TIME Gadgets

How to Install the iOS 8 Update Without Deleting a Bunch of Photos From Your iPhone

Use iTunes instead of downloading it right on your phone

Apple’s new iOS 8 was released Wednesday, and it’s a pretty great update with lots of new features that’ll make iPhone users happy. One bummer, though, is that if you try to install it directly on your iPhone, you’ll need to clear nearly 6GB of space for the 1.4GB update—which seems nuts!

But fear not, iPhone owners, there’s no need to delete your myriad selfies or songs to make room for the new update. As a workaround, get the iOS 8 update by plugging your iPhone into your desktop computer and running the update via iTunes (full step-by-step here). That way, the update process uses your computer’s much larger storage space rather than your phone’s much smaller storage space.

One quick tip: Make sure you’ve got the newest version of iTunes installed on your computer so it can see the iOS 8 update. And to get the most out of Apple’s new iOS 8, be sure to start by reading TIME’s guide to its new features.

Happy iOS 8ing!

TIME cybersecurity

Chinese Hackers Infiltrated U.S. Defense Contractors, Senate Report Says

Army Lt. Col. Cecil Durbin (left) and Air Force Lt. Col Tom
Army Lt. Col. Cecil Durbin (left) and Air Force Lt. Col Tom Borowiec, a reservist, man the NorthCom Operations Desk inside the Deployment and Distribution Operations Center on Thursday May 1, 2008 at USTRANSCOM, located at Scott AFB in Illinois. Belleville News-Democrat—MCT/Getty Images

Hackers staged at least 20 attacks on private firms involved in the movement of U.S. troops and equipment

Chinese hackers infiltrated U.S. defense contractors on 20 separate occasions and were only twice noticed by authorities, according to the findings of a year-long Senate investigation released on Wednesday.

The Senate probe revealed that hackers targeted private airlines, technology companies and firms that have been contracted by the U.S. Defense Department to transport troops and defense equipment.

“These peacetime intrusions into the networks of key defense contractors are more evidence of China’s aggressive actions in cyberspace,” said Sen. Carl Levin in a public statement accompanying the report. “Our findings are a warning that we must do much more to protect strategically significant systems from attack and to share information about intrusions when they do occur.”

Read the Senate panel’s full report here.

 

TIME Gadgets

Apple’s All-Gold Watch Could Run You a Pretty Penny

Apple's latest mini-device may go for a hefty price.

Apple has kept a tight hold on lots of information regarding its newest product, the Apple Watch, which is set to be released to the public in early 2015 — including most price points. All we know for sure is that the Apple Watch starts at $350, but how expensive it gets is still anybody’s guess.

John Gruber, a longtime Apple watcher, estimates that the Apple Watch Edition, the highest quality of the three watch versions Apple is releasing, will start at $4,999. His predictions are based off of comparable watches made by Rolex, which go for as much as $35,000.

Apple’s low- and high-end models, the Apple Watch Sport and the Apple Watch, respectively, will go for considerably less.

TIME Research

This Could Be the Most Secure Password Ever

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Gen Nishino—Getty Images

Scientists are using your heart as a security authenticator

In the wake of serious security breaches in the last year, from the pilfering of Target customers’ credit card information to the celebrity iCloud selfie-hack, it’s easy to feel digitally naked. Your current best options—like making your password something along the lines of “**_^XBE47>>” or using two-step verification—also have their shortcomings, which has inspired a crop of enterprising scientists to come up with what must be the oddest, and possibly most secure, password yet: the rhythm of your heart.

A team of Toronto scientists has developed a wristband that can use your own heart rhythm, as measured by electrocardiograms (ECG), as an authenticator for everything from accessing email to unlocking cell phones and other gadgets. In a recent talk at the TEDMED conference in Washington and San Francisco, biometric security engineer Foteini Agrafioti told audiences that because our hearts are so unique—from their size to their orientation in the chest to how they pump our blood—they may be the perfect security “password.” The ECG-authenticating wristband, Nymi, is available for preorder on the company’s website for $79.

“We want to make authentication easy and for it to melt into the background,” says Karl Martin, CEO and founder of Nymi’s parent company Bionym. That’s what sets it apart from, say, Apple’s Touch ID fingerprint authenticator, which requires a person to prove themselves with every transaction, instead of being constantly read.

The company is now working on partnerships with password platforms, payment systems and travel companies with the hopes that this kind of ECG reading might soon be seamlessly adopted.

Biometrics are still not perfect, but the possibilities are vast. In her TEDMED speech, Agrafioti said she believes the future of security lies in the parts of our bodies that are difficult to steal and biologically exclusive. Think lip prints, tongue prints, nose pores, and even the acoustic emissions our ears make. “Don’t be surprised if we have managed to embed tiny microphones into earphones so your music player only unlocks in your own ears,” said Agrafioti.

“You look at the way we prove our identities and it’s archaic. Technology has advanced so much and still if we want to prove who we are, it’s usually with a password or a pin,” says Martin. “A lot of what we are focusing on for the future is not even directly security-related. It’s about hyper-personalization. How can you have a different experience if devices or smart things around you knew who you were and knew your preferences? In smart environments, like a smart home, you shouldn’t have to put in your password on a wall—it should just know it’s you.”

Agrafioti said we need to be willing to think outside the box to keep our information safe: “Passwords are broken because hackers are sophisticated but also because we as humans are just not up to taking ridiculous precautions to maintain our security.”

If their predictions are correct, one day it won’t be “ridiculous” to use your heart rhythms as a password—it will be ridiculous not to.

TIME Companies

Uber to Military Veterans: We Want You

German Court Bans Uber Service Nationwide
In this photo illustration, a woman uses the Uber app on an Samsung smartphone on September 2, 2014 in Berlin, Germany. Adam Berry—Getty Images

The on-demand car service announced a new program aimed at providing economic opportunities to those who serve in the military

Uber announced a new program Wednesday that aims to get 50,000 military service members, veterans and spouses to enlist as drivers for the on-demand car service. Over the next 18 months, UberMILITARY will enlist drivers from the military community in an effort to “empower them as entrepreneurs and small business owners,” according to an Uber blog post.

Uber says its drivers’ flexible schedules could be of benefit to veterans working transition back into civilian life. The company also says the program could help members of the service community and their families combat the unique challenges they face, including high levels of unemployment and frequent relocation. Military spouses move an average of eight times over a 20-year career, while veterans under 25 face an unemployment rate of 21.4% (the national unemployment rate is 6.1%).

To achieve its goal, Uber is enlisting the help of former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, who will serve as the chairman of UberMILITARY’s advisory board. In a joint op-ed published by Politico Magazine Wednesday, Gates and Uber CEO Travis Kalanick said that “UberMILITARY is a reflection that high-quality service, an unparalleled commitment to safety and the leadership potential inherent to small business entrepreneurship are values shared by those who have selflessly served our country.”

TIME How-To

Choosing the Best Insurance for Your Phone

broken phone
Getty Images

Phone insurance and extended protection plans aren’t cheap, but the investment can save you big down the line should your phone get lost, stolen or damaged.

Take the iPhone 6. While you may be able to get it for $0 down, a replacement will cost you $650 out of pocket and even a small drop can leave you with a cracked display that can cost hundreds to fix.

Fortunately, protection plan options are plentiful, but picking the right one can be complicated. Extended warranty plans only cover repairs when there’s a mechanical failure, not loss, theft or accidental damage. Other plans will cover accidental and mechanical failures but not loss or theft. And, different types of coverage come at varying price points.

So which is the right plan for you? If you, or your child, is forgetful or accident prone, a full coverage plan may be best. Or, you may have enough coverage from your credit card company or home owner’s insurance. Check out the following plans to see what’s right for you.

Retailers

Many large electronics retailers offer phone insurance. Best Buy, for example, will insure an iPhone 5S or 6 for two years for the lump sum of $199.98 or for $9.99 a month. That covers malfunctions as well as accidental damage to the phone, but not loss or theft. There’s a $149.99 deductible for claims that are not covered under the manufacturer’s warranty and you have to buy the Geek Squad protection with the product online or within 15 days of buying your phone in-store. There’s a limit of three claim submissions.

SquareTrade

For two years of coverage for mechanical and electrical failures as well as accidental damage—but not loss or theft—SquareTrade offers a warranty for the iPhone 5S or 6 for $99 for two years or $5 per month. That’s a better deal compared with Best Buy, even though they nail you with a $75 deductible for every smartphone claim.

You can buy a SquareTrade warranty on a retail item within 30 days of buying it or if the phone is currently insured by AT&T, Verizon, Sprint or T-Mobile. For one you bought on eBay, coverage starts after the existing manufacturer’s warranty expires or on the 46th day after purchase, if there is no warranty.

Worth Ave. Group

An insurance policy from Worth Ave. Group covers a cell phone for accidental damage such as drops and spills as well as theft, fire, flood, natural disasters and lightning strikes. For an iPhone 5S (16GB model with $649 coverage), you’ll spend $130 for two years with a $50 deductible (iPhone 6 pricing isn’t available yet). For smartphones other than iPhones, a phone costing $649 will run $138 for two years with a $50 deductible. Loss and malfunction are not covered. You can buy insurance from Worth Ave. Group anytime, even on older devices.

Carriers

For $7 per month, AT&T offers coverage for loss, theft and out-of-warranty malfunction of your phone. When making a claim, you’ll need to pay a $50-$199 deductible (iPhones have a $199 deductible). You can make two claims per year for a total of $1,500.

For $8-$11 per month, Sprint offers full coverage–loss, theft, accidental damage and mechanical or electrical breakdown. You’ll also pay a deductible of $50-$200 (see the full list of fees and deductibles) for each claim. You can make two claims per year for a total of $1,500. New York residents can also purchase just insurance (loss, theft and accidental damage) for $5-$9 per month (iPhones would be $9 per month).

T-Mobile offers a few options for those looking for coverage. For $8 per month, you can get full coverage–loss, theft, accidental damage and mechanical or electrical breakdown–or you can choose to pay for an extended warranty for $5 per month or just insurance for $6 per month. A non-refundable deductible of $20 to $175 (iPhones have a $175 deductible), depending on your device, is applied for each claim. You can make two claims each year with a limit of $1,500 for each loss.

Verizon tacks $10 for the iPhone and $8 for other smartphones to cover loss, theft, accidental damage and electrical or mechanical failure after the manufacturer’s warranty expires. There’s a deductible of $99 for non-iPhone models and $99-$199, depending on which model iPhone you have. You can make two claims per year for a total of $1,500.

Major Credit Cards

There are two ways that credit cards can provide coverage for your phone. First, many major credit cards extended the manufacturer’s warranty by a year or longer, though it varies depending on the card. Check out Credit.com’s tutorial on the subject. Many also cover loss from theft or damage within the first 90 days after purchase.

You can also get theft and damage coverage from select cards if you use them pay for your cell phone service, including Wells Fargo and First Citizens Bank. MagnifyMoney.com has a list of more than 25 banks and credit unions offering the feature.

Homeowners/Renters Insurance

For larger purchases, such as premium smartphones, some insurance companies will let you attach a rider to your homeowners or renters insurance, which will specifically cover that purchase. Smartphones are usually covered in general by homeowners and renters insurance under the same conditions of your general insurance policy. You’ll want to check with your provider to find out your options. You’ll also want to find out how filing claims for your smartphone, if you don’t have a rider, may impact the fees you pay for your overall homeowners or renters insurance and whether repeat claims could lead your insurance company to drop your coverage.

Pricing by Provider for an iPhone 5S

Best Buy Carriers Worth Ave. Group SquareTrade Major Credit Cards Homeowners Insurance AppleCare
Loss (first 90 days) Varies
Theft (first 90 days) Varies
Damage Varies
Mechanical / Electrical Defect
When you can purchase Within 15 days of purchase Varies Anytime Within 30 days of purchase or if the phone is currently insured by AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile or Verizon Automatic at time of purchase Within 60 days of purchase
Deductible $150 $200 $50 $75 $0 Varies $79
Cost for 2 years
$200 (lump sum) or $240 (paid monthly) $168-$264 $130 $99 (lump sum) or ($120 paid monthly) $0 Varies, but starts around $40 $99
Pricing by Carrier for an iPhone 5S

AT&T Sprint T-Mobile Verizon
Deductible $199 $0 (for first 2 claims if it can be repaired in-store), $200 $175 $199.00
Cost for 2 years
$168 (full coverage) $264 (full coverage) $120 (extended warranty only), $144 (insurance only), $192 (full coverage) $240 (full coverage)
Claims & coverage
2 claims per year, total $1,500 2 claims per year, total $1,500 2 claims per year, total $1,500 per claim 2 claims per year, total $1,500

All pricing and plan data as of 9/15/2014

This article was written by Suzanne Kantra and originally appeared on Techlicious.

More from Techlicious:

TIME Smartphones

Here’s What Reviewers Are Saying About the iPhone 6

iPhone 6 Review
The Apple Inc. iPhone 6, left, and iPhone 6 Plus displayed after a product announcement at Flint Center in Cupertino, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. Bloomberg via Getty Images

Conflicted about getting Apple's newest iPhone? Get some advice from those who've held the devices in their own hands

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This post is in partnership with Fortune, which offers the latest business and finance news. Read the article below originally published at Fortune.com.

By Philip Elmer-DeWitt

Joshua Topolsky, Bloomberg: Big vs. Extremely Big. “I don’t know if you’ve heard, but there’s a new iPhone. Two, actually. The iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus. This isn’t just a regular phone release from the cats in Cupertino. With the new devices, Apple enters a market in which it has literally been unable to compete: the market for big, big devices, currently dominated by Korean giant (and Apple nemesis) Samsung Electronicsand its Galaxy S line of Android phones. According to court documents revealed earlier this year, Apple executives lamented the company’s lack of a larger phone in a marketing slideshow. “Consumers want what we don’t have,” read one slide as it showed the growth of the jumbo-phone market… Well, so much for that problem.”

Molly Wood, New York Times: With New iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, It’s What’s Inside That Counts. “After almost a week of trying the phones, it became clear that the hardware was not the best part of the package. In its quest to deliver bigger phones to a market clamoring for them, Apple has made one phone that is actually a little too small and one that’s a little too big.”

David Pogue, Yahoo: iPhone 6 Is a Thin, Sexy Phone with a Killer Camera. “The iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus are absolutely terrific phones. They’re fast and powerful and well designed. There’s not a single component that hasn’t been improved. These phones are a delight to behold and to be held… You will hear — and it’s true — that Apple did not pioneer many of the iPhone 6’s big-ticket features. Other companies’ phones were first to introduce bigger phone screens; “always listening” voice commands; wireless payments; predictive keyboard words; phase-detection autofocusing; time-lapse video; optical image stabilizers; VoLTE calling; and so on. That’s right: Apple has adapted features that first appeared on Android. Just as Google has adapted many features from Apple.”

For the rest of the story, go to Fortune.com.

 

TIME Smartphones

Sony’s Inability to Sell Smartphones Is Costing It Billions

Sony Smartphones Costing it Billions
Kazuo Hirai, president and CEO of Sony Corp., attends a news conference in Tokyo, Japan, on Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014. Bloomberg via Getty Images

The cell-phone business was Sony’s largest sales contributor last year

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This post is in partnership with Fortune, which offers the latest business and finance news. Read the article below originally published at Fortune.com.

By John Kell

The cell-phone business was Sony’s largest sales contributor last year.

All is not well at Japan’s flagship electronics maker.

Sony has projected its current fiscal-year loss will widen to more than $2.1 billion, a bigger loss than previously expected, as the Japanese company trims the value of its mobile communications business.

The company said it will book an impairment charge of about 180 billion yen ($1.7 billion). The company is shifting gears in the mobile segment, now focusing on reporting more stable profits and concentrating on its premium lineup, while reducing the amount of models in its mid-range lineup. Sony had previously admitted sales of its mid-range smartphones, intended for emerging markets, hadn’t been as strong as the company had hoped.

The mobile-phone business was Sony’s largest sales contributor last year, and was also the company’s most profitable electronics division just a year ago, according to The Wall Street Journal.

For the rest of the story, please go to Fortune.com.

TIME Software

iOS 8 Release Guide

Apple

It’s Wednesday, September 17. Happy iOS 8 Day, everyone. Here’s what to expect.

When will iOS 8 be available?

Apple never sets a hard-and-fast time on when it’ll start rolling out the update, but it’s historically started rolling new iOS versions out around 1pm Eastern time. Some years, I’ve gotten the update right away; some years, it’s taken until around 3pm or so. I can’t ever remember getting it before 1pm, though.

How do I get it?

If you do nothing, you’ll eventually get a pop-up message on your phone saying that the new software is available. You can check manually in a couple ways, though.

First, from your phone, open the Settings app, select General and then Software Update. Your phone will check with Apple’s servers to see if the update is ready for you. Again, just because it’s 1pm doesn’t mean you’ll get the update right away. Be patient.

Second, connect your phone to your computer, open iTunes on your computer, and the first heading under your phone’s page in iTunes contains information about which version of iOS it’s running. Click the “Check for Update” button every once in a while to see if the new software is available for you. I actually find this method to work better than trying to get the update directly from my phone. Your mileage may vary, but give it a try if you’re near a computer when the update starts rolling out.

Will it work on my phone?

iOS 8 is compatible with the iPhone 4S and up. It’ll also be available for the iPad 2 and up, all iPad Mini models, and the fifth-generation iPod Touch.

What should I do while I’m waiting?

If you’re going the iTunes route, make sure you have the latest version (click Help, then Check for Updates). And make sure your phone has enough storage space to accommodate the new software. You’ll want to clear out five gigabytes or more if you’re updating straight from your phone, just to be on the safe side. Here’s a guide with information about how you can do that. If you’re updating from iTunes, you won’t need to have nearly as much space free.

You’ll also want the latest version of iOS 7 — version 7.1.2 — in order to quickly upgrade to iOS 8. Use the steps in the “How do I get it?” section above to make sure you’re running the latest version.

What’s new in iOS 8?

There’s a new photo album and quicker, easier photo editing; there are enhanced voice and video messages; there’s a revamped keyboard that predicts which word you’re going to type next; there’s a new health and fitness app; there’s a cloud-based hard drive; there’s app- and book-sharing between family members; there are enhanced notifications and a few other bells and whistles thrown in.

Apple’s iOS 8 site is here; we have an iOS feature guide here.

Do I need to download iOS 8 right away?

No. In fact, it could be argued that it’s a good idea to wait until the first update to iOS 8 hits — usually a couple weeks later — for all the kinks to get worked out. If you don’t install iOS 8 right away, your phone will still work just fine. Sometimes it’s best to wait at least a day or two to see what people are saying about the update online. Are they complaining about shorter battery life? Are apps crashing more often? Does the interface seem sluggish? If so, it might be a good idea to hold off for a while until everything gets smoothed out.

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