This Portrait of point guard Jerron Love is an interesting picture and one of my favoritesbecause I heard of him through Youtube, watching him destroy grown men on the basketballcourt, so after talking to a friend of mine, myself and Jerron spent alot of time together, not onlycreating portraits of him, but also following him all summer to photograph every game he playedon the streetball courts in NYC.
A portrait of point guard Jerron Love on June 05, 2015. Jerron and I spent a lot of time together, not only creating portraits of him, but also following him all summer of 2015 to photograph every game he played on the streetball courts in New York City.Anthony Geathers
This Portrait of point guard Jerron Love is an interesting picture and one of my favoritesbecause I heard of him through Youtube, watching him destroy grown men on the basketballcourt, so after talking to a friend of mine, myself and Jerron spent alot of time together, not onlycreating portraits of him, but also following him all summer to photograph every game he playedon the streetball courts in NYC.
Opening night is where you know that school is out for the year, you got off work and the sun is still out and you want to come get some food and watch some exciting basketball to kick the summer off. It’s a beautiful sight to see an ocean of black folks from all over Brooklyn come out and enjoy some basketball.
This photo was from the high school portion of the Tournament of Champions game Nikehosted at the Barclays Center last summer. I wasn’t even supposed to shoot at the court, due tothe rules, but I broke the rules and wound up shooting the game. On that hot, August Saturday,myself and the rest of Brooklyn watched the best of the best high school ballers put on aperformance at the Barclays Center to show who is top dog, and of course, it wouldnt beexciting without some monster dunks.
If you ever are at “ The Cage” on West 4th Street almost everyday, you will see this gentleman with the same megaphone sitting on a high chair with the audience commentating on every game, providing play by play action, and color commentary. He makes sure that each team carries themselves like professional athletes, although trash talking is allowed.
This picture was shot from outside of “the Cage” during a high school division game. Everytime I go to The Cage, I’m always putting my vision in how I see the game and everytime on thecourt at The Cage, its always a battle going on and what better way to contain that with a fencearound the whole court to give it that colllesium look, where the gladiators would go and dobattle in front of the people.
Since I’ve been shooting this sport on the ground level away from the bright lights, I notice that for the black coaches that run the different teams out here in New York City. It’s more than just about coaching players in a game. It’s about mentorship, being that father figure, giving each player the confidence and mental toughness to not only succeed on the courts, but in life in general.
Another key thing about streetball..the art of breaking ankles and making your opponent looklike a fool attempting to guard you from scoring. This is where you tell your teammates to backoff while you clown your opponent, and that’s exactly what happened when I was photographingJerron Love play in the Bronx my first time shooting him in action. He toyed with his opponent,doing crossovers, behind the legs dribbling. It brought memories back of me watching AllenIverson crossing over damn near anybody he playing against in the NBA.
The coaches for both high school and Pro teams in New York City are very passionate about the game and wanting the players as, mostly, black men to take this sport and succeed both on and off the court.The coaches for both high school and Pro teams in New York City are very passionate about the game and wanting the players as, mostly, black men to take this sport and succeed both on and off the court.
A playoff game at Gersh Park In East New York in Brooklyn. By far one of the most energetic streetball courts in New York City. Lots of trash talking, and the community admiring their favorite players.
If you go back in the youtube archives and watch the And 1 mixtapes, one of the things thatmakes streetball exciting besides the crossovers and long range shooting is the monster layupsand dunks, so when I’m shooting streetball, one of my goals it to pay homage to those momentsI became a fan of since I was a youngster always watching night games in Brooklyn during thesummer.
a pickup game at Brower Park in Brooklyn from this year’s firstday of summer. Having a love and appreciation for basketball, I’m always trying to find a way ofshooting something different I haven’t done before to pay respects to the game and to show my love for it.
A portrait of point guard Jerron Love on June 05, 2015. Jerron and I spent a lot of time together, not only creating por
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Anthony Geathers
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Celebrating New York City's Streetball Culture

In New York City, if there's one thing that signifies summer, it's streetball. Known for its high energy and aggressive playing style, streetball is defined by Oxford dictionary as an "informal type of basketball played especially in urban areas such as parking lots, playgrounds, etc." Some of New York City's legendary courts, including Rucker Park and the West Fourth Street Courts, also known as "The Cage," have been a home for aspiring NBA stars to develop their skills, with stars including Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Wilt Chamberlain and Kyrie Irving. In June 2016, Kevin Durant, Klay Thompson and other members of the U.S. Olympics men's basketball team stopped by Rucker Park to surprise a group of young fans, prior to competing in the 2016 Rio Summer Olympics.

Over the past two summers, photographer Anthony Geathers began documenting streetball as part of an ongoing series. "I just shoot what I love and streetball happens to be one of those things," he says. "It's great, because you get these guys that play on a high level, but have a showmanship about them." From 2008-2012, Geathers served in the Marines Corps and did two combat tours in Afghanistan as a machine gunner. Prior to joining the Marines, Geathers developed an interest in photography in high school, learning different film formats and darkroom techniques. After his service ended, Geathers decided that he wanted to continue his passion: "I still had photography in the back of my head, I still loved it." In 2012, he enrolled as a student at New York City's School of Visual Arts, which served as a platform to expand his perspective and knowledge of photography's history.

Regarding influences, Geathers' biggest role model, particularly on his streetball series, has been notable photographer and Shaft director Gordon Parks. "He really got knee deep in the photograph and the subject," Geathers reflects. "I approach it with the same kind of mindset. I don't just shoot the game, but shoot everything else [that's] around." Whether it be sneaker trends, hair styles, or how fans react, Geathers strives to capture each little moment and feeds off the energy of the players and spectators: "You get connected to the street more, more to the people, especially during the summertime."

Geathers photographs each game from a variety of spots around the court; some of his favorites include underneath the basket, or utilizing the fence around a court for framing. Gersh Park in Brooklyn's East New York neighborhood remains one of the photographer's favorite courts to shoot at, because of its throwback factor to streetball's earlier days. "As a kid, I always admired basketball, being raised in Brooklyn and being a fan of basketball culture in NYC, I just felt that I had to come back and shoot that." Geathers often gives prints to the players to show their families, which is especially important to them if they have children. Each photo acts as a unique memory.

"These guys are high-level players, but they're also entertainers," Geathers says. "If anything, I think they play a little better when the camera's in their face."

Anthony Geathers is a photographer based in New York City.

Elijah Sinclair Walker is a freelance photo editor at TIME.com

Kenneth Bachor is TIME’s associate photo editor, overseeing entertainment and culture.

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