Ebola in Sierra Leone for the Washington Post
Pete Muller, Aug. 26, 2014. Sengema, Sierra Leone."The rain started shortly after a small team of Red Cross burial workers approached the body. The deceased man, reportedly in his mid-sixties, collapsed and died outside his remote home more than a day before the burial team arrived. Having received instructions from officials that bodies of Ebola victims are extremely contagious, his family members placed a sheet over his body, marked a cordon in the sand, and called the Red Cross. With approximately 20 burial workers serving all of Kailahun district, an area the size of Rhode Island and rife with Ebola, the team had a backlog of cases. His family endured the presence of his body, laying prone and exposed to the elements, for more than 24 hours. As the team removed the sheet, the stench of death filled the air. The white cloth around the man’s head was crimson with blood. As burial workers sprayed him with chlorine, family members erupted with emotion. I was moved imagining how I might respond if I were in the situation. To me, this picture represents the range of Ebola’s emotional impact. In the two women, we see the devastation and loss that the virus causes. In the faces of the men, we see a sense of despondence, disbelief and suspicion that also defines the response. It was a difficult but necessary picture to make."Pete Muller—Prime for the Washington Post
Ebola in Sierra Leone for the Washington Post
Body removal team preps a body to be removed from the West Pont facility.
Idrissa-koruma, a 35 year old man, the husband of Baindu-koruma a 28 year old woman, grives her death of Ebola deadly virus.
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Pete Muller, Aug. 26, 2014. Sengema, Sierra Leone."The rain started shortly after a small team of Red Cross burial worke
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Pete Muller—Prime for the Washington Post
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Inside the Ebola Crisis: The Images that Moved them Most

As the Ebola crisis continues to develop, TIME asks ten photographers working on the ground to reflect on their experiences covering the outbreak—and to describe which of their own photographs moved them most.

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