Chicago, Video Gaming, Robert Morris University
Jonathan "McSleuthBurgur" Lindahl, 19, a freshman in computer networking, practices League of Legends and other video games in the video game practice space of Robert Morris University's athletic department in Chicago, March 18, 2015. The university recognizes video games as a varsity sport under its athletic department and has been offering sports scholarships to video gamers to play League of Legends. The team practices four to five nights a week in a $100,000 classroom outfitted for video gaming.Kitra Cahana—Getty Images Reportage for TIME
Chicago, Video Gaming, Robert Morris University
Chicago, Video Gaming, Robert Morris University
Chicago, VideoChicago, Video Gaming, Robert Morris University Gaming, Robert Morris University
Chicago, Video Gaming, Robert Morris University
Chicago, Video Gaming, Robert Morris University
Chicago, Video Gaming, Robert Morris University
Chicago, Video Gaming, Robert Morris University
Chicago, Video Gaming, Robert Morris University
Chicago, Video Gaming, Robert Morris University
Chicago, Video Gaming, Robert Morris University
Jonathan "McSleuthBurgur" Lindahl, 19, a freshman in computer networking, practices League of Legends and other video ga
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Kitra Cahana—Getty Images Reportage for TIME
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Meet America's First Video Game Varsity Athletes

Mar 27, 2015

Correction appended, March 27, 2015

Parents who think that video games are an academic distraction, take heart: pounding on the controller can now help pay for college.

Last fall, Robert Morris University in Chicago became the first college in the US to make competitive gaming ­ or "e-sports" ­ a varsity sport, and offer athletic scholarships for players. "My parents were always telling me to get off the Xbox," says Jonathan Lindahl, a freshman e-sports player at Robert Morris. "So I'm really rubbing it in their faces."

At Robert Morris, video game scholarships can be worth up to half of tuition and housing, or $19,000. What's more, since the NCAA doesn't regulate e-sports, they're not bound by the rules of amateurism. A couple of Robert Morris players, for example, recently played in a semi-pro tournament and each earned around $1,000. Want to get paid as a college athlete? Stay on the Xbox.

Robert Morris spent $100,000 ­and received help from video game sponsors ­ to retrofit a classroom into a full-fledged gaming hub with hi-tech monitors, headsets, and chairs. The players look a bit like fighter pilots, and play League of Legends, a five-on-five battle game popular among college students. The top Robert Morris team has qualified for Sweet 16 of the North American Collegiate Championship (NACC), which starts on March 28: traditional sports powers like Michigan, Georgia Tech, Texas A&M are also in the mix. The "Final Four" will be held in Los Angeles in early May. Each member of the winning team will receive $30,000 in scholarship money.

A sure sign that college video games are like traditional sports: one member of the Robert Morris squad, freshman Adrian Ma, 18. left the school in November to join a pro team. "The opportunity was too good to pass up," says Ma. A second school, the University of Pikeville in Kentucky, will offer e-sports scholarships this fall. For gamers, March Madness has indeed arrived.

Read the full story, The Varsity Sport of the Virtual World, in the latest issue of TIME magazine and on TIME.com.

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Correction: The original version of this story misstated the name of the student in slide 9. His name is Zixing Jie.

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