July 27, 2017 5:48 AM EDT

A roundup of new and noteworthy insights from the week’s most talked-about studies:

1 HAPPINESS DEFINITELY IMPROVES HEALTH

A review in Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being that analyzed more than 150 studies found that high subjective well-being–a rating people give their own lives–can positively affect everything from the cardiovascular system to immunity.

2 ONE IN THREE CASES OF DEMENTIA COULD BE PREVENTED

A report in The Lancet found that practicing healthier habits in nine ways, such as avoiding smoking and keeping blood pressure reasonable, could prevent brain decline in one-third of all dementia patients.

3 BELIEVING YOU’RE NOT ACTIVE COULD DIMINISH EXERCISE BENEFITS

A study in Health Psychology analyzing data from over 60,000 adults controlled for activity level and found that people who believed they were less active than others were 71% more likely to die during the study’s follow-up period of up to 21 years than those who thought they were more active.

–J.Z.

This appears in the August 07, 2017 issue of TIME.

Write to Julia Zorthian at julia.zorthian@time.com.

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