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In this Dec. 10, 1964, file photo, U.S. civil rights leader Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King receives the Nobel Peace Prize from Gunnar Jahn, chairman of the Nobel Committee, in Oslo, Norway. (AP Photo, File)
U.S. civil rights leader Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King receives the Nobel Peace Prize from Gunnar Jahn, chairman of the Nobel Committee, in Oslo, on Dec. 10, 1964. AP

Listen to a Rare Recording of Martin Luther King's 1964 Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Jan 18, 2016

A rare audio recording of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s 1964 Nobel Peace Prize Lecture has been made widely available in its entirety for the first time since King delivered the speech in Oslo, Norway.

King, who gave the lecture on Dec. 11, 1964, received the prize for his work toward ending against racial segregation and accepted it on behalf of the Civil Rights Movement. Unlike the text version of the speech that has previously been published, the audio of King's lecture ends with King quoting the same spiritual he references in his famous "I Have a Dream" speech: "Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”

Rare recording: Martin Luther King, Jr.’s 1964 Nobel Lecture –...

BIG NEWS! On #MLKDay we’re humbled and overjoyed to be able to share Martin Luther King, Jr.’s voice with the world. Today on Facebook we’re releasing a rare audio recording of Dr. King’s 1964 Nobel Peace Prize Lecture. This is the first time in history this speech has been made available in its entirety to a global audience since Dr. King originally delivered it in Oslo, Norway over 51 years ago.“One of his most important speeches”, comments Dr. Clayborne Carson, Director of The King Institute at Stanford University, on the lecture. ”It lays out his goals for the remainder of his life. He also addresses the problems of racial injustice, poverty and war as global evils rather than specific American problems.”The recording dates from 11 December 1964, and in contrast with the previously published text version, it finishes with Dr. King echoing his ‘I Have a Dream’ speech for equality and freedom: 'Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”Dr. King was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his nonviolent campaign against racial segregation, a Prize which he accepted on behalf of the civil rights movement. The Nobel Lecture is a requirement for the Nobel Prize. A Nobel Lecture has been held by all Laureates – with very few exceptions – since the first Nobel Prizes were awarded in 1901.More facts on MLK at NobelPrize.org: http://goo.gl/GuqdV4

Posted by Nobel Prize on Monday, January 18, 2016

In a statement, Clayborne Carson, the director of the King Institute at Stanford University, called the lecture one of King's "most important speeches." "It lays out his goals for the remainder of his life," he said. "He also addresses the problems of racial injustice, poverty and war as global evils rather than specific American problems.”

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