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Iggy Azalea Responds to Mackelmore’s ‘White Privilege’ Criticism

Rappers Iggy Azalea (L) and Macklemore attend the 2014 iHeartRadio Music Festival Village on September 20, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Kevin Mazur—WireImage Rappers Iggy Azalea (L) and Macklemore attend the 2014 iHeartRadio Music Festival Village on September 20, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Azalea might have preferred a face-to-face convo

Macklemore‘s tackling white privilege, and he’s got a lot of targets in his crosshairs.

The rapper released his newest song with Ryan Lewis, “White Privilege II,” and it contains a series of diss lines aimed at musicians with a history of appropriating black culture.

“You’ve exploited and stolen the music, the moment,” he raps at one point. “The magic, the passion, the fashion, you toy with / The culture was never yours to make better.”

“You’re Miley, you’re Elvis, you’re Iggy Azalea,” the verse continues. “Fake and so plastic, you’ve heisted the magic/ You’ve taken the drums and the accent you rapped in/ You’re branded ‘hip-hop,’ it’s so fascist and backwards.”

Azalea, who’s frequently been held up as a poster child for cultural appropriation in the music industry, responded on Twitter.

“He shouldnt have spent the last 3 yrs having friendly convos and taking pictures together at events etc if those were his feelings,” she wrote.

“White Privilege II” features Chicago poet-vocalist Jamila Woods and clocks in at nine minutes long while touching on the Black Lives Matter movement and racial inequality in America. It will appear on Macklemore and Ryan Lewis’ new album, This Unruly Mess I’ve Made, currently slated for a Feb. 26 release.

This article originally appeared on People.com

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