By Lindsay Kimble / People
September 28, 2016

Chelsea Clinton is ready for Donald Trump to start talking about things other than her family.

Chelsea responded to the businessman’s threats to bring up former President Bill Clinton‘s infamous infidelities at the first presidential debate in a Cosmopolitan interview, published Tuesday.

“My reaction to that is just what my reaction has been kind of every time Trump has gone after my mom or my family, which is that it’s a distraction from his inability to talk about what’s actually at stake in this election and to offer concrete, comprehensive proposals about the economy,” Chelsea, 36, said, “or our public school system, or debt-free college, or keeping our country safe and Americans safe here at home and around the world.”

While Trump didn’t bring up President Clinton’s affair with Gennifer Flowers or Monica Lewinsky during the actual debate, afterward the GOP nominee asserted, “Everything I wanted to say I got out except for the transgressions of Bill.”

Trump said that he didn’t want to bring up the former President’s personal scandals “with Chelsea in the room.”

“I’m very happy that I was able to hold back on the indiscretions with respect to Bill Clinton because I have a lot of respect for Chelsea Clinton and I just didn’t want to say what I was going to say,” the 70-year-old asserted.

Chelsea told Cosmopolitan that she doesn’t remember a time in her life when her mother, Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, and father weren’t “being attacked.”

“It just sort of seems to be in that tradition, unfortunately,” she explained. “And what I find most troubling by far… are Trump’s continued, relentless attacks on whole swaths of our country and even our global community: women, Muslims, Americans with disabilities, a Gold Star family. I mean, that, to me, is far more troubling than whatever his most recent screed against my mom or my family [is].

Ahead of the New York-based debate, Trump also threatened to invite Flowers, Clinton’s one-time mistress. Later, Paula Jones, the former Arkansas state employee that famously sued President Clinton for sexual harassment, also volunteered to attend. Neither were formally invited, though, and were not in the Hofstra audience.

This article originally appeared on People.com

Contact us at editors@time.com.

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