TIME animals

Rare Deep-Sea Angler Fish Caught on Film

Meet the Black Seadevil

Scientists caught a rare glimpse of a elusive anglerfish in the ocean depths during a recent exploration.

The 9-centimeter long Black Seadevil, or Melanocetus, was caught on video in November by researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute in California, USA Today reports.

Bruce Robison, a senior scientist at the institute, believes the footage is the first time a living fish was filmed at its depth of 600 meters. Researchers were exploring the Monterey Canyon, a part of the Pacific Ocean that’s as large as the Grand Canyon.

“These are ambush predators,” Robison said of the fish, which has sharp teeth on the outside of its large jaw and uses a flashlight-like body part to attract prey.

[USA Today]

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