Aaleksander—Getty Images
By Melissa Chan
May 24, 2016

People in California would be allowed to smash car widows to save trapped pets, without the fear of being sued, under a proposed bill.

The measure, known as Bill 797 or “The Right to Rescue Act,” was set to be introduced in the California Assembly on Tuesday. It would protect passersby who leap into action from facing a civil lawsuit, ABC News reports.

“All the time we hear about animals that are dying being trapped in hot cars. These owners, they just don’t realize how hot it can get,” Assemblyman Marc Steinorth, who is one of three lawmakers who drafted the bill, told the Sacramento Bee. “I wanted to create legislation that enables us to be proactive.”

Before taking action, bystanders would first have to confirm the car is locked and that there’s no “reasonable method” available other than forcible entry, according to the Bee. They’d also have to believe the dog is in imminent danger, contact authorities and then wait for them to arrive.

[Sacramento Bee]

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