MONEY early retirement

5 Ways to Know If You’re on Track to Retire Early

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More than any numerical calculation, your financial behaviors are a reliable indicator for early retirement.

Interested in retiring early? How do you know if you’re on track? The usual answer is a financial formula: A given amount of savings, plus some investment return, equals a certain lifestyle, for a certain number of years. It’s simple math. Or is it?

In fact, it’s extremely difficult to predict your financial trajectory far into the future. Numbers can be deceiving. How about a different approach? These five career and financial behaviors may be the best indicator for whether you’re on track to retire early.

Do you love your work?
It might seem ironic to begin a discussion of early retirement with whether or not you like your job. After all, isn’t the point of retirement to stop working? Yet, in my experience, the only way to create the value needed to acquire the assets to retire early is to be great at what you do. And it’s hard to be great at something if you don’t love it. How else will you be motivated to put in the hours required for learning, practice, and mastery? Even in retirement, you may not want to stop being productive. But you’ll have the opportunity to do it in your own way, on your own schedule.

Do you value your time more than things?
Another prerequisite for early financial independence is valuing your free time more than owning things. Many modern professionals could retire in their 50’s if they saved more of their income rather than spending it. But temptations abound, and the instant gratification of another purchase is easier to taste than freedom a decade hence.

Ask yourself whether the things in your life are worth the years of labor you trade for them. Expensive houses, cars, and vacations are big-ticket items that can drain away earnings. Taking on debt to pay for them compounds the problem. We all need some luxuries. But requiring the best in everything is a financial burden. Valuing your time more than things will keep you from that trap.

Are you saving at least 30% of your salary?
There are few absolutes in the early retirement equation. High earnings are nice. A frugal lifestyle is helpful. But, when you really dig into the math, what matters most is your savings rate—the amount of your earnings, as a percent, that you save instead of consuming. That single number captures all the relevant factors for financial independence: how much you make, spend, and invest. It’s the single most important numerical factor in whether you can retire early, and it’s independent of your salary.

If you save at the often-recommended rate of only 10%, it will be about 40 years before you can retire. But accelerating that process is possible. It all depends on your resources and motivation. I saved approximately one-third of my salary, plus bonuses, during the peak earning years. That allowed me to retire at age 50 If you’re able to save 50% of your earnings, you could retire in less than 15 years!

How do you achieve those high savings rates? Increase your earnings by self-improvement. Cultivate a healthy, low-cost lifestyle with free fun and a few carefully chosen luxuries. Max out retirement savings and get company matches.

Do you track your financial “vitals”?
Every early retiree that I know got there in part because they quantify and track things. Rocket science is not required: If you can make a list of numbers and add them, you have most of the math skills needed for early retirement. Here are three vital financial signs to watch:

  • Monthly expenses reflect your lifestyle back to you: Are your daily spending decisions taking you towards financial freedom, or further away?
  • Quarterly net worth tracks your progress to financial independence: Are you growing your assets, or digging yourself into debt?
  • Annual portfolio return measures your investing skill: Are you matching the broad market return? (That’s good enough for early retirement.) If not, try a low-cost, passive indexing approach.

Do you have a potentially profitable passion?
Here’s a secret about early retirement: Like much of life, it’s risky. If you need a perfectly predictable, secure existence, then keep your job. But most early retirees aren’t leaving their career to lie on the beach or play golf full time. Most of them are setting off to pursue other passions. And many of those pursuits have income potential. Whether it’s blogging, guiding, or volunteering at a nonprofit, anybody with extensive experience, who is serving others, will generate value. Oftentimes that winds up paying, which reduces the risk of early retirement.

More than any calculation, your financial behaviors are a reliable indicator for early retirement. I’ve just reviewed five important ones. With these behaviors in place, relax and enjoy the ride. Find happiness every day in meaningful work and prudent living. That will lead to financial freedom, on a schedule that is right for you.

Darrow Kirkpatrick is a software engineer and author who lived frugally, invested successfully, and retired in 2011 at age 50. He writes regularly about saving, investing and retiring on his blog

For more help calculating your needs in retirement:
The One Retirement Question You Must Get Right
How to Figure Out Your Real Cost of Living in Retirement
4 Secrets of Financial Freedom

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