TIME

Ukraine Prepares Crimea Troop Withdrawal

A Ukrainian serviceman packs his things in the Ukrainian navy headquarters after it was stormed by Crimean pro-Russian self-defense forces in Sevastopol, Crimea
Andrew Lubimov—AP A Ukrainian serviceman packs his things in the Ukrainian navy headquarters after it was stormed by Crimean pro-Russian self-defense forces in Sevastopol, Crimea, March 19, 2014.

The country's defense secretary says Ukraine is drawing up plans to withdraw servicemen and their families from Crimea, as at least two military bases there fall to pro-Russia forces

The Ukrainian government is making preparations to remove its troops from the disputed Crimean peninsula Wednesday, as Russia solidifies its grasp of the region.

“We are developing a plan that would enable us not only to withdraw servicemen, but also members of their families in Crimea, so that they could be quickly and efficiently moved to mainland Ukraine,” Ukrainian defense secretary Andriy Parubiy said in a televised address Wednesday, reports Agence France Presse. Parubiy said Kiev will seek UN support for turning Crimea into a de-militarized zone as it moves its troops out of the area.

The move comes as tensions mount with pro-Russian forces taking control of at least two Ukrainian military outposts in Crimea. Crimean forces stormed a Ukrainian naval base in the port of Sevastopol on Wednesday, and Russian forces later taking over a second base in Novoozerne. On Tuesday, Ukraine’s interim prime minister blamed Russia for the killing of one Ukrainian soldier.

Ukraine’s acting president Oleksandr Turchynov Wednesday demanded pro-Russian Crimean separatist leaders release the head of the country’s Navy, and “all other hostages,” lest Ukrainian authorities be forced to “carry out an adequate response…of a technical and technological nature.” Ukraine’s security chief also said the country was planning military exercises with the United States and the United Kingdom.

Later in the week Russia’s parliament is set to cast a final vote on whether or not to ratify the annexation of Crimea by Russia, a proposal all but certain to pass handily.

[AFP]

Tap to read full story

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com


YOU BROKE TIME.COM!

Dear TIME Readers,

As a regular visitor to TIME.com, we are sure you enjoy all the great journalism created by our editors and reporters. Great journalism has great value, and it costs money to make it. One of the main ways we cover our costs is through advertising.

The use of software that blocks ads limits our ability to provide you with the journalism you enjoy. Consider turning your Ad Blocker off so that we can continue to provide the world class journalism you have become accustomed to.

The TIME Team