Cyberstock—Alamy
By Jacob Davidson
March 4, 2015

It can be tough out there for the over-30 crowd. Not that I would know— I plan to be in my mid-20s forever. But judging by my older friends, the influx of “just turned 30 (frowny face)” Facebook statuses, and the popular media, the big three-oh is a sobering moment when one comes to terms with the end of youth, the inevitability of death, and the realization that one should maybe stop going out on Mondays.

And that’s not all. Crossing 30 also makes life more expensive. Here are five things that get pricier as millennials enter—or simply get closer to—their next decade:

Tinder
Yes, even hooking up gets more expensive after your 30th birthday. The popular dating app Tinder recently announced that older users will have to pay more for its premium service, Tinder Plus. The service, which removes ads and includes a variety of extra features, will cost Americans $9.99 a month—unless they’re over 29, in which case the price doubles, to $19.99.

Tinder says it isn’t gouging older users, it’s simply offering younger users a discount because they’re “more budget constrained,” but that’s a distinction without difference for everyone stuck paying higher fees.

Health insurance
Thanks to Obamacare, anyone under 26 can comfortably freeload remain on their parents’ insurance. But turn 27 and your health care situation could deteriorate before your eyes. No more mooching off Mom and Dad means you’ll be left with whatever health insurance your work offers, which can be more expensive per person than a family plan, especially if your parents work in an industry with generous benefits. (And that’s assuming you’re currently reimbursing your parents for insurance. Those who don’t will be in for an even harsher wakeup call.) Plus, if you’re unemployed, be prepared to buy individual insurance through health care exchanges, which can be more expensive still.

Gym membership
Having to work out is bad enough, but gym rats over 30 may also end up paying more for the privilege. Local YMCA branches typically offer “young adult” discounts. The age cap on this deal can be as low as 22 or as high as 29, but we’ve yet to see one that extends to people older than their 20s. An adult membership will generally run you about $100 more per year, and that’s not including the emotional cost of being called a no-longer-young “adult.”

Traveling in Europe
Going backpacking through Europe is one of the most stereotypical young-person things out there, so it sort of makes sense it would get more expensive as you get older. Accordingly, Eurail, one of the most popular and cost-effective ways to explore the European continent, is 35% cheaper for travelers under 26. Air travel also gets more expensive for grownup vacationers. STA Travel, which bills itself as a full-service travel retailer, offers special discounts on flights to customers under 26.

Theater tickets
Young fans of the stage are in luck: a huge number of theaters offer special 30-and-under discounts to this coveted demographic. This is especially true in New York City, but since theaters everywhere are struggling to attract a younger crowd, it’s likely you’ll see similar deals across the country. Some locations extend special offers to patrons as “old” as 35, but the farther you get into your 30s, the more you should expect to pay for your arts fix.

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