Pete Rose Gambled on Baseball as a Player, Report Says

Jun 22, 2015

Newly obtained documents indicate Pete Rose, the all-time Major League Baseball leader in hits, bet on baseball while he was a player, according to a new report that bats against his 26-year denial of doing so.

ESPN's Outside the Lines reports that the documents—copies of pages from a notebook of Michael Bertolini, a previous associate of Rose—refutes Rose's past claims that he only placed bets while he was a manager on the Cincinnati Reds—never as a player. Even that admission came after nearly 15 years of denials; Rose was banned for life from the league in 1989.

The notebook seized from Bertolini's home covers March to July 1986, with documentation that for at least 30 different days, Rose gambled on at least one MLB team. On 21 of those days, the report notes, Rose bet on the Reds' games—many of which he was playing in.

Read more at ESPN's Outside the Lines.

After umpire William Grieve issues a walk to a Washington pinch-hitter, Red Sox manager Joe McCarthy and catcher Birdie Tebbetts express their doubts about Grieve's judgment, 1949.
After umpire William Grieve issues a walk to a Washington pinch-hitter, Red Sox manager Joe McCarthy and catcher Birdie Tebbetts express their doubts about Grieve's judgment, 1949.Michael Rougier—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
After umpire William Grieve issues a walk to a Washington pinch-hitter, Red Sox manager Joe McCarthy and catcher Birdie Tebbetts express their doubts about Grieve's judgment, 1949.
University of Pittsburgh students cheer wildly from atop the Cathedral of Learning as they look down on Forbes Field, where the Pittsburgh Pirates are playing the Yankees in the 7th game of a Series that would enter baseball lore when Bill Mazeroski smacked a 9th-inning, game-winning home run.
Yankee pitcher Don Larsen talks to the press after throwing a perfect game — still the only perfect game in postseason history — against the Dodgers in the 1956 World Series.
Brooklyn Dodger rookie hopefuls work out at spring training, 1948.
Jackie Robinson, the great disruptor, dances off of third in the 8th inning of Game 3 of the 1955 World Series.
Roy Campanella (left) talks with a young, awed fan during spring training in 1959.
Red Sox star Ted Williams, all of 22 years old, demonstrates his batting technique in 1941.
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Dodger southpaw and 1955 World Series MVP Johnny Podres reads about his own and his teammates' exploits while visiting a store in his hometown of Witherbee, New York — a small mining town in the Adirondacks, a few hundred miles north of Brooklyn.
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Leroy "Satchel" Paige, ageless relief pitcher for the Cleveland Indians, watches his teammates practice in 1948.
A rapt audience in a Chicago bar watches the 1952 Subway Series between the Yankees and Dodgers in 1952.
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Baseball great Jackie Robinson during filming of "The Jackie Robinson Story."
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After umpire William Grieve issues a walk to a Washington pinch-hitter, Red Sox manager Joe McCarthy and catcher Birdie
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Michael Rougier—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
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