TIME Germany

Angela Merkel’s Party Slumps in Berlin Elections

Angela Merkel, Germany's chancellor and Christian Democratic Union (CDU) party leader, left, reacts as she stands with Frank Henkel, the CDU candidate in Berlin, ahead of a CDU federal board meeting at the party's headquarters in Berlin, Germany, on Monday, Sept. 19, 2016.
Krisztian Bocsi—Bloomberg/Getty Images Angela Merkel, Germany's chancellor and Christian Democratic Union (CDU) party leader, left, reacts as she stands with Frank Henkel, the CDU candidate in Berlin, ahead of a CDU federal board meeting at the party's headquarters in Berlin, Germany, on Monday, Sept. 19, 2016.

Berlin is now expected to get its first left-wing triple coalition

The political party of German Chancellor Angela Merkel suffered a humbling night at the ballot box in Berlin on Sunday, as the far-right party Alternative fur Deutschland (AfD) secured a political foothold during the city’s regional elections.

Support for Merkel’s center-right Christian Democratic Union (CDU) fell to a record 17.5%, while coalition party SPD came out top with only 21.6% of the vote, the Guardian reports. Berlin is now expected to get its first left-wing triple coalition of SPD, the Greens and either the the Left party — who came third on 15.7%— or the liberal Free Democrats (6.7%).

The anti-immigrant AfD, which won 21% in Merkel’s home state of Mecklenburg Vorpommern, will enter Berlin’s state parliament for the first time after gaining 14.1% of the vote. According to the Financial Times, it fell short of AfD’s target of 20% of the vote.

This is the fourth blow for Merkel’s CDU, who have faced three earlier defeats in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Rhineland-Westphalia and Baden–Württemberg.

 

 

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