship)

“I always liked somewhat older women for their maturity, self confidence and poise, finding those qualities quite attractive and usually absent in younger girls.”
— Daren, 45 (in a long-term relationship)

And men in their 50s prefer women over 30 because:

“We have similar life experiences and similar pop culture references. It’s a little more comfortable.”
— David, 50 (seeing someone, not exclusive)

“Given that I’m 52, I can’t really relate to dating someone in her 20s — too much of an age difference.”
— Patrick, 52 (single)

TIME society

Portland Plans Tiny Houses for the Homeless

Homeless in the Pearl
A person walks by the Right 2 Dream Too homeless camp in Portland, Ore. on Oct. 4, 2013. Don Ryan—AP

Designed to give residents greater privacy and independence than traditional shelters, the micro homes may persuade people who currently live in Portland's "tent cities" to relocate to the sturdier structures

With an estimated 2,000 of its residents sleeping under bridges, on streets and in empty lots in a variety of makeshift shelters, the city of Portland, Oregon, is on a quest to provide more safe housing for those without a permanent address. Thinking beyond typical dorm-style shelters, it has launched a task force that will meet September 4th “to assess the viability of using tiny homes as a potential for housing houseless people,” says Josh Alpert, Director of Strategic Initiatives for Mayor Charlie Hales. Alpert hopes the first batch of homes will be ready for occupancy by late February 2015.

The mayor’s office began looking into the idea of micro homes in June after housing advocate Michael Withey presented an idea to the city council based on designs by architecture firm TechDwell. Alpert says he envisions a pilot program in which up to ten structures are erected on four separate city-owned lots. The idea is to establish the micro communities in various neighborhoods “so that no one area is feeling overburdened,” Alpert adds.

TechDwell

The tiny houses will be selected through a request-for-proposals process and will hinge on two key factors: cost and the ability to meet city and county building codes. Tim Cornell of TechDwell, who has already met with Alpert to discuss his prototype, says he can deliver micro homes that sleep two people and have bathrooms and kitchens built-in for $20,000 each. His FlexDwell prototype (shown at right) measures 16 feet wide and 12 feet deep and features a sloped ceiling that is 12-ft. high in front. Made of prefab materials available at Home Depot and Lowe’s, it includes two sleeping pods joined by a kitchen, bathroom and eating area. To save space, the bathroom shares a sink with the kitchen. “We could have them built on-site in 45 days” after an order is placed, Cornell says.

Because the tiny houses offer dwellers more privacy than big shelters, they may appeal to people who are reluctant to give up the sense of independence that comes from living on the street. The micro homes could also be cheaper than temporary emergency shelters, which cost up to $16,000 a year and lack plumbing.

“If there is a potential to get even one person off the streets, it’s worth trying,” says Alpert. “Simply having a roof over their head may enable them to springboard into finding a job.”

TIME U.S.

Not Too Cool For School: Tufts Offers Class on Hipsters

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Getty Images

Grab your trucker cap and pop open a Pabst Blue Ribbon. A new class on hipsters will teach you everything you need to know to become one. (Actual hipsters need not enroll.)

College is fraught with all kinds of anxiety, not the least of which is social. Now Tufts University in Massachusetts has found a way to combine fear of failing your classes with fear of not being cool in a single, one-credit course called “Demystifying the Hipster.”

Taught by professor Jackie O’Dell, the class will examine everything from film and fashion to art and literature in order to decipher just what makes a hipster a hipster. “Students will become critics and sociologists of today’s hipster culture as they explore how hipster identity reflects larger cultural anxiety,” according to the course description.

While hipsterdom may seem like a modern-day phenomenon (or affliction, depending on your perspective), the term itself has been around since the early 1900s. Long associated with Harlem jazz culture, hipsters were also known as “hepcats” through the 1940s. Jazz singer Cab Calloway’s Jive Dictionary, published in 1939, defines “hip” as “wise, sophisticated, anyone with boots on.” Even Norman Mailer weighed in on the matter with his 1957 essay, “The White Negro: Superficial Reflections on the Hipster,” which is required reading for the Tufts course.

But since trying to be cool automatically disqualifies you from actually being cool, we suspect all this diligent dissection of the topic won’t turn “A” students into hipsters. At best, they’ll just be groupies. And there’s nothing hip about that.

TIME technology

Remote-Controlled Robots Let You Explore Tate Britain at Night Without Leaving Home

After Dark project robot with Jacob Epstein's The Visitation (1926) at Tate Britain Alexey Moskvin—Alexey Moskvin

Great way to beat the crowds

Fancy a trip to the Tate but can’t cross the pond anytime soon? No worries, the venerable British museum is letting anyone with a (Chrome) browser roam its galleries without the pesky crowds or security guards dampening the experience.

Just one catch: you can only do it in the dark. Starting tonight at 5 p.m. Eastern (10 p.m. London time), visitors around the globe can log on to the Tate After Dark website and explore the Tate Britain’s collection using internet-controlled robots. (Think Roomba with a webcam at eye level). The four robots — which were designed and engineered by the London-based consultants The Workers with help from space research firm RAL Space — let remote users explore five centuries worth of British art, ranging from Elizabethan portraiture to video works by Gilbert & George, currently on display.

“It’s about getting lost in the museum,” says Tommaso Lanza, who co-created the five-night interactive event, which runs through Sunday. “It’s also about fun.”

Each of the four robots has seven sonar sensors on board, an off-the-shelf webcam and a hardware encoder. The bots have no sense of direction, so it will be up to the users to navigate the dimly-lit space. “The whole point is that you control it,” using nothing but the arrow keys on your keyboard, says Lanza.

Even if you don’t get a chance to “drive,” you can still join in via a livestream on the Tate website here.

TIME food & driink

Cronut King’s Latest Creation Looks Like a Pretzel Bear Claw

Courtesy Dominique Ansel Bakery

Dominique Ansel unveiled his $8 pretzel lobster tail on national TV

Updated August 8 at 11:30a.m.

Have the cronut king’s novelty pastries jumped the shark? We’ll find out sometime before dawn on Saturday, when the line starts forming outside Dominique Ansel’s Soho bakery for his latest oeuvre: the pretzel lobster tail.

Introduced on Good Morning America Thursday, the $8 invention is comprised of pretzel dough wrapped around a buttercrunch-peanut butter filling and comes with a warm dipping sauce made from whipped honey and browned butter. The entire concoction is “sprinkled liberally” with Maldon sea salt.

Sounds delicious. But ever since Ansel captivated us with his doughnut-croissant hybrid last spring, his subsequent novelties — the waffogato, the frozen s’mores — have been a lot less thrilling. And then there’s the dubious move of announcing the new pastry on national TV, which has already prompted one food writer to implore, “Please stop distracting from all that by appearing on national television to introduce pastries like they’re the next iteration of the iPhone … You’re better than that. ”

Not that we’d turn our nose up at the chance to try one.

Update: Dominique Ansel heard my plea and invited me to his bakery to try the pretzel lobster tail one day before it goes on sale. What surprised me most was the generous amount and distinctive taste of the peanuty brittle filling. (Ansel told me the nuts are caramelized and salted before they are ground down into a butter.) And there was so much dipping sauce that I brought some home to spread on toast later. The verdict: tasty, and extremely filling.

TIME Food & Drink

This Magical Tree Grows 40 Different Types of Fruit

Sam Van Aken, Courtesy of Ronald Feldman Fine Art

Using an ancient grafting technique, Sam Van Aken's Tree of 40 Fruit can bear dozens of stone fruit varieties

Add this to your truth-is-stranger-than-fiction file: an art professor in upstate New York is modifying plum trees so that each can bear not just one, but up to 40 varieties of stone fruit.

In what feels like the backdrop for a children’s tale — move over James and the Giant Peach; this is the real Giving Tree Sam Van Aken of Syracuse University has developed a years-long technique that involves grafting buds from various antique, heirloom and native fruit trees onto the branches of a base tree to create one-of-a-kind hybrids. As he explained in a recent TEDx Manhattan talk, “I take a sliver off one of the trees that includes the bud, I insert it into a like-size incision in the working tree, tape it, let it sit and heal in all winter, then I prune it back and hope that it grows.” The result: a single tree that bears 40 varieties of peaches, plums, apricots, nectarines and cherries.

Sam Van Aken

“It started as an art project. I wanted people to have this experience where a tree is blossoming in all these different colors or growing all these different kinds of fruit all at once,” Van Aken told TIME. As he began researching the various stone fruits available, however, he learned that there were literally hundreds that aren’t in stores because of their size, color or short shelf life. That led to the project evolving into a conservation effort for hard-to-find varieties. Among his favorite: Greengage plums, which came to the U.S. from France and look like Granny Smith apples.

Van Aken plans to use proceeds from the trees, which he sells for around $30,000 each, to create an orchard that will serve as an archive of native an antique stone varieties. He’s also growing a small grove of the trees in Portland, Maine, where the trees — and their abundant harvests — will be available to the public. Since it takes nine years to graft branches from 40 different fruit trees onto each base tree, chances are Van Aken’s creations won’t end world hunger. But they might get you to think twice about the fruit you eat next time to you bite into a peach.

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