MONEY Gas

Gas Prices Dropped 30 Out of 31 Days in July

The national average for gas prices experienced the largest drop in July in six years, according to AAA

The direction that gas prices have been heading in during peak vacation and road trip season should put smiles on the face of American motorists.

As of July 31, the AAA Fuel Gauge Report listed the national average for a gallon of regular at $3.517, roughly 3¢ less than a week ago, 16¢ less than one month ago, and 11¢ less than prices at the pump at this time last year. What’s more, AAA announced that gas prices fell in 30 out of 31 days in July, helping to bring about the biggest decline in prices at the pump in July in six years.

This is the first time ever recorded that gas prices have fallen so consistently in July, which is a month when gas prices are generally prone to soar. The highest national average ever posted remains July 2008, when prices spiked to a panic-inducing $4.11.

“Falling gas prices are nearly the opposite to what we usually see this time of year,” said AAA spokesman Avery Ash. So what explains the decline? “Refineries are running at full tilt and there is more than enough gasoline in the market, which has helped bring down prices despite multiple overseas conflicts.”

And what can we expect going forward? Well, gas prices have dropped in August in three of the last five years. But prior performance is no indication of what’ll happen in the future—just look at gas prices recently, which have fallen during a time period when they have skyrocketed in the past.

Even so, the experts at AAA anticipate that gas prices will continue on a downward path in the days and weeks ahead, provided there are no major hurricanes, refinery problems, or unforeseen international conflicts—any of which could send fuel costs up and up. For now at least, the idea that gas prices peaked for 2014 in early spring is still holding up.

TIME mergers

Why Big Mergers Are Bad for Consumers

When big companies merge, it’s good for the bankers—but not so good for the rest of us

Rupert Murdoch’s 21st century Fox wants to take over Time Warner. Comcast wants to buy Time Warner Cable. AT&T and DirecTV may hook up to compete against them. T-Mobile and Sprint are looking to connect, as are any number of other large communications firms, not to mention technology and pharma giants. We are in a new golden age of mergers and acquisitions–M&A activity was up sharply in 2014 and is already at pre-financial-crisis levels. Now bankers are salivating at the billions of dollars in fees such deals generate. The question is, Will the deals be any good for the rest of us?

Since the early 1980s, antitrust regulators like the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission have tried to answer that question by asking another: Will a given merger bring down prices and improve services for consumers? If the answer was even remotely yes, then the merger–no matter how big–was likely to go through. But voices on all sides of the antitrust debate are beginning to question whether that rationale is actually working anymore.

Nobody would argue that the megamergers that have taken place over the past 30 years in pharmaceuticals, for example, have brought down drug prices. Or that the tie-ups between big airlines have made flying more enjoyable. Or that conglomerate banks have made our financial system more robust. “Merging companies always say that they’ll save money and bring down prices,” says Albert Foer, president of the American Antitrust Institute, a think tank devoted to studying competition. “But the reality is that they often end up with monopoly power that allows them to exert incredible pressure in whatever way they like.” That can include squeezing not only customers but also smaller suppliers way down the food chain.

Take the book business, for example. Though publishing is minuscule as a percentage of the economy, it has recently become a focal point in the debate over how our antitrust system works (or doesn’t), mostly because it illustrates the incredible power of one corporation: Amazon. In 2012, the Department of Justice went after tech giant Apple and a group of five major book publishers for collusion, winning a case against them for attempting to fix the prices of e-books. The publishers argued their actions were a response to anticompetitive monopoly pricing by Amazon. Apple is appealing.

Did the verdict serve the public? Many people, including star trial attorney David Boies, say no. Boies, who’s been representing large firms on both sides of the antitrust issue as well as the DOJ over the past several decades, says the verdict is “a failure of common sense and analysis.” Regulators often bring collusion cases, for example, because they are relatively easy to prove. Yet in this case, argues Boies, it led to an outcome in which the entrenched market participant, Amazon, was strengthened, and new participants–Apple and the book publishers–that hoped to create a competing platform in the e-book industry were shot down. “The result is that Amazon gets bigger, and eventually regulators will have to go after them,” says Boies. “We really need a more realistic, commonsense view of antitrust enforcement.” Amazon declined to comment.

The “Bigger Is Better” ethos of the 1980s and 1990s grew not only out of conservative, markets-know-best thinking. It was also fueled by a belief on the left that antitrust enforcement was wasteful and that regulating big companies was preferable to trying to stop them from becoming too big in the first place. Neither side got it right. Big companies aren’t always concerned first about the welfare of their customers–or particularly easy to regulate. The idea of letting companies do whatever they want as long as they can prove that they are decreasing prices may be far too simplistic a logic to serve the public–or even the corporate–good. Amazon shares have tumbled as investors worry about the future of a company that has so successfully compressed prices that it generates as much as $20 billion in revenue a quarter but no profit.

How to fix things? We need a rethink of antitrust logic that takes into consideration a more complex, global landscape in which megamergers have unpredictable ripple effects. We also need a new definition of consumer good that encompasses not only price but choice and the kind of marketplace diversity that encourages innovation and growth. Tech and communications firms today are like the railroads of old: it will take a strong hand to rein them in. That’s a task not for regulators but for Congress and a new Administration. Until then, with corporate coffers full and markets flying high, the big are only likely to get bigger.

MONEY financial advisers

A Young Financial Adviser Is Hard to Find

Only 5% of U.S. brokers are in their 20s, and training programs at large firms aren't getting any bigger.

Wall Street faces a mass exodus of retiring financial advisers over the next decade, so small brokerages are beefing up their training and presence on campuses to woo future employees.

Some 25,000 brokers and brokerage firm advisers will retire over the next three years, a trend that is expected to continue for more than 10 years, according to research firm Cerulli Associates. Within 10 years, roughly one-third of U.S. financial advisers will retire, it estimated.

Not enough young financial advisers are available to take their place. Only 5 percent of the 308,000 brokers and advisers at U.S. firms are younger than 30 years old, according to Cerulli.

“The issue isn’t that the seniors are leaving. It’s that the industry doesn’t have many freshmen or sophomores to replace them,” said Craig Pfeiffer, founder and chief executive of independent training program Advisors Ahead.

Training can be costly: about $250,000 to recruit and train a rookie adviser in a four-year program that only one out of four will complete, Andre Cappon, president of research firm CBM Group, said.

Though traditional brokerage firms like Morgan Stanley and Wells Fargo can recruit more rookie advisers because of their size, these so-called wirehouse firms are not expanding their training programs the way small firms are. Larger firms can be more successful at hiring established advisers and have been fine-tuning their training programs to focus on certain niches.

Morgan Stanley does not plan to increase the 1,000 trainees it annually accepts into its program in the near future, spokeswoman Christine Jockle said. Wells Fargo, which adds 600 to 900 participants per year, is trending toward the lower end of that range to “focus on quality,” Tom Allen, learning and development manager, said.

Smaller firms cannot easily poach experienced financial advisers from bigger firms, so they use training programs to build up their workforce.

“(Our increased training) stems from the need for building and investing in talent in the near future,” said Kimberly Thekan, director of talent acquisition and integration for Robert Baird’s private wealth management business. Baird is accelerating recruitment on college campuses and helping to develop a wealth management and financial planning track at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s business school.

Regional brokerage Edward D. Jones Investments has 400 recent college graduates in its current group of 3,000 trainees. The company, which spends $250,000 on each new adviser over two years, plans on increasing enrollment every year to accommodate growing customer demand for advisory services, said John Rahal, principal and financial adviser for talent acquisition at the firm.

Raymond James Financial will triple the 100 participants annually enrolled in its Advisor Mastery Program over the next three to five years, said Tash Elwyn, president of the firm’s private client group. He said he intends to use the program to replace the company’s retiring financial advisers on a one-to-one basis.

MONEY Shopping

12 Iconic Stores and Restaurants That Are Rapidly Disappearing

RadioShack store in downtown Cincinnati
Al Behrman—AP

A dozen once-ubiquitous retailers and restaurants—places where you probably shopped and dined at as a kid—may soon be shutting their doors.

Moody’s Investors Service said in a report this week that RadioShack is in danger of running out of cash by autumn of 2015, according to Bloomberg News. It’s the latest indication that the struggling chain is doomed, following news in the spring that it planned to close up to 1,100 stores. (Those plans were scaled back to around 200 store closures, but still…) The electronics chain’s difficulties probably shouldn’t come as much of a surprise given the times we live in today. After all, the word “radio” is in the name. Who buys radios anymore?

RadioShack is hardly the only well-known national chain that is flummoxed by the ultra-competitive, rapidly changing modern-day marketplace and shutting locations, among other steps, as a survival tactic. Here are 11 others.

Albertsons
Amid toughening competition in the grocery space—low-cost upstarts, dollar stores, big box all-purpose stores, and online sellers have all stepped up their game—the Albertsons supermarket chain announced earlier this year it would be closing 26 stores, most of them in California. In late July, Albertsons bought Safeway, and the merger is expected to bring about more store closures, most likely ones operating under the Albertsons or Vons brand.

Staples
Quite a lot is riding on the current back-to-school shopping season for Staples. After a subpar fourth quarter last year, it announced it would close as many as 225 stores in 2014, after closing 42 throughout North American in 2013. Declining sales have continued into the first half of 2014, largely due to the widespread consumer “shift to e-retailers, mass merchants and drugstores to buy their office supplies,” as Reuters put it. More closures are inevitable if sales during the all-important back-to-school period aren’t up to snuff—and maybe even if they’re decent, as Staples seems increasingly focused on online sales.

Family Dollar
In April, after yet another report of declining store sales, Family Dollar said it would be shutting 370 locations. Now that rival Dollar Tree is buying Family Dollar, it’s likely that more stores—from one or both of these brands, which often have locations in very close proximity to each other—will disappear.

Quiznos
The toasted sandwich chain peaked sometime in the early ’00s, when it boasted some 5,000 stores around the U.S. Quiznos closed around 2,000 locations during the Great Recession years, not only because household spending budgets shrunk, but also because of increased competition from highly successful Subway and all manner of trendy fast-casual restaurants. The more positive economic climate of recent years hasn’t brought Quiznos back from the brink. The company filed for bankruptcy earlier this year. While Quiznos wants to put this all in the past, a trickling of closures continues, such as one planned to take place in Austin in August.

Aeropostale
24/7 Wall Street put Aeropostale on its list of “10 Brands That Will Disappear in 2015,” and some 125 of its stores are set to disappear by the end of the current fiscal year. The company’s sales and stock price have been cratering due to what’s described as a “seismic shift” in teens’ fashion taste.

Abercrombie & Fitch
Similar to Aeropostale, the much-higher priced Abercrombie & Fitch has cited a “challenging retail environment,” especially among teens, as a prime reason for declining sales—and why it is being forced to close dozens of stores. The overpriced merchandise and the fat-shaming comments of its CEO probably haven’t helped either.

Toys R Us
The continued shift to online shopping, combined with a shift among consumers away from toys and more toward gadgets, has had the toy store giant in a funk for years. To cope with declining sales, there have been thousands of layoffs at the retail and administrative levels, and some expect store closures at any moment. Overall, things look grim. “There is a 50-50 chance the company can survive,” Howard Davidowitz, chairman of the retail consulting firm Davidowitz & Associates, told the The Record in New Jersey, home of Toys R Us’s headquarters. “I’m not saying they are finished. I would not say that. But there is a limited time, given the debt level they have, for this business to get fixed.”

TCBY
Once 1,500 franchises strong, TCBY has closed two-thirds of its locations over the years. TCBY has tried many things to kickstart the business—Greek fro-yo, sharing space with sister brand Mrs. Fields Cookies—but some think that TCBY is likely to suffer the same fate as Crumbs, the trendy cupcake chain that recently shut down.

Barnes & Noble, J.C. Penney, Sears
The decline, and perhaps impending death, of these three iconic, old-timey retailers has been discussed for so long that it’s almost surprising they’re still around. Barnes & Noble has closed 10% of its stores over the last five years, despite the fact that its long-time book-selling rival, Borders, is no longer in the picture, and despite relentless pressure from Amazon.com. J.C. Penney is routinely described as being in a “death spiral” and “at death’s door.” As for Sears, when CEO Edward Lampert was speaking to investors this past spring, he offered a brutally honest vision of what’s to come. “Closing stores is going to be part of our future,” he said.

Read More:
10 Things Americans Have Suddenly Stopped Buying
10 Things Millennials Won’t Spend Money On

MONEY women

VOTE: Who Should Be the First Woman On a Modern Dollar Bill?

140618_money_gen_6
iStock

Eleanor Roosevelt? Harriet Tubman? Beyoncé? Cast your vote in the poll below.

Is it time to put a woman on our paper currency? President Obama went on record today saying it’s a “pretty good idea.” During a speech in Kansas City, Obama said he received a letter from a young girl asking why there aren’t any women on American paper money. (Dollar coins with Susan B. Anthony and Sacagawea are still in circulation, but they are no longer being minted, and Martha Washington appeared on a paper note in the 19th century.)

Well, if Congress is taking suggestions… who do you think should get the honor? Take our poll:

 

Here are nominations from our readers — some silly, and some serious. (Some answers were lightly edited for length and clarity.)

Sojourner Truth

Loretta Lynn

“Loretta Lynn is Appalachian royalty – the last area of the continent that is truly American with its own unique culture that hasn’t been watered down and corrupted by political correctness, big city immorality, and liberalism. Loretta wrote and sang songs from the heart and did a lot to bring women’s rights to areas of the country that otherwise would not have gotten on board. Make this southern, West Virginian white boy proud. Ayn Rand, although a semi-good author, ain’t even American.”
– James

Rosa Parks

“She set the wheels of justice in motion.”
– Jebediah

A close call

Sarah Palin

“One would be hard pressed to find a better representative of a modern American: ignorant, short sighted, narrow-minded, with an unabashed persistent goal of increasing personal wealth.”
– David

Janet Yellen

“The first female Chair at the Fed, quite possibly one of the most powerful people on the planet.”
– Daniel

Susan B. Anthony

“They gave her that stupid dollar coin that never took off! They need to make it up to her! If a woman is willing to get thrown to the ground, arrested, and abused when fighting for women’s rights, she deserves to be on a bill.”
– Michelle

Hattie Caraway

“The first woman elected to the U.S. Senate.”
– Adena

Sandra Day O’Connor

“The first woman on the Supreme Court. She did a lot more for this nation than at least half, if not more, of the people on your list.”
– David

Katharine Hepburn

“She was the greatest actress in U.S. history. She won four Academy Awards, and she always fight for civil rights.”
– Victor

Marie Curie

Lady Gaga

“Lady Gaga is the Queen, and if you don’t put her on the dollar bill, it might as well be blank.”
– Derek

Minnie Mouse

“She has brought more tourism and money into the United States than any other female figure! Much more than any politician!”
– Maria

C.J. Walker

“Her story is the epitome of the American Dream. Born of poor sharecroppers in Louisiana, she became the first self-made millionaire woman – a huge feat for any woman of that time, but for a black woman of that time in the South, it is an amazing story.”
– Michelle

Jane Scott

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

“Jackie helped create what is now the JFK Library, and she helped save Grand Central Terminal. During her time in the White House she completely restored it and did a TV special on all her hard work, for which she won an Emmy. And Jackie raised two amazing children, Caroline, who is now ambassador to Japan, and the late John F. Kennedy Jr.”
– Kaitlyn

Dolly Madison

“She risked her life to save important items from the White House when the British invaded Washington and burned the White House. She was a beloved figure in Washington, D.C.”
– Margaret

It’s a tie

 

Have another nomination? Tweet us at @Money with #WOMENonMONEY to tell us who you support, or tell us in the form below, and we might publish your response:

 

MONEY Debt

9 Ways to Outsmart Debt Collectors

iPhone submerged in water
Henrik Sorensen—Getty Images

More than a third of Americans have debts reported to collection agencies. If you're one of them, here are the repayment and negotiating strategies you need to know.

Today’s encouraging economic news notwithstanding, plenty of Americans are still struggling with their own personal economies. According to a study released Tuesday by the Urban Institute, more than 35% of Americans have debt that has been reported to collection agencies. What’s more, the share of consumers in collections hasn’t changed, even as overall credit-card debt has decreased in recent years.

If you’re one of the many people being dunned for delinquent credit-card, hospital, or other bills, it’s easy to feel intimidated by collection agencies and confused about the repayment process. But rather than panicking and avoiding your collector’s many calls—and there will be many—here are 9 ways to gain the upper hand in negotiations and, most important, keep from paying a penny more than you have to.

1. Don’t Get Emotional

When a debt collector calls, he’s trying to assess your ability to pay and may attempt to get you to say or agree to things you shouldn’t. You’d be best served by keeping the initial call short and businesslike. Collection agencies are required by law to send you a written notice of how much you owe five days after initially contacting you. Wait to engage with them until after you receive this letter.

2. Make Sure the Debt Is Really Yours

If the debt sounds unfamiliar, check your credit reports. Request a report from each of the three credit bureaus for free from annualcreditreport.com and scan for any incorrect data. A study by the Federal Trade Commission found that one in 20 consumers could have errors in their reports, and 24% of the mistakes people reported were about a debt collection that wasn’t actually theirs. (Learn more about how to fix costly credit report errors.)

3. Ask for Proof

Once you get written notice, contact the debt collector. If you are disputing the debt because of an error or identity theft, send a letter to the collector by certified mail within 30 days of receiving your notice stating that you will not pay and why. Also notify each of the three credit bureaus by mail, explaining the error and including documentation so that the problem can be removed from your report. If you are unsure about whether you owe money or how much you owe, ask the collector by certified mail for verification of the debt. That should silence the calls for a while; collectors must suspend activity until they’ve sent you verification of the debt.

4. Resist the Scare Tactics

Some debt collectors may try a range of tricks to get you to pay up, but it’s important to know your rights. Under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, collectors cannot use abusive or obscene language, harass you with repeated calls, call before 8 a.m. or after 9 p.m., call you at work if you’ve asked them to stop, talk to a third party about your debt, claim to be an attorney or law enforcement, threaten to sue unless they intend to take legal action, or threaten to garnish wages or seize property unless they actually intend to. If the agency commits a violation, file a complaint with the FTC and your state Attorney General, and consider talking to an attorney about bringing your own private action against the collector for breaking the law.

5. Be Wary of Fees

Typically, the contract you agreed to when you took out the loan or signed up for the line of credit states how much interest a collector can charge on your debt. Most states have laws in place capping the amount of interest agencies can tack on. Check the balance the original creditor listed as “charged off” on your credit report. If there is a big increase in the amount the collector wants, consult your original contract. Your verification letter may also give you more info about how fees are calculated. If you believe the debt has been inflated, reach out to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which might be able to resolve your issue with the collector.

6. Negotiate

Collection agencies will push you to pay the full debt at once, but if that is not an option for you, tell them how much you can afford to pay and ask if they will settle for that amount. If they accept these terms, get confirmation of the deal in writing before you pay. This way, you avoid any miscommunication about the total to be paid and time frame for the payments.

7. Call In Backup

If you and the debt collector can’t reach an agreement and it appears likely they will take you to court, consider hiring an attorney. While the fees and costs of doing so may be prohibitive, the collection agency is more likely to drop the case in favor of easier targets, a.k.a debtors without attorney representation.

8. Know the Time Limits

Creditors may imply that court action can be taken against if you don’t pay up, and while that’s true, there is only a certain window of time—typically three to six years—in which a creditor can sue you over the debt. While you’ll still owe the money, and collectors may still call about it, creditors cannot take you to court over it once it’s past your state’s statute of limitations. Statutes vary widely by state and type of debt, so check your state’s specific rules if the collector is calling about older debts.

9. Don’t Get Tripped Up By Your Own Good Intentions

Collectors can’t legally “re-age” your debt by giving it a new delinquency date, but you can inadvertently extend the statute of limitations or restart the clock in some states by making a payment on old debt, agreeing to an extended repayment plan, or even acknowledging that the debts is yours.

More Help for Conquering Debt:

3 Simple Steps to Get Out of Debt

7 Ways to Improve Your Credit

Which Debts Should I Pay Off First?

 

 

MONEY online shopping

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MONEY Fast Food

WATCH: McDonald’s Ruling Heats Up Fast-Food Unionization Battle

The National Labor Relations Board's general counsel says McDonald's is partly responsible for any possible labor violations at its franchised restaurants.

MONEY Sports

As Jeter Farewell Tour Wraps Up, Ticket Sellers Cash In

Derek Jeter
In his final season, Derek Jeter of the New York Yankees acknowledges the crowd as he comes up to bat in the first inning during the 2014 MLB All Star Game. Scott Rovak/USA TODAY Sports—Reuters

With Derek Jeter's retirement drawing nearer, the "Jeter effect" is pushing ticket prices skyward—not only at Yankee Stadium, but at ballparks around the country.

When a legendary captain with five World Series championships, more than 3,400 hits, and the respect and admiration of everyone with a vague knowledge of baseball retires, you expect him to get quite a sendoff. Now that the final weeks of Derek Jeter’s professional baseball career are upon us, we’re seeing exactly how much fans value the man and the player—in dollars and cents.

The hoopla over Jeter’s retirement kicked off seconds after he said this would be his final season back in February. The buzz kicked into a higher gear more recently when the New York Yankees announced that an official retirement ceremony honoring the sure-thing Hall of Famer would take place on September 7, causing ticket prices for that day’s game to hit the roof. Data cited by ESPN indicated that the average asking price on the secondary market for the game—a Sunday afternoon matchup against the Kansas City Royals, three weeks before the season ends—shot up from $139 to around $500 within 24 hours of the announcement.

Following the law of supply and demand, sellers soon began asking as much as $9,999 per ticket, with bleacher seats with a face value of $16 selling for more than $200, prompting outrage from some fans sickened by the price gouging, the New York Post reported. “It’s crazy!” said one fan who had hoped to buy tickets for the game for his daughter, who idolizes Jeter. “I knew there would be some increase, but this is robbery.”

Well, the robbery has only grown more egregious. A recent look at the ticket resale site StubHub showed that the high end for asking prices topped $11,000 for the game.

It’s not just the Jeter retirement ceremony game, nor just the remaining games at Yankee Stadium, for which fans are being asked to pony up big bucks to see #2 live in action for perhaps the last time. Data released earlier this season from SeatGeek, a ticket resale and research site, has it that the average price for a Yankees away game is up 25% this year, hitting $101, up from $81 in 2013.

As the season inches closer to its final innings, the “Jeter effect” on pricing seems to be increasing. According to data pulled for us by TiqIQ, secondary market prices for upcoming Yankees road games are around double the usual going rate (if not much higher) at stadiums in places like Tampa, Baltimore, and Boston. For the August 15-17 series against the Yankees hosted by the Tampa Bay Rays, asking prices were averaging $144, versus the Rays’ usual home average price of $69. (Keep in mind, we’re talking average prices here—some Rays home games against other teams are listed for under $10.) For the Baltimore Orioles’ final home series against Jeter and the Yankees (September 12-14), the average ticket price was $125, compared with a season-long home average of $65.

Then there are the Red Sox and Fenway Park. The World Series champs started the season with the highest face value ticket prices in baseball, averaging $52 per seat at home games (about $1 more than the Yankees). Despite a disappointing season, Red Sox home tickets have been selling for an average of $117 on the secondary market. Yet TiqIQ says that the average price per ticket for the Sox season-ending home series against the Yankees on September 26-28 is now up to $332, even though neither team is likely to be fighting for a playoff spot by then.

Data supplied by StubHub is slightly different, but no less impressive. Average asking prices for the final game of the season at Fenway Park on September 28 stood at $150 before Jeter announced his retirement in February. The average shot up almost immediately to $284, and lately, it’s measuring $305. The average is pushed up by some of the astronomically priced tickets, including several pairs of seats offered for around $11,000, and one entire private suite listed at just under $36,000.

Even so, it remains possible for fans to be able to say, “I saw Jeter during his final days as a player,” without getting completely taken to the cleaners. In fact, tickets to some upcoming Yankees games are downright cheap. Tickets to the Royals game at Yankee Stadium on the day before Jeter’s retirement ceremony can be had for about $20, for instance.

At certain Dallas-focused websites, such as that of the Dallas Morning News, banner ads alerted baseball fans that this week would be the “Last Chance to see Jeter in Texas!” The Rangers, currently in last place in the American League West, apparently need all the help they can get to attract fans to the ballpark.

But the Jeter effect can only do so much. Per TiqIQ, the average going price for the Rangers final home series against the Yankees was $72, compared with $50 for the season overall. On Tuesday, asking prices for that night’s game versus the Jeter-led Yankees were as low as $5. Still, for Wednesday’s game—the series’ ender, so truly the last chance to see Derek Jeter play in Texas—the average asking price was a more respectable, Jeter-worthy $90.

Related:

What You Can Learn from Derek Jeter’s Perfect Exit

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