MONEY Housing Market

Why Median Home Prices Are Rising: It’s More Than Just the Values

Home prices keep rising, but not just because they're worth more. Sales of higher-end homes are skewing that median home price figure upward.

The median home price rose 5.1% to $213,400 from a year ago, the National Association of Realtors announced yesterday.

RealtyTrac’s numbers out today, which include foreclosures sales not covered by the NAR report, have median prices up 13% year-over-year.

So does that mean your home value rose 13%?

Of course not, and not just because those figures cover the entire United States. Clearly home values vary widely based on the characteristics of your local market – employment growth, the pace of new construction, incomes, type of home, all sorts of things.

The median home price is shaped by other factors having nothing to do with any particular home or market but, rather, the specific mix of homes sold in that month.

One of the trends we’ve been seeing for a while now is that more higher-priced homes are selling than lower-priced homes. That’s for two reasons:

First, the volume of bargain-priced foreclosures continues to shrink. RealtyTrac’s report says foreclosures and short sales accounted for 14.3% of home sales in May, down from 15.9% a year ago. Consider that the median price of distressed homes was $120,000 versus $190,000 for non-distressed and you can see how simply having fewer troubled properties in the mix would be a powerful pricing boost.

Second, move-up buyers, the ones buying the $500,000-plus homes, are in better financial shape. They have the credit scores to qualify for a mortgage. They also have, more than likely, equity in their current home they can use for a new down payment as well as investments.

See what’s happening at RealtyTrac’s chart of home sales by price tier:

Price Range Share of Sales YoY Change
$50k-$100k 13% -22%
$100k-$200k 33% -5%
$200k-$300k 20% 6%
$300k-$400k 12% 11%
$400k-$500k 7% 17%
$500k-$750k 7% 15%
$750k-$1M 2% 23%
$1M-$2M 2% 24%

Other highlights from RealtyTrac’s report:

Metropolitan areas with sales declines from a year ago include Boston (-23%), Fresno (-22%), Orlando (-18%), Los Angeles (-16%) and Phoenix (-13%).

Areas with the highest share of foreclosures and short sales were Las Vegas (27%), Lakeland, Fla. (33%), Modesto, Calif. (32%), Jacksonville, Fla. (32%) and the Riverside region of southern California (29%).

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