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By Andrea Delbanco
Editor in Chief, TIME for Kids

This week, TIME published “A Parent’s Guide to COVID-19 Vaccines for Kids." It comes as young children have—finally!—been granted access to vaccines. My colleagues with little ones at home are expressing emotions about this milestone moment that I’d imagine are common throughout the country: joy and relief, as well as frustration and apprehension, to name four. In many places, it appears the rollout has been problematic. Even after offering vaccines to the vast majority of the population, we somehow still haven’t smoothed things out to serve the small segment that remains.

My kids aren’t in this age group, so I’ve only watched this drama unfold from afar and seen my social-media feeds light up with it. But I’m wrangling booster shots and mandatory PCR tests for summer sleepaway camp and wondering: Will COVID ever really be behind us?

I hope you found meaningful ways to honor Juneteenth and Father’s Day, and your week is going well. What’s on your mind? Write to me at andrea@time.com.

Best,
Andrea

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