By Jackie Zimmermann
March 12, 2015

Moving is the worst. Yard work is the worst. Building IKEA furniture is the worst.

You have probably said one or more of these sentences at some point or another. And therein lies the business model for TaskRabbit, a web platform launched in 2008 that specializes in connecting people who need chores done with people willing to complete them.

Consumers in markets where TaskRabbit operates—19 U.S. metro areas and London—simply have to enter information about the task at hand, pick a date and time slot to have it done, and select from a short list of people who are oddly willing to schlep your stuff, rake your yard, or build your unpronounceable shelving unit.

Most of us hate running our own errands, let alone other people’s. So what’s in it for the 30,000-odd people who’ve signed up to be Taskers? A flexible workday is one perk of the job, according to Jamie Viggiano, vice president of marketing for the company. She notes that 60% of Taskers come to the platform wanting to be in control of their own schedules

Oh and then there’s the money, which isn’t half bad. Taskers set their own rates and those who fully commit to the platform, roughly 10% to 15% of them, can earn $6,000 to $7,000 a month, according to Viggiano.

We spoke to three of the company’s “elite taskers” to see just what it takes to earn those big bucks, the perks and pitfalls of the job, and the goofiest tasks to which they’ve subjected themselves.

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