MONEY charitable giving

The Best Ways to Donate to Help Fight Ebola

How to find a charity that will spend your money well—and how to avoid the scams that always spring up after disasters.

Many charities are immersed in the fight to control the Ebola epidemic, but so far the donors have not come forward en masse—although scams already are emerging.

For those ready to dig into their pockets, here are four tips to make an impact with your gift.

Sort the Lists

You can find comprehensive lists of charities fighting Ebola from organizations that vet nonprofits like Guidestar, Charity Navigator, and the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance.

These lists can be overwhelming. Charity Navigator, for instance, identifies 45 charities with top accountability ratings aiding in the fight against Ebola and also helping victims.

Doctors Without Borders, which has been extremely visible throughout the outbreak that has claimed nearly 5,000 lives, tops most lists.

The organization, also known as Medecins Sans Frontieres, announced it is budgeting $64 million for its work fighting Ebola. It has raised at least $35 million in private donations and secured $25 million in institutional funding. The group operates six Ebola case management centers, with about 600 beds that are in isolation. It has treated 3,200 confirmed Ebola cases.

Also among those recommended by Charity Navigator are Pennsylvania-based Brother’s Brother Foundation (which distributes medical supplies), the Missouri-based humanitarian organization Convoy of Hope, and some better-known charities including the United States Fund for UNICEF, Oxfam America, and Save the Children.

Give Broadly

While donors want to know their donation is going for a specific purpose, such as helping victims in a specific country, Ken Berger, chief executive officer of Charity Navigator, says that’s not always the ideal way to go.

It’s best to give to an organization whose overall mission you trust and allow the group to decide where the money can be used, Berger says. Saying you only want the cash to go for a certain medication, for instance, could hamstring an organization that already has an abundant supply of the drug but needs cash for other purposes.

Some noteworthy organizations include the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which has pledged $50 million, committing the first $12 million to the World Health Organization, the U.S. Fund for UNICEF, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Another option is the CDC Foundation, which was created by Congress as a non-profit that raises money in support of the CDC. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife donated $25 million to the foundation.

Donate Your Vacation Time

If you don’t have cash to spare, you can now give away your unused vacation time. The Internal Revenue Service this week added to the mix of donation options specifically related to the Ebola outbreak by allowing American workers to donate vacation, sick time, or personal leave.

Under the IRS guidelines, employees give vacation hours back to their employer who converts those hours into cash. Donating the funds to tax-exempt organizations working to help Ebola victims in Guinea, Liberia, or Sierra Leone qualifies for a tax break. And the employees don’t have the money counted as income, under this arrangement, which has been used for previous natural disasters.

Beware of Scammers

The biggest trouble spots for potential donors are crowdfunding sites along with social media because they can appear legitimate but lack verification.

“Anybody can put up a crowdfunding site and promise to do something,” Wise Giving Alliance chief operating officer Bennett Weiner says.

Hundreds of such sites already exist, such as one that purported to benefit a Dallas nurse who had been infected. It was removed after her family members objected.

Tips from the Federal Trade Commission to avoid Ebola-related fund-raising scams include:

  • Avoid charities that appear to have “sprung up overnight in connection with current events.”
  • Be wary of charities whose websites or names are similar to those of established charities.
  • If you receive a call from a solicitor, and you’re interested, ask who they work for and the percentage of the donation that goes to both the fund-raising firm and the charity. Lack of a clear, direct answer is a red flag.
  • Do not send cash. You won’t know the money went where it was supposed to and you won’t have a record.

 

MONEY Banking

Why the Right Bank for You Might Not Be a Bank

Postage stamp printed in USA, dedicated to the 50th Anniversary of Credit Union Act.
Sergey Komarov-Kohl—Alamy

The best place to park your cash might be a credit union—a nonprofit financial cooperative that serves a select population.

MONEY recently released the results of its 2014 Best Banks survey, which awarded 11 banks honors for low fees, high interest rates and other customer-friendly policies. But it’s possible the best place for you to park your cash might not be on that list.

Rather than a bank, you may be better off with credit union—a nonprofit financial cooperative that serves a select population, like workers at a specific company or residents of a certain county.

Credit unions tend to offer better terms than banks. According to WalletHub, they pay an average 0.23% on $10,000 in savings—twice the average of banks in our study—and 73% offer free checking.

Also, credit unions are known for having more personal customer service, owing to the fact that they are owned by members and are often small (some have just one branch).

Because of their size and membership requirements, credit unions weren’t included in MONEY’s survey, but you can use these steps to find yourself a winner:

Look under rocks.

“We’re pretty sure everybody in the country is eligible to join at least one credit union—and probably several,” says Bill Hampel of the Credit Union National Association.

Start at asmarterchoice.org and nerdwallet.com/credit-union. Also check with your town, employer, alma mater, and religious institution. And ask family which ones they belong to.

Do a smell test.

Compare the yields to the averages at MONEY’s best midsize banks—at least 0.15% on checking and 0.56% on savings. (Online banks pay more but don’t offer the comparable personal attention.)

Also find out if the union has fee-free accounts, and if not, check the minimum-balance requirements to make sure you’d avoid a maintenance fee.

Get out the ruler.

Small credit unions often have just one branch. But about half belong to the CO-OP network, which offers you -access to more than 5,000 shared branches and almost 30,000 ATMs.

To avoid costly fees when you get cash, see if your best option has its own or partner ATMs near your home and work. If you’ll use teller service, make sure the branch is easily accessible.

Of course, CUNA reports that 88% of credit union members are offered mobile apps and 55% allow check deposits via smartphone—so you might not need a teller after all.

See MONEY’s 2014 list of the Best Banks in America

Try out MONEY’s Bank Matchmaker tool to find the best bank for you

MONEY

The Father of Economics Was Also the World’s First Self-Help Guru — And Can Improve Your Life!

Adam Smith (1723-1790), Scottish moral philosopher and a pioneer of political economy.
Adam Smith (1723-1790), Scottish moral philosopher, pioneer of political economy, self-help guru. World History Archive—Alamy

Adam Smith, the 18th century Scotsman best known for writing The Wealth of Nations, is widely misunderstood. His insights into technology, ambition, and friendship that are as relevant today as they were in 1759.

In his new book, How Adam Smith Can Change Your Life, economics popularizer Russell Roberts explores what may be the world’s first self-help book, which is all the more remarkable for its author: Adam Smith, a.k.a., the18th century Scotsman known as the father of economics. But Roberts—host of the popular podcast EconTalk—focuses on Smith’s mostly forgotten book The Theory of Moral Sentiments, illuminating Smith’s insights into technology, ambition and friendship that are as relevant today as they were in 1759. Here are five surprising takeaways from his research.

Adam Smith is widely misunderstood. “I feel bad for Smith. In 1776, he published The Wealth of Nations, which makes him famous forever. That’s the good news. The bad news is that everybody forgets about his other book, The Theory of Moral Sentiments, which came out in 1759. Worse, people come to believe that Adam Smith thinks that greed is good—a caricature of his real views. In The Theory of Moral Sentiments, Smith argues that the pursuit of wealth and fame and power is a fool’s game, corroding your serenity and leaving you very unhappy. Very surprising. What I think he is saying is that getting rich is all well and good. Just don’t make it your goal. He was a very wise man. One of the things I’m doing with my book is setting the record straight.”

Adam Smith was a Buddhist in the making. “If you really want to be a better person—instead of hoping to be one—it helps to pay attention. Smith’s ideas on the ‘impartial spectator’—imagining someone over your shoulder observing your actions who doesn’t have a stake in the matter—is a really helpful way of paying attention. Though we struggle in the moment to recognize our failures, reflection on our conduct after the fact, with the impartial spectator in mind, helps us to face our true selves.”

Adam Smith understood consumers—in the 21stcentury. “There are surprising parallels between what Smith focuses on from his everyday reality and our own. Take technology. Smith inveighs against “trinkets of frivolous utility” that people stuff in their pockets just because they’re really beautifully designed to do what they do, not because they actually make their lives better. Consider the Apple Watch. When Apple CEO Tim Cook introduced the device, the first point he made was its accuracy; it will be synchronized to with the universal time standard and accurate to within 50 milliseconds. Well, that’s a relief! In the 18th century, Smith noticed that people would pay a premium for a more accurate watch but that it had little impact on their punctuality. They just liked the idea of an accurate watch. The more things change, the more they stay the same.”

Adam Smith was the first behavioral economist. “Traditional economics usually assumes that people are rational. Behavioral economics sees human beings as prone to various cognitive biases that limit our ability to think clearly. We are prone to self-deception and our choices suffer from imperfect or distorted information. Smith was very aware of the temptations and comforts of self-deception. He writes of the ‘mysterious veil of self-delusion’ and of our unwillingness to face up to our faults and imperfections. He saw this fatal weakness as being responsible for half the disorders of human life. I wonder if he underestimated the proportion.”

Adam Smith just wanted you to be happy. “People assume, reasonably, that economics is about money—about the stock market, GDP, interest rates, taxes, and so on. Certainly economics has something to say about those things. But what economics is really about is choice–the fact that in the real world, we can’t have everything want, we can’t do everything we’d like. So we have to choose. How should we spend our money, yes. But also how should we spend our time. The choices Smith was most interested in were those involving ethical decisions or how much time and energy to devote to friends and family. All these decisions involve tradeoffs, the essence of economics. Ultimately, according to Smith, what we really care about isn’t money or material things. They can seduce us but their satisfactions don’t endure. What we really care about, says Smith, is the mark we make on those around us—our friends, family, colleagues and then perhaps the wider world. What we really care about isn’t how rich we are but about how rich are lives are in the fullest sense of the word. And that, I think—and I like to think Smith would agree—is what economics is really about: How to get the most out of life.”

MONEY college savings

One Foolproof Way to Earn More on Your College Savings

handing money over
Investing in your state's 529 college savings plan can mean free money. PM Images—Getty Images

Tax breaks, matching grants, and scholarships can effectively boost your investment by an average of 6%.

Savers in many states don’t have to rely solely on the markets to build up a college fund. Grants or tax benefits can effectively boost the value of your investment in a 529 college savings plan by 10%, 20% or even 30%, according to a newly released analysis by Morningstar.

In the 32 states (plus the District of Columbia) that offer subsidies to college savers who contribute to their home state’s 529 plan, the average benefit is a one-time boost worth about 6%.

In New Jersey, parents who seed a NJ BEST 529 account with $1,200 when their kid is about six and kick in at least $300 a year after that will qualify the student for a one-time $1,500 freshman scholarship to an in-state public university. That’s a return of 31.5% on a total investment of $4,800.

Most states simply give parents a tax credit or deduction for a 529 contribution, which translate into a lower state tax bill and thus more money in your checking account. That’s money you can use for anything—including adding to your 529 or offseting the cost of saving for any college.

Residents of Indiana, for example, qualify for a state tax credit worth up to 20% of what they invest in the state’s 529 plan, which can reduce a typical family’s state tax bill by $480. Vermonters get tax breaks typically worth 10% of their investments in their local 529 plan.

Five states offer tax breaks for an investment in any 529, allowing residents to shop for the best plan anywhere. Two of those five states reward both choices: Maine offers a 1.7% tax benefit for any 529 investment, but also provides matching grants for saving in the state’s 529. Pennsylvania’s has tax breaks worth about 3% for any college savings, but it also offers scholarships to hundreds of mostly private colleges across the country for those who invest in-state.

Fifteen states either have no income tax or don’t offer any subsidy to college savers. Check out this 50-state map to see whether to invest in your state, or out of state.

Beware of the Gotchas

The author of the Morningstar report, Kathryn Spica, says you should watch for two big potholes when trying to maximize these freebies.

1. High fees: Some states charge such high fees in their 529 plans that any parent with a child younger than, say, 13 should probably forgo the tax benefit and choose a low-cost, highly-rated direct-sold plan. But for parents of teens close to college, the immediate tax benefits can outweigh only a few years of higher fees.

For example, D.C. offers tax breaks that amount to a one-time 8.5% effective boost to your college savings. But D.C.’s plan charges a high annual fee of 1.35% of assets. Utah’s plan, which gets the highest rating by Morningstar, charges only 0.2%. Within eight years, D.C.’s higher fees would likely eat up your tax benefit.

2. Changing rules: North Carolina cancelled its tax break for 529 savings last year. And Rhode Island has stopped enrolling new parents in its savings match program, Spica says. Parents in states that end or slash tax benefits should take a few minutes to run the numbers and see which investment option best meets their needs.

The Value of the Tax Breaks

The chart below lists the states that offer benefits for investing in the home state 529 as of fall 2014. Morningstar’s estimated value of the subsidy is based on a family earning $50,000 a year and saving $2,400 a year for college. The fees are those charged for an age-based fund for a 7- to 12-year-old that employs a moderate (as opposed to conservative or aggressive) investment strategy.

The final column is Money’s recommendation on whether parents of kids younger than 13 should stick with their state’s best 529 option, or risk giving up the state’s benefit and shop for the best plan nationally.

If your state is not listed here, you won’t be giving up anything if you simply pick the best plan available. Here are Money’s recommendations for the best 529s nationally, based on a combination of the fund’s fees, the state’s tax benefits, and the ratings given the plans by Morningstar and Savingforcollege.com.

State Est. value of state tax benefit on savings of $2,400 a year Effective yield on $2,400 investment Average fee for moderate equity plan for 7- to 12-year-old Should parents of kids under the age of 13 invest in-state or shop?
Indiana $480 20% 0.57% In-state
Vermont $240 10% 0.45% In-state
Oregon $216 9.0% 0.38% In-state
District of Columbia $204 8.5% 1.35% Shop
Idaho $178 7.4% 0.75% In-state
Arkansas $168 7.0% 0.60% In-state
South Carolina $168 7.0% 0.12% In-state
Montana $166 6.9% 0.88% Shop
Iowa $156 6.5% 0.26% In-state
New York $155 6.5% 0.17% In-state
Wisconsin $150 6.3% 0.23% In-state
Georgia $144 6.0% 0.33% In-state
West Virginia $144 6.0% 0.32% In-state
Maine $140 5.8% 0.30% In-state
Virginia $138 5.8% 0.61% In-state
Oklahoma $126 5.3% 0.51% In-state
Alabama $120 5.0% 0.32% In-state
Connecticut $120 5.0% 0.40% In-state
Illinois $120 5.0% 0.19% In-state
Mississippi $120 5.0% 0.65% Shop
Nebraska $120 5.0% 0.48% In-state
Utah $120 5.0% 0.22% In-state
New Mexico $118 4.9% 0.36% In-state
Maryland $114 4.8% 0.88% In-state
Colorado $111 4.6% 0.39% In-state
Michigan $102 4.3% 0.28% In-state
Louisiana $96 4.0% NA In-state
Ohio $90 3.8% 0.23% In-state
North Dakota $68 2.8% 0.85% Shop
Rhode Island $38 1.6% 0.20% In-state
Pennsylvania Variable N.A. 0.38% In-state
New Jersey Up to $1,500 N.A. 0.77% In-state can pay if student definitely will attend a participating college
MONEY Out of the Red

Have You Conquered Debt? Tell Us Your Story

140618_money_gen_13
iStock

With patience, you can pay off large amounts of debt and improve your credit. MONEY wants to hear how you're doing it.

Have you gotten rid of a big IOU on your balance sheet, or at least made significant progress toward that end? MONEY wants to hear your digging-out-of-debt stories, to share with and inspire our readers who might be in similar situations.

Use the confidential form below to tell us about it. What kind of debt did you have, and how much? How did you erase it—or what are you currently doing? What advice do you have for other people in your situation? We’re interested in stories about all kinds of debt, from student loans to credit cards to car loans to mortgages.

Read the first story in our series, about a Marine and mother of three who paid off more than $158,169 in debt:

My kids have been understanding. Now I teach them about needs and wants. The other day, I was coming home from work, and I said, “Do you need anything from the store?” My son said, “We don’t need anything, but we’d like some candy.” If they want a video game, they know they need to save their money to get that video game—and that means there’s something else they won’t be able to get. They understand if you have a big house, that means you have to pay big electricity and water bills. I’m teaching them to live within their means and not just get, get, get to try to impress people.

Do you have a story about conquering debt? Share it with us. Please also let us know where you’re from, what you do for a living, and how old you are. We won’t use your story unless we speak with you first.

MONEY Out of the Red

How I Paid Off $158,169 in Debt

G. McDowell Photography

Think there's no way to get out from under your obligations? This first in a series of profiles of people getting "Out of the Red" proves that it's possible.

Rachel Gause just wanted to give her three kids more than she had growing up. So, though she was receiving a secure income along with child support, she found herself living beyond her means every month—eventually racking up six figures in debt. With a whole lot of determination and almost a decade’s worth of belt-tightening, she’s climbed most of the way out. This is her story, as told to MONEY reporter Kara Brandeisky.

Rachel Gause
Jacksonville, N.C.
Occupation: Master Sergeant, United States Marine Corps
Initial debt: $179,625
Amount left: $21,456
When she started paying it down: 2006
When she hopes to be debt-free: November 2015

How I got into trouble

“I was just trying to keep up with everybody else. I’m a single parent to three kids, ages 10, 14, and 16. I was always spending extra on Christmas and on birthdays. Also, growing up, I didn’t have new clothes and new shoes at the start of every school year. But I wanted to make sure my kids always did.

Looking back, I wish I would have known not to rely on credit cards. I wish I would have known that it’s okay to keep your car for four or more years, as long as you maintain it.

I started going into debt when my first daughter was born, 16 years ago. I remember I had to get a furniture loan. By 2006, I had $55,848 in credit card debt and $76,711 in car loans. Then there were the personal loans. I had a consolidation loan that I used to pay off my credit cards. Altogether, it came out to $179,625.”

My “uh-oh” moment

“I wasn’t aware of how much debt I was in. The turning point for me was when I hit the 10-year point in the Marines, and I saw other people around me retiring. I wanted to sit down and see where I was at. And that’s when I realized I didn’t want to retire in debt. I didn’t want to be that person.

At the time, I had a Toyota Sequoia, and I couldn’t make payments on it. I knew I was in way over my head.

Even though I had three kids, we didn’t need that big truck. It was going to put my family at a financial challenge. So I spoke to a lady at my church, and I said, ‘I have this truck, and I’m going to trade it in for something smaller.’ And she said, ‘I always wanted a Toyota Sequoia.’ I sold it to her and got into a Corolla instead.

I realized buying that truck was a bad choice, and I knew I needed to develop better habits from there. That was my first step forward.

How I’m getting out from under

Now I put roughly $2,100 a month toward my debt.

For the rest of my income, I use the envelope system. Before I get paid, I do my budget. Then I have 13 envelopes—one for groceries, one for clothes and shoes, one for charity, one for dining out, one for gas, and so on. I go to the bank, take the money out, and divide it between the envelopes.

I don’t spend anything that doesn’t come out of those envelopes. Debit cards are nice, but swiping is less emotional. Cash makes me more aware of what I’m spending my money on. If I run out of money for something that month, I don’t buy it. But I’ve never run out of money for something important—now I’m more aware of how much I’m spending.

That’s because I also got a small composition book from Dollar General to track my spending. Every time I spend money, I write it in that book. Then I compare that to what I’m supposed to be spending, according to my budget.

I also do a quarterly audit on myself to make sure I’m not spending too much more on my cable or cell phone bills.

But it’s not all deprivation. We have a chart that we color in every time we reach a milestone, and we treat ourselves to something nice. For example, recently I went on a trip with my high school classmates to Atlanta—funded totally in cash.

My kids have been understanding about our debt-free journey. They know that mommy has made some bad financial decisions in the past. Now I teach them about needs and wants.

The other day, I was coming home from work, and I said, “Do you need anything from the store?” My son said, “We don’t need anything, but we’d like some candy.”

If they want a video game, they know they need to save their money to get that video game—and that means there’s something else they won’t be able to get. They understand if you have a big house, that means you have to pay big electricity and water bills. I’m teaching them to live within their means and not just get, get, get to try to impress people.

What I’ve learned that could help someone else

My advice would be to sit down, see where you’re at—first, you have to know how much debt you’re in—and then create a spending plan. (Some people are scared of the word “budget.”) You have to tell your money where to go, or it’s going to tell you where to go.

The numbers may scare you in the beginning. It takes two or three months before you can get the budget right.

And you have to be consistent. If you don’t put 100% into it, it’s not going to work. You can’t be half, ‘I’m trying to get out of debt,’ and half, ‘I still want to spend money.’ You have to sacrifice.

My hopes for the future

Once I become debt-free, I plan to build up my emergency fund and then start actively investing and saving for retirement.

Then I hope to get my kids off to a better start.

My daughter will go to college soon. We’ve talked about student loans.

The main reason I joined the military was to obtain my college degree for free. I earned my degree in business administration from the University of North Carolina-Wilmington last year. But while I was there, I saw so many kids taking courses for a second and third time because they were failing and they weren’t going to class.

So I told my daughter, you’ll pay for that first year, and we’ll see how you manage. Then I’ll assist you with your second, third and fourth years. But first, I need to make sure you’re dedicated.

After I retire from the military, I want to become a certified financial counselor so I can help people break the vicious cycle of being in debt and dying in debt. My passion is to put together financial classes for non-profit organizations like women’s shelters, churches, and organizations for military service members. There aren’t that many in this area, and I see a real need. I see so many people struggling to survive, living paycheck to paycheck.

I’ve already started counseling some people who ask for help.

Every now and then, I get a message on Facebook from someone I helped that says, ‘I just paid off another credit card’ or ‘I paid off my car.’ That’s my motivation now. I don’t want to stop – the need is out there.

Are you climbing out of debt? Share your story of getting Out of the Red.

Check out Money 101 for more resources:

MONEY Taxes

How to Never Miss Out On One Valuable Tax Break

Odometer
James F. Dean—Getty Images

Workers who drive a lot for business can write off the costs. These three tools can make tracking those miles on the road easier.

More than 40 million Americans earn money while driving around in their cars, making them eligible for a valuable business mileage deduction from the Internal Revenue Service.

At 56¢ a mile, less than two business miles equals a dollar. So for someone driving 25,000 business miles a year, $14,000 in deductions is at stake.

Keeping an accurate mileage log used to be an arduous task involving a notepad and paper, but most people do not bother with the work. Many recreate their trips after the fact. Some just make it up. Do it wrong and you could get an audit.

“Getting a lot of round numbers means people either aren’t tracking or are rounding,” says P.J. Wallin, 33, a certified public account from Richmond, Virginia.

Bill Nemeth, an enrolled agent who represents clients in IRS audits, says most of his clients tend to exaggerate their business mileage and, when audited, it can be challenge to try to prove they actually drove the miles. Nemeth says he even uses Carfax reports from cars that clients have sold in order to document the actual mileage of the vehicles. In more than 25 years of doing taxes, Nemeth can recall only one client who presented a log that was clearly used daily.

MileIQ, which sells a GPS device that helps track mileage, surveyed about 1,000 of its users and found that only 36% of them had kept a written log previously. Another 18% admitted to making up numbers after the fact, 15% said they did nothing with their mileage, and 11% said they used their calendars to go back and recreate driving distances.

But in today’s highly automated world, apps and standalone GPS devices take the work out of the process, so there are no more excuses. Prices and functions vary, and some personal preference is involved.

Here are three different approaches – all of which are tax-deductible as a work expense.

MileIQ

This iPhone app (scheduled to be out soon for Androids) promises to be more automated than its cousins—always running in the background. It costs $5.99 a month or $59.99 a year. Lighter drivers, however, can use it for free. Users can log 40 drives a month before they would have to take a paid subscription, so you can take it for a test drive.

The idea is that the app does most of the work, although eventually users have to look over the results and eliminate listings that were not for business. Data from the app is regularly uploaded to the cloud, and reports sent automatically via email. Users can also customize the data.

MileIQ co-founder Charles Dietrich says the app actually learns from patterns and increasingly knows when a trip is of the reimbursable sort and when it is not.

Easy Mile Log

This device, which costs $149, is a small GPS tracking device you leave in your car. When you start a drive, press a button to note the trip is either work or personal. It will document the date and time of your travels, where you started, where you went and the distance. You can dump the data from the device onto your computer using a USB cord.

EasyBiz Mileage Tracker

At $2.99, EasyBiz Mileage Tracker is a cheaper app option, but not quite as automated as the others. Instead, it relies on the user to create what is basically a computer-assisted mileage log – starting and stopping each trip, while it notes the location and the distance via GPS.

Mileage Tracker allows users to customize report printing and add other entries – like tolls, for instance – that could come in handy when doing mileage reports.

MONEY

You Can Be the Next ‘Girl With a Pearl Earring’ for $10,000

Book with cover with woman with mask and question mark over face
MONEY (photo illustration)—iStock (book); Joseph Desire Court/DEA/A. DAGLI ORTI/Getty Images (cover)

Writers are selling character names—but no, it's not for personal gain.

Tracy Chevalier, author of the 1999 novel-cum-Scarlett-Johansson-flick Girl With a Pearl Earring, is one of seventeen authors auctioning off character names for upcoming novels—not to pay for giant-mansion-hiding hedges—but to fund therapy for survivors of torture living in the U.K.

Other authors participating include Margaret Atwood, Ken Follett, Julian Barnes, Pat Barker, Ian McEwan, Robert Harris, Will Self, and Zadie Smith.

The November 20 auction is for books in the works (so no, you can’t actually be Johan Vermeer’s fictional servant this time) and you can start bidding today.

Chevalier says she auctioned off the name of a minor character in a book for £800 (about $1,300) last year but would require a bigger donation—to the tune of $10,000— for a main character.

No matter how generous the donation, however, it’s important your name isn’t already famous for other reasons. “It’s not going to work if you’re Bill Gates,” Chevalier says.

This isn’t the first time authors have used a similar stunt for charity: Stephen King, John Grisham, Dave Eggers, and Game of Thrones author George RR Martin have all done the same for causes including a wolf sanctuary and food charity.

The Kardashians did not respond to requests for comment on how much it would cost to star in the next edition of gaming app Kim Kardashian: Hollywood.

MONEY homeowners insurance

Why You Soon May Have to Pick Up More Home Repair Costs

measuring tape with money
Bart Sadowski—Getty Images

Insurers are moving from flat deductibles to higher ones based on the value of your home. Here's what you need to know about this change.

Two years after Superstorm Sandy, State Farm agent Jen Dunn is busy explaining new insurance math to her customers in upstate New York. Instead of the dollar-amount deductibles they have been used to for years, she is now writing their policies based on percentages.

For many, it means turning the typical $500 deductible into 1% of the insured value—for a $250,000 house, that means a gasp-producing $2,500.

“My clients who have been offered this initially say, ‘I don’t like this,'” Dunn says. But then she explains that the higher amount is usually offset by a lower annual premium. If they go years without a claim, they can save in the meantime.

Jason Corbett, 39, who lives in central Georgia, is using a 1% deductible. Because Corbett’s rural home is valued at slightly less than $200,000, it was a better deal than a flat $1,000 deductible. The difference between the two deductibles was only a couple of hundred dollars. However, he saved money by lowering his premium, so over time the difference in his out-of-pocket costs will be negligible.

If he had a $300,000 home and the deductible was double what he pays now, “that would be a different decision,” says Corbett, who writes a personal finance blog.

State Farm, the largest U.S. property and casualty insurance company by market share, says a “significant” number of its policies now have percentage deductibles. Other carriers, like Allstate Corp, USAA, and Nationwide, also offer the option to consumers in certain states, but the prevalence is not yet tracked nationwide. The practice is near-universal in Texas at this point, according to that state’s insurance office.

With a percentage deductible policy, things are a little different than the old-fashioned flat rate. Here are seven things you need to know:

1. Do not be afraid of high deductibles

You might be used to $500, but a higher deductible could actually be better for you.

“It’s a very smart move to buy high deductibles if you can afford it,” advises J. Robert Hunter, director of insurance for the Consumer Federation of America.

The main reason? Every claim you make against your homeowners insurance can raise your rates. One claim pushes it up an average of 9% and two claims will raise it by 20%, according to a recent study by insuranceQuotes.com. So you want to pay out of pocket for small claims anyway.

2. The 1% deductible is not a percentage of your loss

The new terminology makes people think of health insurance, but homeowner claims do not work that way, says Jim Gavin, director of insurance information services for the Independent Insurance Agents of Texas trade group.

Rather, the out-of-pocket deductible you have to pay before the company will cover any claims is based on a percentage of the insured value of your home—which is not the market value or the appraised value, but the cost of replacing your home should it burn to the ground and need to be rebuilt.

For example: If a kitchen fire damaged your $250,000 home with a 1% deductible, and it cost $5,000 to repair the damage, you would receive a check from the insurance company for $2,500 after paying the other half yourself.

3. Your out-of-pocket costs will regularly increase

Your $500 deductible stays flat forever, but a percentage deductible will go up incrementally over time as the insured value of your home rises.

Some homeowners may not even notice this, like Will Harvey, 34, of Tyler, Texas, who is five years into a 1% policy on his home. “If it went up, it wasn’t enough for me to remember it,” he says.

4. You will still have other deductibles on top of the basic rate

Many homeowners have add-on clauses like a 5% hurricane deductible that is common in coastal areas, or 2% for wind and hail damage. Many states require separate coverage for earthquakes and floods.

Those all still apply on top of the basic coverage for fire and theft, says Amy Danise, editorial director of Insure.com. So if you have any damage that is caused by a specified risk, you will have to pay out of pocket first for that.

5. Your might be able to pay down your percentile

If 1% is too much for you, you may have the option to accept a higher premium to lower out-of-pocket costs—going from 1% to half a percent or some other fraction. The value to you depends on how much your house is worth and how much you can afford to pay out of your savings if something goes wrong, says State Farm’s Dunn.

6. You can still shop around

Even in Texas, where almost every company offers a deductible of at least 1%, or sometimes up to 1.5% or 2%, some carriers still do things the traditional way. Texas insurance agent Criss Sudduth says the customers who might benefit more from a flat-fee policy are those whose premiums do not actually go down despite the percentage policy—either because the weather risks are too high or because their personal credit is bad.

7. You should still figure out your dollar amount

After years of hearing complaints from consumers who are confused, the Texas legislature passed a bill recently requiring carriers to explain what the percentage deductible translates into, in dollars.

In other states, if your carrier does not do this, you should find out the information yourself and write it on your declarations page, says Deeia Beck, public counsel and executive director of the Texas Office of Public Insurance Counsel.

MONEY First-Time Dad

How to Cook a Real Dinner for Your Family…and Finish Before 9 p.m.

Luke Tepper

First-time dad Taylor Tepper asks parents and cooking experts for advice on feeding a family while maintaining your sanity. What he learns: Focus on formats.

Last week, I stood in the first aisle of my local grocery store for a few minutes blinking at a bin of scallions.

I had a cart in one hand, a shopping list in the other, and a podcast playing in my ear. I needed to grab a bunch of groceries, get home and make dinner.

But at some point in the produce section, I fell victim to a momentary lapse of cognitive function, as if I was a computer that had overheated. For a moment, I wished I had simply ordered in Chinese.

A parent’s day is long. Ours starts at 5:30 a.m. with a groggy baby and two sleep-deprived parents, and I don’t return home with dinner’s ingredients in tow until 7 p.m.

To be clear, I genuinely relish the responsibility of providing my family with sustenance. Plus I know there are real benefits to eating real food prepared at home: We can eat more healthfully and save a few bucks in the process.

But my problem is that I’m terrible at planning. I’ll look up a recipe before I head home from work, buy everything on the ingredient list (often forgetting that I have a quarter of the stuff at home), walk home and make the meal. On that day last week when I paused in front of the scallions, for instance, I ended up preparing a baked chicken dish with Kalamata olives, dates, tomatoes with an herb jus and mashed potatoes.

Delicious. Only, my wife and I finished eating close to 9 p.m.—at which point I devolved into a coma.

I know I’m wasting time and money. I need help. I need a plan.

So I turned to a few experts: KJ Dell’Antonia, who as the lead writer at the New York Times Motherlode blog has written on her successes and failures of cooking for a family, my friend Cara Eisenpress whose cookbook and blog BigGirlsSmallKitchen.com document dinner prep in a diminutive Brooklyn apartment, and Phyllis Grant, a former pastry chef whose blog DashandBella.com chronicles meals made with her kids.

The Game Plan

“Obviously I’m a big fan of planning,” says Dell’Antonia. “There’s nothing like realizing that it’s 4 pm and you’ll have to make dinner again tonight—but not only do you know what it is already, but you’ve got all the ingredients and maybe some prep work done. Saves my life every time.”

But what type of plan is best for a busy working parent like me?

Cara told me to forget about specific recipes and think more broadly.

“When planning, think in terms of formats,” she says. “Pasta, hearty soups, stir fries, roasted cut-up chicken, and eggs are all classes of weeknight dinner that are so simple to vary.”

In other words, rather than shopping for a pasta dish on Monday (like Lemon Fettuccine with Bacon and Chives) and then returning to the store on Tuesday in search of ingredients for for another (say Orecchiette Carbonara with Scallions and Sun-dried Tomatoes), plan on whipping up two pasta dishes and a chicken entrée over the next few days and then map out recipes from there. That way you’ll buy overlapping ingredients.

At the same time, though, be mindful of planning too far ahead, says Cara.

“Don’t shop for the seven nights’ worth of formats—you’ll waste food and money if something comes up,” she advised. “Better to plan out fewer and then grab a few miscellaneous staples that could turn into dinner as needed, like extra onions (caramelized onion grilled cheese), a box of spinach (lentil soup with spinach), or some bacon (breakfast for dinner).”

Grant even suggests preparing more than one night’s worth of a neutral protein like chicken, which she notes “can be a life saver, You won’t get sick of it because you can dress it up with some many different flavors and techniques.”

Most importantly, Cara said, make sure you have a stocked pantry—including olive oil, vinegar, mustard, salt, rice, pasta and cheddar, among others—to augment whatever recipes you’ve chosen.

The Defense Formation

After you’ve figured out the formats and recipes you’re interested in for the next couple of days, it’s time to actually buy the food.

But the grocery store is like a casino: The thing is designed to have you spend more time shuffling along the aisles so that you look at more food. They even mess with the music (see #19 here).

If you’re not careful, you’ll arrive home with a beautiful jar of jam that will sit in your fridge for the next six months. (Guilty!)

That’s why Dell’Antonia recommends shopping with a list, “and not buying anything that’s not on it,” says. “Ridiculously, I save money by sending my babysitter to the grocery store when I can. Her time costs me less than I’d spend in ‘Oh, look! Halloween Oreos!'”

Also, look for items that will make your cooking life easier, says Cara. “Don’t shy away from shortcut ingredients. Find brands of tomato sauce, salsa, stock, pre-washed spinach, ravioli, etc. that you like: each of those gets you a third of the way to dinner. There are some vegetables I think of as shortcuts too because they require so little prep: a potato you can rinse and then bake, and my go-to, fennel, where you just remove the outer skin, quarter what’s left, and roast to get a super simple serving of vegetables.”

Kickoff!

Time to practice my new strategy.

I replenished up my pantry—I was a little low on olive oil and pepper—and decided to prepare Chicken with Figs and Grapes from Grant’s blog. I even bought a little extra chicken and stock for some soup later in the week (guess I was in a chicken format mood.)

Her recipe calls for about a dozen different ingredients, but since my pantry is already full, I only need to pick up the chicken, anchovies, figs and grapes.

I’m in and out of my local grocery store in five minutes (without jam!) and before long my kitchen is humming right along.

The dish is relatively easy to prepare and after a little less than 30 minutes in the oven, my wife and I have a meal for tonight and tomorrow. I arrived home by 7:15pm and we finished eating around an hour later, about 45 minutes quicker than normal and nearly a Tepper weekday record.

Our stomachs were full, the kitchen relatively clean and my brain didn’t wither like a raisin during the process.

A sense of peace had been restored in my life.

Adulthood can be difficult—after a long day of work, it often just feels easier to order a delicious Korean BBQ kimchi burrito than expending the time and effort to put together a meal. So sometimes the Teppers do just that.

But as Cara says, “Cooking at home is one of the best parts of being a grown-up. You get to eat exactly what you want when you want it. So, if you like to eat, you like not spending all your money, and you like putting relatively healthful food in your body, you should probably learn to cook.”

And if you’re going to do it, plan ahead.

Taylor Tepper is a reporter at Money. His column on being a new dad, a millennial, and (pretty) broke appears weekly. More First-Time Dad:

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