By Eliza Berman
May 22, 2015

On Thursday, Josh Duggar, the eldest of the 19 siblings on the TLC reality show 19 and Counting, resigned from his post at the Family Research Council amidst allegations of child molestation. In a statement to PEOPLE, Duggar confirmed that the allegations are true, saying that he is deeply regretful for his actions as a teenager.

In the wake of Duggar’s statement, focus has shifted to TLC, which has yet to make a statement about whether 19 and Counting will continue to air. On Thursday night, as the controversy picked up steam, TLC aired a marathon of the show, causing a minor uproar on social media. On Friday afternoon, the network removed the show from its schedule but still hadn’t confirmed what the future holds in store for the series. As the show’s fate hangs in the balance, many are calling for TLC to permanently cancel it—lodging comparisons to another TLC series, Here Comes Honey Boo Boo, which was pulled in 2014 under similar circumstances.

For insight into what might happen to 19 and Counting—notwithstanding the question of what should happen—here’s a look at the fates of several other TV shows that came under fire when a star became embroiled in allegations of sexual abuse and assault.

Here Comes Honey Boo Boo: The Toddlers & Tiaras spin-off, which centered on the sassy child beauty pageant star Alana “Honey Boo Boo” Thompson, ran for four seasons before TLC canceled it, in 2014, in response to allegations that Alana’s mother June was dating a man convicted of child molestation.

As details surfaced, the allegations were confirmed; Alana’s older sister Anna had been the victim. The man, Mark McDaniel, had already served 10 years in prison after pleading guilty to aggravated child molestation. TLC had filmed a fifth season of the series, which remains unaired.

7th Heaven: In 2014, seven years after the final episode of the WB family drama—which aired from 1996 until 2007—the New York Police Department began investigating actor Stephen Collins, the show’s fictional patriarch. The police had obtained a recording of a man, alleged to be Collins, confessing to having sexually abused a minor. Two months later, Collins disclosed to PEOPLE that he had, in fact, had “inappropriate sexual conduct with three female minors.”

The television network UP, which had been airing reruns of 7th Heaven since 2012, pulled the series immediately after the allegations surfaced. UP quietly began showing the series again in 2014 in response to requests from viewers, but quickly pulled it. In a statement, the network explained its on-again, off-again relationship with the show: “We brought the show back because many viewers expressed they could separate allegations against one actor from the fictional series itself, as it turns out they cannot.” Collins was never prosecuted due to the expired statute of limitations on all of the incidents.

Bill Cosby 77: Bill Cosby had a long list of credits to his name—from the long-running Cosby Show to Cosby to hosting Kids Say the Darnedest Things—before the allegations of rape and sexual assault began accumulating. More than 40 women have levied accusations against the comedian since 2000, with incidents reportedly dating back to 1965.

In 2014, media attention increased significantly, due in part to the comedian Hannibal Buress remarking on the allegations in a stand-up routine. Following a number of new accusations, a stand-up comedy special called Bill Cosby 77 slated to air on Netflix was postponed indefinitely just ten days ahead of its release. Netflix made the announcement on the same day that model Janice Dickinson accused Cosby of rape.

CeeLo Green’s The Good Life: In 2012, singer, producer and then-coach of The Voice CeeLo Green was accused of sexual assault, leading to a lengthy police investigation. The following year, he pleaded not guilty to a felony charge of providing a controlled substance to the woman involved in the sexual assault controversy, though no charges were brought for the assault itself. Despite his checkered past, TBS green-lit a reality show starring Green, CeeLo Green’s The Good Life, which premiered in June 2014. But when Green took to Twitter to express a slew of controversial opinions about rape and consent, TBS canceled the show.

Read Next: What the Josh Duggar Fiasco Can Teach Us About Pedophilia

 

Write to Eliza Berman at eliza.berman@time.com.

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