President Barack Obama meets with Prince Harry in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C., 28 Oct. 2015.
Win McNamee—EPA
By Simon Perry / People
October 29, 2015

On Wednesday, Prince Harry followed his older brother Prince William in having an audience with President Barack Obama at the Oval Office.

While Prince William spoke about the plight of endangered elephants and rhinos in Africa during his White House meeting last December, Harry was promoting his campaign to help wounded veterans.

The former British Army captain, who completed two tours in Afghanistan, is on a one-day visit to D.C. to launch his paralympic-style Invictus Games, which will take place in Orlando, Florida, in May.

Earlier on Wednesday, he spent time with First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden, both of whom are big backers of veterans’ welfare.

Speaking at Fort Belvoir in Virginia, Harry, 31, discussed tackling the stigma behind many of the issues faced by wounded service members.

“One thing we have to talk about more is breaking down these barriers around so-called invisible injuries, like post-traumatic stress, just as we have for physical injuries like the loss of a limb,” he said.

“This is a topic I know the First Lady and Dr. Biden are working hard to highlight so that people are no longer afraid to ask for help. This fear of coming forward, as a result of the stigma which surrounds mental health, is one of the greatest challenges veterans face. People from all walks of life struggle with issues like post-traumatic stress, anxiety, and depression, not just veterans.

“We have to help them all to get the support they need, without fear of being judged or discriminated against. Not only is it okay to talk about it, we have to talk about it.”

Harry has devoted much of his public life to helping those he has served alongside. Last month, he spent time with six ex-armed service members who are walking 1,000 miles around Britain.

And he is expected to welcome that crew into Buckingham Palace on Sunday.

“What’s important is to recognize that the mental health support for these guys, former servicemen and women, is there,” he told PEOPLE in September. “They have served their country. They have put their lives on the line for their country.”

This article originally appeared on People.com

SPONSORED FINANCIAL CONTENT

You May Like

EDIT POST