TIME Crime

Upskirting Voyeur Didn’t Violate Peeping Tom Law

Man avoids prosecution because his victims were all clothed.

The Boston man arrested in 2010 for using a cell phone camera to take pictures and video up women’s skirts on the subway did not violate Massachusett’s Peeping Tom Law, the state Supreme Court ruled Wednesday.

The court found that, though a woman has a “reasonable expectation of privacy in not having a stranger take photographs up her skirt” the current law does not apply because, technically speaking, a woman in a skirt is fully clothed.

The law “does not apply to photographing…persons who are fully clothed and, in particular, does not reach the type of upskirting that the defendant is charged with attempting to accomplish on the MBTA,” the ruling said.

The district attorney’s office called on the Massachusetts legislature to move fast in updating the Peeping Tom Law to protect women in skirts.

[Reuters]

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