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Obama Says Sony 'Made a Mistake' Pulling The Interview

Updated: Dec 19, 2014 4:21 PM ET

President Barack Obama said Friday that Sony "made a mistake" in pulling its film The Interview from distribution following a cyberattack that American officials have linked to North Korea.

Speaking to reporters at the White House, Obama confirmed the FBI's assessment that North Korea was behind the attack. He said he wished the studio had reached out to him before canceling the film's release, and that he fears it sets a bad precedent for the nation.

"We cannot have a society where some dictator someplace can start imposing censorship here in the United States," Obama said. "Imagine if producers and distributors and others start engaging in self-censorship because they don’t want to offend the sensibilities of someone who’s sensibilities probably need to be offended."

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The Interview, 2014 The James Franco-Seth Rogen movie hadn’t even been released when it made its greatest impact. The Interview, about two Americans on a mission to kill Kim Jong-un, has sparked conversations about the tastefulness -- or not -- of depicting the killing of a foreign head of state. But it also is widely seen as having sparked the Sony hacking scandal, as the hackers, known as the Guardians of Peace, have urged Sony not to release the film. The ripple effect of the email hack saw off-color remarks about Angelina Jolie, Aaron Sorkin, and President Obama between Sony executives go public.Columbia
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"That’s not who we are," Obama added, noting that the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing did not deter runners from running this year. "That’s not what America’s about."

Sony Pictures Entertainment CEO Michael Lynton, appearing on CNN shortly after Obama spoke, defended the studio. "We have not caved," he said. "We have not given up. We have persevered and we have not backed down. We have always had every desire to have the American public see this movie."

Obama promised that the United States would respond "proportionally" to the attack, but would not detail those actions publicly.

"We will respond," he said. We will respond proportionally, and we will respond at a place and time that we choose."

Read more: The 7 most outrageous things we learned from the Sony hack

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