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The Top 7 Management Tips From Harvard Business Review

Harvard Business Review recently released a book of their top Management Tips. Here are the ones I felt were the most insightful and actionable.

Get Through Your To-Do List

Via Management Tips From Harvard Business Review:

Self-discipline is hard. Try these three tips to make your work more efficient every day:

  1. Get three things done before noon. Statistics show that the team ahead at halftime is more likely to win the game. Enjoy your lunch knowing that you accomplished at least three tasks in the morning.

  2. Sequence for speed. Break projects into parts. Take on the longer pieces at the beginning and make sure each subsequent part is shorter. If you leave the longest parts for last, you are more likely to run out of steam before the end of the day.

  3. Tackle similar tasks at the same time. The mind thrives on repetition. You can build momentum by taking on similar projects at the same time.

More on productivity here.

 

Pretend You Have What You Want

Via Management Tips From Harvard Business Review:

Your mind is often your greatest tool, but as anyone who has been taken over by fear, frustration, or worry knows, it can also be your greatest enemy. Whether you’re concerned that you don’t have the respect of your peers or that a customer isn’t calling you back because she’s gone to a competitor, overthinking the issue only serves to compound the worry. Instead, pretend you have what you want. Act as if your peers respect you or as if the customer is loyal. These may be fantasies, but what you’re worrying about may be as well. It’s better to stop the worry and act confidently; chances are better that you’ll get what you want.

More on looking and acting like a leader here.

 

Prioritize Value Over Volume

Via Management Tips From Harvard Business Review:

Research has shown that multitasking results in mediocre outcomes. By putting too little attention on too many things, you fail to do anything well. However, the answer isn’t single-tasking either. Single-tasking is far too slow to help you succeed in today’s fast-paced world. Instead, identify the tasks that will create the most value and focus on those. By prioritizing value over volume and sharpening your focus on tasks that truly matter, you’ll increase the quality of your work and, ultimately, the value you provide. What to do with all those tasks that didn’t make the high-value list? Put them on a “do later” list. If they continually fail to make it to the high-value list, ask yourself: why do them at all?

More on time management here.

 

Schedule Regular Meetings With Yourself

Via Management Tips From Harvard Business Review:

As we continue venturing into uncharted economic waters, how can you keep your job on track and deliver your best? Schedule a weekly meeting with yourself. That’s right: no matter how busy you are, this is not a luxury. It’s essential.

Every week, take a quiet hour to reflect on recent critical events—conflicts, failures, opportunities you exploited, observations of others’ behavior, feedback from others. Consider how you responded, what went well, what didn’t, and what might be more effective in the future.Never cancel this meeting—it’s crucial.

More on what it takes to move up the ladder here.

 

Shed Your Excessive “Need To Be You”

Via Management Tips From Harvard Business Review:

One of the worst habits a leader can have is excusing his behavior with claims like, “That’s just the way I am!” Stop clinging to bad behaviors because you believe they are essential to who you are. Instead of insisting that you can’t change, think about how these behaviors may be impeding the success of those around you. Don’t think of these behaviors as character traits, but as possibilities for improvement. You’ll be surprised how easily you can change when it helps you succeed.

More on the best business attitude here.

 

Fire Yourself

Via Management Tips From Harvard Business Review:

Management shake-ups, though disruptive, can be good for a company. They bring in fresh perspectives and require that leaders take a hard look at their own performance. Do not wait for your company to get in trouble. Instead, fire yourself. Think about what you would do in your position if you were to start anew. What would you do differently if this were your first day on the job? Taking this step back can help you evaluate the strategies and approaches you are currently using, see things that are too difficult to see when you are entrenched, and reenergize yourself for the challenges ahead.

More on leadership perspective here.

 

Be A Both/And Leader

Via Management Tips From Harvard Business Review:

In today’s tough economy, should leaders be dogged, analytic, and organized or should they be empathic, charismatic, and communicative? The answer is simple: they need all those traits. Rather than categorizing yourself as a certain type of leader, explore the nuances that a complex, fast-moving business environment requires. Leaders need to confidently deliver tough messages with analytics as evidence, but they also need to be sensitive to how people receive those messages. Most leadership traits are not an either/or choice, but rather complementary sides of effective management.

More on what the most successful business leaders have in common here.

Recently I also posted the best life lessons from Harvard Business School’s class of 1963.

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This piece originally appeared on Barking Up the Wrong Tree.

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