May 5, 2014 10:21 AM EDT

I’ve posted about how people at the top of their field are relentlessly productive.

But you can’t sprint for miles. There’s plenty of research showing that being a touch lazy might be beneficial at times.

Here are six research-backed ways to get more done in less time by taking it easy.

1) Work Less

Working too hard for too long makes you less productive.

Yes, pulling 60-hour weeks is impressive.

But pull them for more than 2 months and you accomplish less than if you had only been working 40-hour weeks.

Via Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much:

(The best system for time management is here.)

2) Go Home

If you’re doing creative work, research says you’ll be more productive at home than in the office:

(More on what boosts creativity here.)

3) Take A Nap

Naps rejuvenate you and increase learning. Some of the most successful people of all time were dedicated nappers.

Via Daniel Coyle’s The Little Book of Talent: 52 Tips for Improving Your Skills:

What you can learn about good sleep from astronauts is here.

4) Procrastinate

Yes, that’s right, procrastination can be a good thing.

Dr. John Perry, author of The Art of Procrastination, explains a good method for leveraging your laziness:

A similar tip is described by Piers Steel, author of The Procrastination Equation:

Dr. Steel says it’s based on sound principles of behavioral psychology:

(Here’s more on “positive procrastination.”)

5) Go On Vacation

For up to a month after a vacation you’re more productive at work:

(Here’s how to improve your vacations.)

6) Hang Out With Friends

Easily distracted? Having friends around can make you more productive, even if they’re not helping you.

Via Friendfluence: The Surprising Ways Friends Make Us Who We Are:

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Related posts:

Productivity Ninja: 5 Powerful Tips For Getting More Stuff Done

Stay Focused: 5 Ways To Increase Your Attention Span

Work Smarter Not Harder: 17 Great Tips

This piece originally appeared onBarking Up the Wrong Tree.

Contact us at editors@time.com.

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