TIME royals

See The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Meet the King and Queen of Hip Hop

Prince William and Kate Middleton met Beyoncé and Jay Z during the Brooklyn Nets game last night

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge met Beyoncé and Jay Z at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn on Monday night, as LeBron James (“King James”) led the Cleveland Cavaliers to victory against the Brooklyn Nets.

Nobody fainted during the encounter, which lasted for just a few minutes between the 3rd and 4th quarter of the game. Neither Blue Ivy nor Baby George were in attendance, but after their parents met, could there be a playdate in their future?

Put on some sunglasses before you view these pictures– the star wattage could damage your corneas.

TIME portfolio

Documenting Drug Addiction in Kabul

It took 12 visits for photographer Souvid Datta to gain the trust of drug users in Kabul, Afghanistan

Following his recent graduation from the University College of London, Souvid Datta’s first assignment was in Kabul, Afghanistan. In between his time photographing scenes of contemporary Afghan life, the 23-year-old photographer set out to work on a personal project, documenting heroin addiction in the country Afghanistan.

In Kabul, the Pul-e Sukhta bridge has become the meeting point for hundreds of drug dealers and addicts. Datta struggled, at first, to gain their trust, but, after numerous failed attempts with various fixers, Datta tried a new technique.

“I started going back alone, trying to speak to addicts above and around the bridge in Urdu,” he says. “I did this without my camera out.” It’s only after his 12th visit that he started bringing his camera out with him.

In a country ravaged by decades of war, more than one million of Afghans, rich and poor, are addicted to drugs, according to a United Nations report. “Narcotics are becoming a sad kind of equalizer in the sense that you get middle class government workers, mothers, students, and the very poor people from the streets all going down under this bridge to use drugs,” says Datta.

After meeting and documenting some of these drug users, Datta followed Afghan National Police officers and visited a treatment clinic in Kabul where people are offered therapy and given food, clothes and medication. Yet, he says, because of a lack of resources, there’s no follow-up in terms of employment opportunities and counseling. “As soon as people leave, they relapse. That’s no more obvious than in the center itself where you see people coming in for their fourth or fifth time.”

Souvid Datta is documentary photographer based in London.

Adam Glanzman is a contributor to TIME LightBox. Follow him on Twitter @glanzpiece

TIME On Our Radar

Ride Along With America’s Marshal Officers

When he’s not shooting for publications around the world, photographer Brian Finke makes the time to work on long personal documentary projects. His most recent one, called U.S. Marshals, takes an intimate look into the lives of those serving in the U.S. Marshal service, the oldest law enforcement agency in the country.

Finke’s interest in the U.S. Marshals came from re-connecting in 2010 with Cameron Welch, a current Marshal and friend from high school. The encounter led him to spend the following three years on regular embeds with the U.S. Marshals in more than a dozen U.S. cities.

“It’s pretty amazing watching them do what they do,” says Finke. “It was kind of like my own version of the TV show ‘Cops,’ putting a bulletproof vest on and running in behind them as they go catch the bad guys.”

As part of a law enforcement agency, the Marshals are responsible for transporting criminals, protecting judges and witnesses, as well as tracking down some of the most dangerous fugitives in the country.

“I never felt like my life was in danger,” says Finke, despite the often-precarious situations he and his assistant found themselves in – his very first ride-along with the Marshals included a 120-MPH pursuit of an escaped convict in Texas.

Finke started his photographic career as a black-and-white shooter. Today, it is easy to spot the documentary photographer’s bright, saturated work in his color images, which he developed using an off-camera flash. “Flash exaggerates the color and makes it all come together for me,” he says.

Finke will continue to use his off-camera flash technique in his next in-depth project, which focuses on the women who star in hip hop music videos, he calls this body of work “Hip Hop Honeys.”

“I love the process of photography,” Fink says. “Being out in the world and experiencing things, I feel very fortunate to be able to do this.”


Brian Finke is documentary photographer based in N.Y. and his book US Marshals is published by powerHouse Books 

Adam Glanzman is a contributor to TIME LightBox. Follow him on Twitter @glanzpiece 


TIME space

A New View of Jupiter Reveals ‘Eye’ of its Storm

A close-up view of Jupiter reveals a creepy 'eye.'
A close-up view of Jupiter reveals a creepy 'eye.' A. Simon—Goddard Space Flight Center/ESA/NASA

Jupiter is keeping an eye on the other planets in the solar system

Earlier this year the Hubble Telescope made this eerie image of what appears to be a hole in Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, commonly referred to as GRS, which almost resembles an eye.

The ‘hole,’ it turns out, was actually just a well-timed shadow, captured by one of Hubble’s cameras as Jupiter’s moon Ganymede passed by.

GRS is a massive, ongoing storm within Jupiter’s atmosphere that would be similar to a hurricane on earth. The red spot may appear relatively small from our vantage point, but is so large that three earths could fit within its boundaries.

However, the Great Red Spot may not be so fearsome in years to come, as scientists have observed the spot’s decline in size since the 1930’s.

Read next: 20 Breathtaking Images Of The Earth As Seen From Space

TIME space

Stunning Images Of Galaxy Clusters Teach Scientists About Star Birth

Chandra observations of the Perseus and Virgo galaxy clusters suggest turbulence may be preventing hot gas there from cooling
Chandra observations of the Perseus and Virgo galaxy clusters suggest turbulence may be preventing hot gas from cooling. CXC/Stanford/NASA

Turbulence is preventing star formation

It seems that the stars have aligned in the world of astronomy.

In a new study, researchers found that galactic turbulence may prevent the formation of new stars in outer galaxy clusters, which are the largest objects in the universe held together by gravity, existing at temperatures upwards of a million degrees.

Scientists have long wondered why these massive clusters have not begun to cool and form stars.

“We knew that somehow the gas in clusters is being heated to prevent it cooling and forming stars. The question was exactly how,” said lead researcher Irina Zhuravleva, of Stanford University.

According to Zhuravleva, the heat is being “channeled” through turbulence within the cluster. This movement is what maintains the cluster’s high temperature, preventing star formation.

TIME space

See a Comet’s Close Encounter With Mars

This composite image captures the positions of comet 'Siding Spring' and Mars in a never-before-seen close passage of a comet by the Red Planet, on Oct. 19, 2014.
This composite image captures the positions of comet 'Siding Spring' and Mars in a never-before-seen close passage of a comet by the Red Planet, on Oct. 19, 2014. PSI/JHU/APL/STScI/AU/ESA/NASA

A comet flew past Mars this week and NASA captured the encounter

The comet known as “Siding Spring” had a too-close-for-comfort encounter with the Red Planet this week.

Traveling at around 125,000mph, the comet missed colliding with Mars by a mere 87,000 miles. That’s about one-third of the distance between the Earth and the Moon — in astronomical terms, a very close encounter.

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope captured the encounter in this composite image. Sadly, it will be another million years before we see comet Siding Spring again, after it completes its orbit around the sun.

See an artist’s rendition of the encounter in the video below:

TIME Interview

Meet Harlem’s ‘Official’ Street Photographer

Khalik Allah, a 29-year-old filmmaker and photographer who documents the streets of Harlem at night, has been photographing the corner of 125th and Lexington since 2012; armed with little more than a manual camera and a few rolls of film.

Street photography can often be a daunting or awkward experience – especially when you’re trying to photograph people who might be skeptical of what you are doing and why. However, for this street artist, photography is an immersive experience where he has built hundreds of relationships with members of the community.

One of the methods Allah uses to gain access to the lives of so many people is to show them a book of his past photographs, a technique learned from one of his influencers, photographer Bruce Davidson.

“Carrying a book of 4×6 prints for people to see has given me entry [in the lives] of some of the most hardcore people in the world. They can relate to that,” Allah says. “That helped me build a tighter bond with the community.”

Once given permission, the Harlem-based photographer will often tell his subjects to picture something meaningful while posing for a portrait. “I’ll tell a person that I stop in the street to think about something that they went through in their life that was difficult and project that through their eyes,” says Allah, who describes himself as a spiritual photographer tasked with helping people heal through photography.

“I tell people that my camera is a healing mechanism,” Allah says. “Let me photograph it and take it away from you.”


Khalik Allah is street photographer based in Harlem, N.Y.

Adam Glanzman is a contributor to TIME LightBox. Follow him on Twitter @glanzpiece


 

TIME space

See 2 Astronauts During Their 6-Hour Spacewalk

Astronaut Alexander Gerst while on a spacewalk outside of ISS on Oct. 7, 2014.
Astronaut Alexander Gerst while on a spacewalk outside of ISS on Oct. 7, 2014. ESA

More than 200 miles away from earth, 2 astronauts left the confines of their floating home

European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst went on his first spacewalk Tuesday with NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman. Working in the moonlight, the duo spent a total of six hours and 13 minutes outside of the International Space Station cleaning and repairing various aspects of their floating home. The astronauts were tethered to the space station during their outing and had a few minutes to take some photographs, some of which were later posted to social media.

Another spacewalk is scheduled to take place next week, the Associated Press reports. Wiseman and fellow American Butch Wilmore will be venturing out of the station to perform more maintenance work.

Want to see more of these astronauts? Watch TIME’s Jeff Kluger interview Reid Wiseman, Steve Swanson, and Alexander Gerst from the International Space Station

[AP]

TIME On Our Radar

Go Underwater with a Camera from the 1960s

What started out as a small experiment with a few old film cameras from the 1960s has now turned into a much larger project and sparked a revival and love for underwater film photography.

The Nikonos camera, invented in 1963, was one of the first commercially available underwater cameras; early models of the Nikonos were co-designed by the famous aquanaut and explorer Jacques Cousteau.

The camera is no longer manufactured, but it can easily be found secondhand on eBay at around $100. For someone looking to get involved in underwater photography without spending hundreds of dollars on underwater housing for a digital SLR, this old film camera is one of the best options available.

Brandon Jennings is the mastermind behind the Nikonos Project, a crowd-sharing experiment designed to make it easier for photographers to use one of the famed film cameras.

Jennings’ first experience with film photography took place three years ago when he became “fed-up” with digital technology, which he says, took the personal touch out of the photographic process. “With film it just felt like there was more of an art involved, knowing you only had one shot and one roll of film,” Jennings tells TIME.

Since then, Jennings’ chain of camera exchanges has allowed him to share his love of film photography with more than 250 individuals worldwide.

The idea is simple. Starting with a mere eight cameras, Jennings sent the old Nikonos’ to a few photographers around the world to see what they could come up with. After the first round of cameras were shipped out of Jennings’ basement, a journal was added as a means to document each photographer’s experiences with their new camera. Each Nikonos recipient was then instructed to pass the camera on to the next person on the wait-list.

Eventually, Jennings plans to compile the images and stories from all of his Nikonos users into a book.

In the meantime, however, his stockpile of Nikonos cameras has increased to nearly 100, and already 700 people are on the waiting list. “We’re just looking for someone to have a good time, and to learn,” Jennings tells TIME. “It’s a good reminder that life isn’t so fast, that everybody can take their time and enjoy.”


Brandon Jennings is the creator of the Nikonos Project

Adam Glanzman is a contributor to TIME LightBox. Follow him on Twitter @glanzpiece

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