TIME celebrities

Joan Rivers ‘Resting Comfortably’ in New York City Hospital

FILE  Comedian Joan Rivers Hospitalised After She Stops Breathing Following An Operation On Her Vocal Chords
Joan Rivers attends the 2009 Mardi Gras VIP party at the Zeta Bar of the Hilton Hotel in Sydney on March 5, 2009 Mike Flokis—Getty Images

Comedian was scheduled to perform Friday in Red Bank, N.J.

Updated 7:39 a.m. Friday

Joan Rivers, the 81-year-old comedian and television personality, was rushed from a doctor’s office to a New York City hospital on Thursday morning after she went into cardiac arrest, according to the Associated Press.

“This morning, Joan Rivers was taken to The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, where she is being attended to. Her family wants to thank everybody for their outpouring of love and support,” Sid Dinsay, a spokesman for the hospital, said in a statement. Rivers’ daughter, Melissa, said Thursday that Rivers is “resting comfortably” after the episode.

Rivers, who rose to national fame with her 1965 appearance on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, was scheduled to perform on Friday in Red Bank, N.J. The Count Basie Theatre said in a statement on its website that Rivers’ show has been postponed and that they “look forward to hosting the iconic comedienne in the near future.”

The entertainer gave a talk on Wednesday at the Time-Life building, where TIME is based, and had told the audience she had no physical ailments — even calling herself “lucky” — according to a reporter who was at the event. Rivers said she does not restrict what she eats and joked that the processed foods and fake sugar may be what preserves the body.

With reporting by Dan Kedmey

TIME psychology

Over-Confident People Are Seen as Smarter, Even When They’re Not

Young businesswoman, portrait
Getty Images

Fooling yourself can help you fool others into thinking you're not a fool

Turns out “fake it till you make it” is actually real. A new study found that over-confident students were more likely to be perceived as smart by their peers, regardless of their actual grades.

Researchers at Newcastle University and University of Exeter found that students who over-estimated their own grades tended to be perceived as more talented, and students who under-estimated their grades were seen as less talented, regardless of their actual capabilities. “Our results support the idea that self-deception facilitates the deception of others,” concluded Shakti Lamba and Vivek Nityananda in their study published Wednesday in Plos One. “Overconfident individuals were overrated and underconfident individuals were underrated.”

Because the study was focused on students studying psychology and anthropology, subjects that generally attract more female students, the sample size was female-biased. But while Lamba and Nityananda acknowledged that previous studies have found that men tend to be over-confident and women tend to be under-confident, their research found that gender had no effect on how people perceive self-assured men and women.

The researchers also warned that over-confidence can have more of an effect on individual decisions like picking a mate or hiring for jobs, resulting in self-deceptive and risk-prone people being promoted to powerful roles. “Promoting such individuals we may be creating institutions such as banks, trading floors and armies, that are also more vulnerable to risk,” they wrote.

In other words, even if you’ve made it, you’ll probably keep on faking it.

TIME Infectious Disease

Nigeria Confirms First Ebola Death Outside Lagos

Nigeria Ebola
Nigerian health officials wait to screen passengers at the arrival hall of Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos, Nigeria on Aug. 4, 2014. Sunday Alamba/AP

Doctor who died in southeastern city marks Nigeria's sixth Ebola death

Nigeria confirmed Thursday the country’s first Ebola-related death outside Lagos, the country’s main international transit hub.

The victim, an unnamed doctor who died in the southeastern oil city of Port Harcourt, marks Nigeria’s sixth Ebola death in a recent outbreak of the disease primarily affecting West Africa. He is believed to have been infected by a man linked to Nigeria’s first Ebola case, Patrick Sawyer, who died in Lagos shortly after arriving there from Liberia.

The yet-unnamed doctor had died last Friday, but Nigerian Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu waited until Thursday to confirm the case, the BBC reports. The doctor’s wife has been put under quarantine, while an additional 70 people suspected to have had contact with him are being monitored in Port Harcourt.

While the death marks a blow to Nigeria’s efforts to contain the disease, Mr. Chukwu noted that while “the problem is not over . . . Nigeria is doing well on containment, all the disease in Nigeria were all traced to Patrick Sawyer.”

The Nigerian government said Wednesday that schools in the country would not reopen until October 13 in order to help prevent the outbreak from spreading.

Recent figures from the World Health Organization suggest Ebola has infected more than 3,000 people and killed over half of its victims, largely in West Africa. More than 240 health workers have been infected with the deadly virus, for which there is no vaccine or cure, though it is treatable and survivable. Ebola is not airborne, and is spread only when humans come into contact with the bodily fluids of those infected with the virus.

West Africa’s health ministers will be meeting later Thursday to discuss measures to address what’s become the largest-ever Ebola epidemic.

[BBC]

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