TIME Careers & Workplace

There’s No Such Thing as Work-Life Balance

Group of office workers in a boardroom presentation
Chris Ryan—Getty Images/OJO Images RF

A mixture of the two creates value in a way that neither does on its own

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This post is in partnership with Fortune, which offers the latest business and finance news. Read the article below originally published at Fortune.com.

As parents settle into the new school year — a time for new schedules, new activities and new demands — the pressure to balance life and work is ever present. But to suggest there is some way to find a perfect ‘balance’ (i.e., to focus equal time and attention on work and home) is impossible in my mind. Or to put it more bluntly – the whole concept of work-life balance is bull.

I’m still a parent when I walk into work, and I still lead a company when I come home. So if my daughters’ school calls with a question in the middle of a meeting, I’m going to take the call. And if a viral petition breaks out in the middle of dinner, I’ll probably take that call, too.

And that’s okay — at least for me and my family. I have accepted that work and life are layers on top of each other, with rotating levels of emphasis, and I have benefited from celebrating that overlap rather than to try to force it apart.

I refer to this as the “Work/Life Mashup.” In tech-speak, a “mashup” is a webpage or app that is created by combining data and/or functionality from multiple sources. The term became popular in the early days of “Web 2.0,” when API’s (application programming interfaces) started allowing people to easily layer services on top of each other – like photographs of apartment rental listings on top of Google maps. There is a similar concept in music, where a mashup is a piece of music that combines two or more tracks into one.

One of the key concepts of a mashup is that the resulting product provides value in a way that neither originally did on its own; each layer adds value to the other.

Now, I’m not suggesting this is a guilt-free approach to life. People – and especially women – who try to do a lot often feel like they do none of it well, and I certainly suffer from that myself. But I have learned over time that how I feel about this is up to me. How much or how little guilt I experience at work or at home is in my control.

I also realize that the concept of a mashup is a lot easier (and perhaps only possible) for people with jobs where creating flexibility is possible. With these caveats in mind, here are some things to think about to create a work/life mashup early in your career: add value and don’t ask permission.

For the rest of the story, please go to Fortune.com.

TIME Apple

Here’s Why People in China Are Going Crazy Over the iPhone 6

iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus retail sales begin in Spain
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Twice as many as Apple sold the first weekend in 10 countries last month

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This post is in partnership with Fortune, which offers the latest business and finance news. Read the article below originally published at Fortune.com.

A reporter who has been tracking iPhone 6 and 6 Plus reservations in China for the past week estimated on Tencent QQ Monday that more than 20 million units were pre-ordered last weekend. His report is being picked up by DigiTimes and other Asian tech sites.

If the 20-million figure is accurate — a big if — it would mean that five times as many iPhone 6s were pre-ordered in three days in one country as were the first weekend in 10 countries, including the U.S., U.K. and Hong Kong.

Apple reported last month that took more than 4 million pre-orders in one day and sold more than 10 million units the the first weekend.

It’s not easy to get comparable numbers in China, where customers register their orders not just with Apple and the three major Chinese carriers, but also with thousands of authorized Apple resellers.

The Tencent estimate seems to be based largely on the same JingDong reservation counter we’ve been tracking. As of 8:00 p.m. Monday, Beijing time, JingDong‘s total stood at more than 9.5 million, split nearly evenly between the two models:

  • iPhone 6: 4,672,082
  • iPhone 6 Plus: 4,831,091

The long lines of ethnic Chinese buyers camped out in front of Apple retail outlets last month suggested that the large-screen iPhones would be a big hit in China. What we don’t know is exactly how big.

Sales on the mainland are scheduled to begin Friday, Oct. 17. On Apple’s Chinese online store, most models are already sold out.

For the rest of the story, please go to Fortune.com.

TIME Autos

Toyota Recalls 1.7 Million Vehicles Worldwide Over Range of Defects

Toyota Managing Officer Takuo Sasaki Earnings News Conference And Company's Vehicles Displayed At Tokyo Headquarters
The Toyota Motor Corp. logo is displayed on an automobile at the company's headquarters in Tokyo, Japan, on Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. Junko Kimura-Matsumoto—Bloomberg / Getty Images

The Japanese automaker will check for potential faults in the brake system and cracks in the fuel pipe system

Toyota Motor Corporation announced a recall of 1.75 million vehicles worldwide on Oct. 15 to check for a range of defects, including faulty brakes and leaky fuel pipes.

The largest recall covered 802,000 vehicles from the Crown Majesta, Crown, Noah and Voxy models, the BBC reports. The vehicles had the potential to develop cracks in the brake system, causing a leakage of brake fluid.

A second recall of 759,000 Lexus model vehicles would check for potential cracks and leaks in the fuel pipe system, posing a fire hazard to the passengers. A third recall of 190,00 vehicles in the automaker’s home country, Japan, would check for leaks around fuel suction plates.

Toyota said it had no knowledge of injuries related to the defects. The recall comes amid a record-breaking surge of recall notices by automakers in the wake of General Motors’ failure to address a potentially fatal defect in its vehicles. In April, Toyota recalled 6.39 million vehicles over a range of faults.

[BBC]

TIME Technology & Media

HBO Will Finally Start Selling Web-Only Subscriptions Next Year

HBO Chairman and CEO Richard Plepler and HBO Programming President Michael Lombardo speak onstage at the Executive Session panel during the HBO portion of the 2014 Summer Television Critics Association on July 10, 2014 in Beverly Hills.
HBO Chairman and CEO Richard Plepler and HBO Programming President Michael Lombardo speak onstage at the Executive Session panel during the HBO portion of the 2014 Summer Television Critics Association on July 10, 2014 in Beverly Hills. Frederick M. Brown—Getty Images

Viewers won't have to pay for a pricey TV package to watch HBO shows like Game of Thrones and Boardwalk Empire

HBO will begin selling web-only subscriptions in 2015, a major move for the television giant as it seeks to attract a younger generation of consumers more likely to skip paying for cable television in favor of streaming services like Netflix.

HBO CEO Richard Plepler said at a Time Warner investors’ event Wednesday that HBO will launch a “stand alone, over the top” version of its network beginning in 2015 that won’t require a pay TV subscription, Re/code reports. HBO is a subsidiary of Time Warner.

The new offering would likely mean that viewers will be able to watch hit HBO shows like Game of Thrones, The Sopranos, Boardwalk Empire and others without having to pay for a TV service, similar to Netflix’s model for watching shows like Orange is the New Black and House of Cards. However, HBO has so far offered few details about what content will be available on the service. HBO recently put some of its older but well-regarded content, such as The Wire, available to watch on Amazon’s streaming service, Amazon Prime Instant Video.

Time Warner made $4.9 billion in revenue from HBO last year, but it could attract more TV viewers by offering its standalone web service to customers who want to leave cable or don’t already pay for cable.

[Re/code]

TIME Gadgets

Everything You Need to Know About will.i.am’s Smartwatch

Salesforce.com's Dreamforce 2014 Conference
Marc Benioff (left) and will.i.am participate in the keynote speech at Salesforce.com's Dreamforce 2014 Conference. Tim Mosenfelder—Getty Images

First: There is such a thing. Also, it will play music, make calls and log onto Facebook

Apple is launching its much-anticipated smartwatch in early 2015, but rapper/tech evangelist will.i.a.m is hoping to beat the company to the punch. The artist (who was a guest at Apple’s unveiling earlier this year) is planning to debut his own long-discussed smartwatch Wednesday night at a Salesforce.com tech conference in San Francisco, according to blog Engadget. Will.i.am. will be the featured speaker during a session called “Wrist Power: The Vision of Wearable Computing and Fashion Tech.”

The rapper, who also serves as the Director of Creative Innovation for Intel, has been teasing the watch for a while. Back in April, he said that the device won’t have to be tethered to a phone to function, unlike most similar devices on the market. His watch will be able to make calls, play music, use Bluetooth to interact with other devices, and feature social apps like Twitter and Facebook.

There’s no word yet on price or battery life, but it’s likely will.i.am will try to market his watch as a high-end, fashionable device. He debuted a $475 iPhone camera add-on aimed at “influencers” in 2012 and more recently partnered with Lexus on a car equipped with specially designed cameras to take panoramic photos.

TIME Retail

Whole Foods Will Now Tell You How Organic Their Veggies Are

Produce will be rated based on pesticide, water and soil use, and its impact on human health and farmworkers

The next time you find yourself in Whole Foods’ fresh produce aisles, you’ll find that much of the research you wanted to do on how your food is grown has already been done for you.

Whole Foods began implementing a program Wednesday that rates fresh produce in its grocery aisles based on pesticide, water and soil use, and its impact on human health and farmworkers. The upscale supermarket chain said it is rating fresh produce on a scale from “good” to “better” to “best” with the intention of informing shoppers about the way fresh fruits, vegetables and flowers are tended and grown.

In addition, Whole Foods said it was prohibiting some insecticides that can impair neurological development in children. “After three years of research and planning, Responsibly Grown is the result of our collaboration with suppliers, scientists and issue experts to continue our strong commitment to organic, while embracing additional important topics and growing practices in agriculture today,” said Matt Rogers, global produce coordinator at Whole Foods Market.

Farms that participate in the program have to take steps to protect air, soil, water and human health, and only use pesticides registered EPA in order to earn a “good” rating. The “better” and “best” ratings indicate improved performance in those categories.

Whole Foods says the program will encourage farmers to recycle plastics, install solar panels, plant wildflowers to restore natural bee habitats, and more efficiently irrigate their fields, for example. About half the produce sold in Whole Food’s stores will carry the labels, the New York Times reports.

Whole Foods has been struggling to compete with cheaper food sources like Walmart, which recently announced its own organic food program. The company’s stock has dropped more than 30% this year, though its earnings have been stable.

MONEY stocks

Stocks Plunge Wednesday on Global Economic Fears

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Spencer Platt—Getty Images

Volatility is back with vengeance, and it's being felt throughout the financial markets.

Updated: 4:30 pm

Volatility is back with a vengeance on Wall Street.

The Dow Jones industrial average plunged around 450 points on Wednesday afternoon before recovering to close at 175 points down, marking the sixth day in October that the stock market has suffered triple-digit losses. The Dow, which had been trading as high as 17,145 at the end of September, sank to below 15,900 before ending the day at 16,141.

^DJI Chart

^DJI data by YCharts

This capped off the worst three-day sell off for the broad market since 2011.

Small-company stocks — considered the market’s canary in the coal mine, since they’re more easily rattled by changes in the economy due to their size — sank around 1% on Wednesday and are in an official correction, defined as a 10% drop in value over an extended period. Micro-cap stocks, the tiniest sub-set of small stocks, also fell and they’re only a few percentage points off from an official bear market, or a 20% decline.

Why?

Wall Street is having flashbacks to the bad old days in the aftermath of the global financial panic, when there were real concerns that the global economy might slip back into a deflationary and recessionary spiral.

Right now, the big worry is that Europe and Japan will soon suffer their third recessions in the past six years. Policymakers in both countries are scrambling to find ways to jumpstart growth, yet their central banks are running out of ammunition.

Meanwhile China, once viewed as the engine driving global growth, has been slowing noticeably in recent quarters and can‘t find a way to reaccelerate, as it works through its own housing and financial crisis.

“While domestic growth is robust, slowing economies abroad have the potential to upset the recovery,” notes Jack Ablin, chief investment officer for BMO Private Bank.

Those global growth concerns are now being reflected in two troubling trends.

First, there’s the plunge in crude oil prices. While a barrel of crude oil traded above $100 a barrel as recently as this summer, prices fell to around $81 a barrel on Wednesday morning. Falling oil prices are often viewed as a good thing — since lower energy costs free up households and businesses to spend on other things. Yet the fact is, people aren’t necessarily spending that money on other things.

Michael Gapen, chief U.S. economist for Barclays Capital, noted that U.S. retail sales fell 0.3% in September. “The main downside surprise in this report,” he said, came in core retail sales — which strips out volatile food an energy prices — fell 0.2%. He said that was “against our expectation for a four-tenths rise.”

Moreover, the price of oil sometimes doesn’t cause good things so much as it reflects bad things already in the economy.

Right now, investors may be asking: “Is this the moment of truth when lower oil is signaling lower demand?” says Neal Dihora, an analyst with Morningstar.

Similarly, fears over the global economy tends to drive investors into slow-growing but safe assets, like Treasury bonds. And this morning, the yield on the 10-year Treasury fell below the 2% threshold for the first time since June 2013, a worrisome trend as MONEY’s Pat Regnier points out.

Even more troubling is the possibility that the market is telling us that the financial crisis may not be squarely in the rear view mirror.

BMO’s Ablin noted:

“Decades of debt accumulation touched off the 2008 financial crisis and critics argue that the solution, quantitative easing programs, simply shifted borrowing from the private sector to the public sector. The Fed’s primary lever since the Greenspan years, boosting asset prices and enticing borrowing by lowering interest rates, is no longer working now that short-term rates are effectively zero. Scarred by the financial meltdown and an underwater mortgage, households have had a change of heart and are now more interested in reducing debt.”

And as investors are keenly aware, reducing debt doesn’t help stimulate economic activity.

MONEY retirement planning

Why Americans Can’t Answer the Most Basic Retirement Question

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marvinh—Getty Images/Vetta

Workers are confused by the unknowns of retirement planning. No wonder so few are trying to do it.

Planning for retirement is the most difficult part of managing your money—and it’s getting tougher, new research shows. The findings come even as rising markets have buoyed retirement savings accounts, and vast resources have been poured into things like financial education and simplified investment choices meant to ease the planning process.

Some 64% of households at least five years from retirement are having difficulty with retirement planning, according to a study from Hearts and Wallets, a financial research firm. That’s up from 54% of households two years ago and 50% in 2010. Americans rate retirement planning as the most difficult of 24 financial tasks presented in the study.

How can this be? Jobs and wages have been slowly improving. Stocks have doubled from their lows, even after the recent market tumble. The housing market is rebounding. Online tools and instruction through 401(k) plans have greatly improved. We have one-decision target-date mutual funds that make asset allocation a breeze. Yet retirement planning is perceived as more difficult.

The explanation lies at least partly in an increasingly evident quandary: few of us know exactly when we will retire and none of us know when we will die. But retirement planning is built around choosing some kind of reasonable estimate for those two variables. But that’s something few people are prepared to do. As the study found, 61% of households between the ages of 21 to 64 say they can’t answer the following basic retirement question: When will I stop full-time work?

Even the more straightforward retirement planning issues are challenging for many workers. Among the top sources of difficulty: estimating required minimum distributions from retirement accounts (57%), deciding where to keep their money (54%), and getting started saving (51%).

Those near or already in retirement have considerably less financial angst, the study found. Their most difficult task, cited by 33%, is estimating appropriate levels of spending, followed by choosing the right health insurance (31%) and a sustainable drawdown rate on their savings accounts (28%).

For younger generations, planning a precise retirement date has become far more difficult, in part because of the Great Recession. Undersaved Baby Boomers have been forced to work longer, and that has contributed to stalled careers among younger generations. The final date is now a moving target that depends on one’s health, the markets, how much you can save, and whether you will be downsized out of a job. Americans have moved a long way from the traditional goal of retirement at age 65, and the uncertainty can be crippling.

Nowhere does the study mention the difficulty of estimating how long we will live. Maybe the subject is simply one we don’t like to think about, but the fact is, many Americans are living longer and are at greater risk of running out of money in retirement. This is another critical input that individuals have trouble accounting for.

In the days of traditional pensions, many Americans could rely on professional money managers to grapple with these problems. Left on their own, without a reliable source of lifetime income (other than Social Security), workers don’t know where to start. The best response is to save as much as you can, work as long you can—and remember that retirees tend to be happy, however much they have saved.

Related:

How should I start saving for retirement?

How much of my income should I save for retirement?

Can I afford to retire?

Read next: 3 Little Mistakes That Can Sink Your Retirement

MONEY online shopping

3 Reasons Google’s Same-Day Shipping Looks Like a Game Changer

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Nick and Laura Allen—AP

Google already dominates search. If the big expansion of a same-day shipping service proves successful, it could be on its way to dominating online shopping too.

On Monday, Google announced that the express online shopping-and-shipping service it has been testing for months in northern California and parts of Los Angeles and New York City is expanding to three more cities: Boston, Chicago, and Washington, D.C. The service, originally dubbed Google Shopping Express and now shortened to just Google Express, allows shoppers to place orders online or via mobile device with partner retailers such as Walgreens, Costco, Staples, Barnes & Noble, and Sports Authority. Google promises same-day shipping on all such orders, at a cost of $4.99 per delivery or flat subscription plans of $10 monthly or $95 a year.

Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt mentioned this week at a conference that Google’s biggest rival isn’t Yahoo or Bing but is in fact Amazon.com, and the expansion of Google Express into Amazon’s online shopping turf is a clear indication that Google takes this rivalry very seriously. While Amazon is still the most dominant player in e-retail, Google’s newly expanded service is arguably superior and a better value compared to anything Amazon currently offers. Here are three reasons why Google’s service is particularly compelling:

1. Same-day delivery that’s “free.” Consumers increasingly demand free shipping with online purchases. Things have gotten to the point that free shipping is so readily available—via a coupon code here or reaching a minimum purchase threshold there—that the idea of paying for delivery can now be a deal breaker.

Thus far, the phenomenal success of Amazon Prime has most clearly demonstrated the power of shipping when it’s not only reliably free but speedy as well. Prime subscribers receive free two-day shipping on most orders placed via Amazon.com, and the service has proven so popular and indispensable that enrollment numbers have continued to climb even after prices rose recently from $79 to $99 annually.

Overnight and same-day shipping are more costly services than two-day delivery, however, and Amazon Prime members must pay extra for these expedited options—typically $5.99 for same-day shipping, where and when it’s available. That’s on top of an annual subscription fee.

Like Amazon Prime, Google Express is available via subscription, priced at $95 per year (just a smidge under the cost of Prime) or $10 per month. Members then get free same-day delivery of all orders with a minimum purchase of $15. (As an alternative, nonsubscribers can pay a flat $4.99 delivery fee per order.) One of the big differences between Amazon Prime and Google’s subscription service is that the former includes two-day shipping at no additional charge, whereas the latter covers same-day delivery. Prime has many other benefits—free video streaming, for instance, not to mention a much broader selection of products than Google’s service—but in terms of speedy shipping, Google Express has the edge.

Bear in mind that you’re paying for whichever service you choose. These services are presented as featuring “free” shipping, but that’s silly. Subscribers pay a membership fee to cover the costs of shipping, and there’s nothing free about it. “Prepaid” may be a better way to describe the shipping offered by these services. A subscription is a potentially good value in the same way that an all-you-can-eat buffet is a smart buy for someone who eats (or orders online) a lot, but it can be a waste of money for others.

2. Same-day delivery of stuff you actually need that day. Based on the success of Amazon Prime, plenty of consumers are more than OK with two-day shipping on the vast majority of online purchases. After all, when you’re buying a new TV, or a winter coat, or batteries or coffee pods or a Christmas gift for your aunt, or any other thing you might purchase at Amazon, there are generally no pressing needs that might require you to be in possession of them on the very day you place the order.

Likewise, same-day shipping would seem to be less of a necessity for the products typically purchased from Google Express partners such as Sports Authority, Guitar Center, and Toys R Us. It’s often a different story, though, for the goods one needs from drugstores and supermarkets, because when you need cold medicine or diapers or food on the dinner table, you tend to need them right away—not two days after placing an order. The normal approach in these situations is to handle the errand the old-fashioned way, by making a physical run to the store. But because Google Express’s early partners include Walgreens and grocery chains such as Giant, Stop ‘n Shop, and Whole Foods, these kinds of everyday errands can be crossed off your list quickly online, without even the need to pay extra for same-day delivery. (Same-day delivery from another Google partner, 1-800FLOWERS.com, is probably even more of a necessity among certain shoppers on certain anniversaries and birthdays.) For the sake of comparison, Amazon has already introduced an online grocery service in select markets with same-day and overnight delivery, but its subscription runs $299 per year.

3. Same-day delivery on stuff that’s a hassle to buy in person. Another intriguing partner of Google Shopping Express is Costco. The warehouse membership club giant is beloved by bulk-size-loving patrons, yet much about the shopping experience is less than ideal—starting with the huge size of much of its merchandise and ending with the absence of shopping bags for carrying one’s purchases. What’s more, Costco has had some trouble attracting younger customers because fewer millennials have cars, which are all but necessities for any Costco shopping trip, and they tend to want to live in urban areas rather than the suburbs where most Costcos are located.

Many of these issues disappear when Google and its same-day delivery service enter the equation. If Google is handling the pickup and delivery, customers no longer have to worry about being strong enough to maneuver gigantic tubs of laundry detergent into shopping carts, then into one’s car. Heck, there’s no need for a car at all because, again, Google is taking care of the shipping.

While Google’s service is still in its infancy, it’s probably being helped greatly by the fact that that a popular retail brand like Costco is a partner. But who knows: Down the line, it could be that Costco membership numbers rise because same-day delivery is available via its partner, Google Shopping Express.

Read next: Google Express Expands its Same-Day Delivery Reach

TIME Workplace & Careers

3 Little Words You Should Never Say

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PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou—Getty Images/PhotoAlto

Easy to blurt out, hard to take back

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This post is in partnership with The Muse. The article below was originally published on The Muse.

You’re in a meeting, just wrapping up your status update, and things are going well. The group seems reassured that you’re on top of things. Then, just as you’re about to close your laptop and head for the door, your boss’ peer asks, “How are projections looking for Q2?” Your boss nods in your direction and suddenly, all eyes in the room are back on you.

Blurting out a panicked “I don’t know!” may seem like the path of least resistance in an uncomfortable moment—but if you want to be taken seriously as an emerging leader, you should ditch that phrase and learn what experienced leaders say when they don’t know the answer.

Saying “I Don’t Know” Costs You Credibility and Influence

I once spoke with a woman who was truly an expert in her field—the only engineer on her software team with a PhD. But despite her technical chops, people kept sidestepping her and going to her boss with questions that she could have answered.

It turns out that the tech-savvy PhD was in a job that required her to represent the department in senior-level executive meetings where it had been deemed acceptable—even encouraged—to interrupt whoever had the floor and fire a rapid stream of tough questions at him or her. No matter how meticulously the engineer prepared for the meeting (and firing squad), she would inevitably fumble, lose her composure, and say, “I don’t know. I’ll ask my boss.”

Just like that, she had inadvertently trained people to go to her boss with their tough technical questions. It turns out that Dr. Phil was right when he said, “We teach people how to treat us”—and that this is especially true when it comes to establishing credibility and influence at work. Every time you say “I don’t know,” you teach people not to come to you next time.

“I Don’t Know” is Not an Answer—or an Option!

Once, while at a professional crossroads, digital marketing executive Dr. Patricia Fletcher reached out to a mentor for help. When her mentor, Jeanne Sullivan, a seasoned investor and corporate board member, asked what Fletcher would do in a hypothetical situation, Fletcher began her response with “I don’t know….”

Sullivan cut her short, reminding her, “‘I don’t know’ is not an answer. The correct answer is, ‘I don’t have enough information to answer your question.’”

Fletcher now looks back on this as one of the best pieces of advice she’s ever received. “When it comes to business, there’s no such answer as ‘I don’t know,’” she says.

Prepare a More Powerful Response

In the business world, a person who speaks with confidence is likely to be perceived to be competent.

Writing for ForbesWoman, negotiation and leadership expert Selena Rezvani suggests, “Rather than turning to ‘I don’t know’ as a default, prepare yourself with some more powerful responses.”

Wondering what your options are? Here are four powerful options I recommend you commit to memory:

  1. “I don’t have enough information to answer your question.” —Jeanne Sullivan, founding partner of Starvest Partners (and Dr. Patricia Fletcher’s mentor)
  2. “Good question. I’ll find out.” —Chris Turkovich, principal program manager
  3. “Based on what we know today, my thoughts are…” —Selena Rezvani, leadership author, speaker, and consultant
  4. “I don’t have the data at hand, but I’ll get it to you later today.” —Senior software engineer

The PhD software engineer from the story above practiced these responses while standing in front of a mirror until she was able to stand her ground when fielding a tough question. Now, when pressed for an answer, she looks the inquisitor in the eye and responds in a way that builds her leadership presence and authority. And now, colleagues and execs alike know to come to her—first, before her boss—with technical questions.

Communicating with confidence is part of a leader’s job. To join the rank of truly exceptional leaders, upgrade your communication toolkit and eliminate your “I don’t knows” in favor of more powerful responses.

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